PLATINUM2023

Young People In Recovery

Loveland, CO   |  www.youngpeopleinrecovery.org

Mission

Young People in Recovery (YPR) is a national, peer-led organization that serves youth and young adults in recovery from substance use disorder. YPR aims to improve access to resources such as housing, education and employment that sustain long-term recovery. YPR envisions a world where all young people have the resources they need to thrive in recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol. YPR’s mission is to provide the life skills and peer supports to help people recover from substance use disorder and reach their full potential. By creating a national network of individuals in recovery, we empower people to get involved in their communities by providing them with the tools and support to take charge of their futures.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Ms. Ann Herbst

Main address

201 E 4th St

Loveland, CO 80537 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-4109067

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (Y01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

Single Organization Support (F11)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Drug overdoses are now the number-one cause of accidental death in the U.S. with more than six in 10 deaths of young adults involving an opioid. Without access to aftercare support services like those provided by Young People in Recovery, youth, young adults, and also older adults in recovery from substance use disorder are likely to relapse, risking injury, disease, incarceration, and even death. A lack of funding for recovery support services means that people don’t have adequate opportunities to continue or complete their educations, find gainful employment, or access housing that supports their recovery from drugs and alcohol. Furthermore, continued stigma about substance use disorder and a lack of coordinated aftercare options such as life skills education and alternative peer groups means that youth, and individuals of all ages, continue to face significant obstacles to sustained recovery even after they exit treatment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

My Recovery is E.P.I.C.

My Recovery is E.P.I.C. is a branded, proprietary curriculum offered exclusively by Young People in Recovery to partners’ clients, families and staff. It is grounded in the core mission of YPR that centers on housing, education, employment, and recovery messaging. It is informed by the four dimensions that SAMHSA has identified as being critical to a successful life in recovery: health, home, purpose and community.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers

The Phoenix Program is a life-skills curriculum offered exclusively by Young People in Recovery to criminal
justice organizations, diversionary courts, and law enforcement agencies, equipping participants with tools to access housing, education, employment, purpose and community; four areas SAMHSA identifies as critical to a successful life in recovery.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Substance abusers

There are currently 58 YPR chapters nationwide. Each chapter has weekly all-recovery meetings, quarterly workshops focusing on life skills for individuals in recovery from substance use disorder and monthly pro-social activities. All events are offered free of charge to participants.

YPR chapters closely follow SAMHSA best practice guidelines for recovery support services: being age appropriate, reflecting the appropriate developmental stage, acknowledging the nonlinear nature of recovery and multiple pathways to recovery, promoting resilience, being strengths-based, identifying recovery capital services and supports, fostering social connectedness, increasing capacity of YPR chapter members to give back to the community, and increasing self-sufficiency in program participants.

Participants become better able to set goals like going back to school/getting a job; are more dedicated to their recovery than when they started the program; and improved their leadership skills; understanding of personal finances; and ability to locate recovery resources in their own communities.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Young adults

My Future is EPIC is a life-skills curriculum developed by Young People in
Recovery for youth aged 14-18 who are misusing substances or who are
at risk of developing substance use disorder. The program is informed by
SAMHSA's four dimensions to success in recovery: health, home,
community, and purpose. By providing youth with these tools, the program
helps students create plans for their upward mobility, health, and wellness.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Substance abusers

Related Program

YPR Chapters

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2022, YPR chapters hosted over 4,900 events such as all-recovery meetings, pro-social events, harm reduction workshops, and advocacy events, providing more than 68,800 services to the communities.

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Substance abusers

Related Program

YPR Chapters

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020, despite COVID, YPR served 37,125 people through virtual events such as free community workshops on housing, employment and education for young people in recovery from substance use disorder.

Number of research or policy analysis products developed, e.g., reports, briefs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Substance abusers

Related Program

YPR Chapters

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2022, YPR hired a Public Policy Director to assist chapters in local policy advocating to advance national policies that would support our mission in creating recovery ready communities.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Once a person leaves treatment, there is no single peer provider of aftercare support, particularly for people who may be going back to the same family, school, social group and environment where their addiction first took root. YPR aims to fill this gap and provide a more integrated and recovery-oriented system of aftercare. YPR allows people to speak out about substance use disorder and reduce stigma; creates opportunities for volunteer advocates; supports all pathways to recovery; reflects the diversity of the recovery community; and advocates for more recovery resources, particularly for young people.

YPR follows SAMHSA best practice guidelines by being age appropriate, reflecting different developmental stages, acknowledging the nonlinear nature of recovery and multiple pathways, promoting resilience, being strengths-based, fostering social connectedness, and increasing self-sufficiency in program participants.

YPR embraces a cross-sector, social partnership model. For us, that means working with any like-minded organization, individual, corporation, foundation, government agency and chapter member/leader who shares our goals and desire to help young people in or seeking recovery. On a national level, we work with SAMHSA, Addiction Policy Forum, Transforming Youth Recovery, the National Association of Recovery Residences, insurers, pharmaceutical industry representatives, treatment providers, recovery community organizations, state and local agencies, as well as many other patient advocacy organizations to build a national network of supporters and allies around this cause.

Program expansion and the related staff growth to increased operations will be the key issue moving forward for the next few years as YPR adjusts from being a tiny, “virtual" office with fewer than four full-time employees to its current consolidated position in Denver with seven full-time staff members and over 15 part-time salaried workers. In addition, a full-time administrative specialist was hired in Denver in order to assist with front office and back office responsibilities such as administrative duties to support the president & CEO and program director, events management, chapter intake and chapter onboarding. Moving forward, we see additional growth as the main budgetary challenge (and opportunity) facing the organization.

YPR has aggressive strategic goals and objectives to grow our programs and expand our services to those who need them. We have invested in our social media and chapter staff in order to support the potentially millions of individuals of all ages and recovery status who wish to express their support for YPR but do not have the time or interest to join or start a chapter as a member or chapter lead, or who simply don't live near one of our current chapter locations. We will continue to reach out to young people in recovery, particularly in communities of color and the Latino population, as well as launching a campaign to reach older demographics, including parents and family members of young people in recovery, friends and other allies.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Young People In Recovery
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Young People In Recovery

Board of directors
as of 07/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Alexa Eggleston

Audacia Consulting

Term: 2020 - 2023

Alexa Eggleston

Audacia Consulting

Lisa Johnson-Pratt, M.D.

Akcea

Kelsey Schmuhl, Pharm.D.

Ohio State University

Jenna Stapleton

Harmes Fishback Foundation

Sharon Young

Nonprofit Development Consultant

Ted Collins

Bright Heart Health

Hilary Hall

Leavitt Equity Partners

Erik Hansen

PriceWaterhouseCooper

Ken Maxik

Complete RX

Harry Cunnane

Caron Treatment Centers

China Isler

Integrative Spiritual Counseling

Andrew Kiezulas

Coatings2Go

Zina Navarro-Rodriguez

ZND Consulting

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/15/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.