Patriot Resilient Leader Institute

Helping those who served bounce back and improve in body, mind and spirit.

aka Camp Resilience   |   Gilford, NH   |  www.camp-resilience.org

Mission

We leverage the scenic outdoors of the New Hampshire Lakes Region to improve the physical, social, mental, and emotional well-being of Military Service Members, Military Veterans, First Responders, and their Families. We facilitate outdoor experiential learning activities, life skills training classes, along with peer-to-peer counseling opportunities, in order to enable and empower participant resilience and well-being. Additionally, we prepare and encourage participants to positively impact their home communities.

Ruling year info

2014

President, Board of Directors

Kurt Webber

Main address

PO Box 7384

Gilford, NH 03247 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-4105905

NTEE code info

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

When veterans leave the military, they lose a familiar culture, camaraderie, and structure only to reenter an unfamiliar civilian world. They often begin to feel a lack of community and an isolation from the civilian world. Compounding this sense of isolation with service-related conditions (e.g. post traumatic stress, moral injury, military sexual trauma, and traumatic brain injury ) only makes each veteran’s personal situation worse. Without intervention, many veterans fall into the traps of depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. While the VA offers numerous group therapy sessions and counseling services, they are understaffed and underused. Additionally, the VA rarely takes therapeutic conversations outside of the building and into nature, and therapy is rarely paired with challenging outdoor sports activities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Camp Resilience

PRLI’s Camp Resilience retreats help New England’s service members, veterans, first responders and their loved ones recover and maintain their physical, psychological, and emotional well-being. These 3-4 day long retreats combine peer-to-peer counseling, life skills workshops, and outdoor experiential learning activities. PRLI covers the attendance costs apart from transportation to and from the retreat and a refundable deposit. Priority is given to applicants with service-related disabilities. Except for our equine events, Camp Resilience retreats occur in Gilford, NH with activities taking place throughout the Lakes Region. Camp Resilience hopes to provide veterans and first responders with the tools to develop self-improvement goals and sustained ties to their community. A private Facebook group is set up for each retreat’s participants so that they can stay connected!

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Emergency responders

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of veterans with PTSD served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Camp Resilience

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Camp Resilience

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of Patriot Resilient Leader Institute is to help those who have served bounce back in mind, body and spirit. To accomplish this goal, we run Camp Resilience retreats for service members, veterans, first responders, and their loved ones. Our retreats develop in our attendees strong senses of:
-Resiliency: Participants strengthen their abilities to bounce back from adversity in mind, body, and spirit.
-Self-Improvement: Participants develop goals based on their new experiences and implement at least one into their daily lives
-Camaraderie: Participants realize they are not alone in their struggles, build lasting friendships with their fellow attendees, and leave with a renewed sense of connection to their peers
-Community: Participants return home and give back to their community and peers
We are committed to providing our participants with tools that they can take home and use to improve their lives. We aim to reduce their feelings of social isolation and anxiety. We are committed to building an interconnected community of service members, veterans, first responders, and civilian volunteers. While we are a largely volunteer effort, we intend to become a self-sustainable, staffed organization running 30+ retreats per year in the next 5 years.

Camp Resilience retreats are modeled on a 2011 white paper prepared for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, “Channeling the ‘Sea of Goodwill’ to Sustain the ‘Groundswell of Support.” The paper concluded an effective healthcare model for veterans included pairing peer-to-peer counseling with outdoor activities and stressed the importance of building a community of both civilians and veterans . Camp Resilience retreats welcome veterans of all eras, branches, genders, races, etc. 8-12 attendees arrive as strangers and, over the course of the retreat, build a community. PRLI covers the attendance costs apart from transportation to and from the retreat and a $75 refundable deposit. Priority is given to applicants with service-related disabilities. Except for our equine events, Camp Resilience retreats occur at the Gunstock Inn and Resort in Gilford, NH with activities taking place throughout the Lakes Region. Attendees stay at the Gunstock Inn and eat meals at the Inn’s tavern and other local restaurants. Mornings at Camp Resilience feature yoga, and/or water aerobics, and life skills workshops facilitated by a combination of active or retired mental health professionals, life coaches, and other professionals. Life skills workshop topics include PTS coping mechanisms, resiliency, and financial management. In the afternoons, attendees, facilitators, and volunteers participate in an experiential learning activity. Outdoor activities for fall retreats will include hiking, kayaking, and indoor rock climbing. Activities conclude with facilitated “rap” sessions where the attendees discuss the workshops, activities, and total learning experience of the day. During the retreat, a private Facebook group is set up for participants so that after the retreat, attendees can continue to interact as a community and encourage each other to live healthy, fulfilling lives. Detailed surveys will be used to measure the effectiveness of the retreats on our attendees’ lives.

Our Board of Directors is made up of a combination of veterans and mental health professionals. We have developed mutually beneficial relationships with service providers.
We have a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the VA District 1 Veterans Centers wherein veteran center counselors/psychologists can facilitate or participate in our retreats without taking time off. The Centers also distribute our fliers to their clientele. We have memorandum of agreement (MOA) with Veteran & First Responder Healthcare (VFR) to run Camp Resilience retreats for members of the first responder community. VFR also distributes our fliers to its clientele. To date, we have run 2 retreats for first responders with VFR Healthcare with 2 more scheduled for 2020. We have a similar MOA with Clear Path for Veterans New England (CP4VNE) We have run 1 retreat with CLP4VNE. We have a letter of intent (LOI) with Home Base to run retreats for the veterans they serve, facilitated in part by Home Base staff. We have an event service agreement with Wounded Warrior Project wherein we facilitate retreats for Wounded Warrior veterans and their families.

In 2018, PRLI ran 11 retreats. In 2019, we were able to run 18, including our first retreat for first responders—a goal since the organization’s foundation. 95% of participants in 2019 rated our retreat as good or excellent experiences. By increasing the number of retreats we ran, we nearly doubled the number of participants we served from 2018 to 2019. We could not have done this without hiring our first full time staff member, our Program Coordinator, who recently celebrated her one-year anniversary with the organization. By 2024, we plan to be a self-sustainable organization running at least 30 organizations a year. To accomplish this goal, we plan to hire 4 additional staff members: a Director, a Fundraiser, a Licensed Counselor, and a Recreation Specialist. We intend to continue partnering with other veteran and first responder service organizations and planning new retreats tailored for the Special Operations and first responder communities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Patriot Resilient Leader Institute
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Patriot Resilient Leader Institute

Board of directors
as of 8/16/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kurt Webber

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/14/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data