OneReef Worldwide Stewardship

Vibrant Reefs, Thriving Communities

aka OneReef   |   Santa Cruz, CA   |  www.onereef.org

Mission

OneReef vision: Vibrant reefs, thriving communities. OneReef mission: We partner with island communities to combine traditional stewardship and modern resources to protect coral reefs. OneReef Model: A scalable solution for conservation that endures OneReef’s Community Partnership Agreement Model is a proven way to accomplish long-term conservation success. The Agreements: - include the community’s 20-year vision, shared commitments, expected outcomes, a spatial management plan, impact monitoring plan, and more. - provide financial, scientific, and technical resources to protect coral reefs: (1) Mentoring, training, tools, infrastructure to increase agency (2) Support for management plans (3) Science-based impact measurement (4) Long-term, leveraged financing

Notes from the nonprofit

Less than 5% of the billions of dollars spent annually on the environment is made available directly to locals who manage ecosystems. We work to fill this unmet need - we partner directly with island communities to protect reefs and recover fisheries. Our mission is based on the insight that island communities are more effective environmental stewards when their traditional knowledge and practices are combined with the right scientific, financial, and technical partnerships and resources. It ensures that practical and cost-effective solutions emerge.

Ruling year info

2014

Founder & CEO

Christopher LaFranchi

Main address

114 Oak Knoll Dr

Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-4293324

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Management & Technical Assistance (J02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Untapped Potential: For centuries, indigenous peoples have protected nature and ensured the survival of endangered species. We focus on a highly valuable yet underutilized solution – synergy between people with traditional knowledge and those with material and technical wealth who value the existence of healthy ecosystems. OneReef is nonprofit organization founded on the insight that local communities are the most effective environmental stewards when armed with the right partnerships and resources. We service the financial, scientific, and technical needs of local communities, through: Creating marine management & sustainable financing plans Delivering trainings, tools, and infrastructure to protect reefs Science-based monitoring for impact Building local capacity to recover reefs for future generations

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Coral Reef Conservation & Ocean Conservation

Bridging Two Worlds
1. Untapped Potential: For centuries, indigenous peoples have protected nature and ensured the survival of endangered species. We focus on a highly valuable yet underutilized solution – synergy between people with traditional knowledge and those with material and technical wealth who value the existence of healthy ecosystems.
2. Community-Led and Equitable: Marine protection is most successful when communities are in control. We work on the ground with communities and local governments, leveraging relationships to get results.
3. Long Term and Adaptive: Funding cycles can prohibit the realization of protection that lasts. OneReef does not leave after a few years; we work with partner communities for as long as it takes, and make course corrections as needed.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples

OneReef works directly with communities that want to protect their coral reefs from the impacts of human activity and climate change. OneReef’s Community Partnership Agreement Model is a proven way to accomplish long-term conservation success: (1) We combine traditional stewardship with the right resources and link economic benefits to conservation. (2) Agreements include the community’s 20-year vision, shared commitments and expected outcomes, a spatial management plan, impact monitoring plan, and more.
The right people in the right places
Our community partners have a strong “eco-identity” and take responsibility for their environment. They want their reefs to thrive in the face of overfishing and climate change.

The right tools and resources
Our community partners need financial, scientific, and technical resources to protect their reefs. OneReef mentors community members: (1) Training, tools, infrastructure to increase agency (2) Support for management plans (3) Science-based impact measurement (4) Long-term, leveraged financing

The right partnerships
We align private and public funds, technology, and science. Working hand-in-hand, OneReef, communities, elected leaders, funders, and technical and scientific partners combine modern resources with traditional stewardship. Joint problem-solving and meaningful engagement create enduring value.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of conservation areas with evidence that illegal activities causing key threats have declined or stabilized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Pacific Islanders

Related Program

Community Partnership Agreements

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Marine Protected Areas supported by OneReef Community Partnership Agreements to protect marine ecosystem that includes coral reef, birds, turtles, fish species, sharks, giant clams, manta rays, etc.

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Pacific Islanders

Related Program

Community Partnership Agreements

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Mentored rangers and leaders to mobilize enforcement of no-take zones and communicate the benefits of stewardship with communities

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Community Partnership Agreements

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Training and mentoring (workshops and on-the-job) provided to Rangers and Community Conservation Officers to help them better protect, monitor, and manage their Marine Protected Area

Number of community initiatives in which the organization participates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Partnership Agreements

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Community workshops for education and engagement, collaborating events and conferences, Traditional Skills youth camps, activities such as clean-ups, Earth Day etc.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Community Partnership Agreements

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

OneReef provides training and mentoring to Rangers and Community Conservation Officers (rangers in Federated States of Micronesia are known as Community Conservation Officers).

Number of evaluations conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Coral Reef Conservation & Ocean Conservation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Reef health is monitored using cutting-edge photogrammetry technology to track impacts from climate change and human activity. The number represents the reef sites that have been imaged.

Acres of land that gain formal protection status

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Community Partnership Agreements

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Acres of Marine Protected Area that OneReef helps support through its Community Partnership Agreements. The MPAs are legally recognized and therefore the no-take rules can be enforced.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Community Partnership Agreements

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Driven by a culture of stewardship, people across Micronesia including OneReef partner communities, volunteer their time and dedicate much of their lives to protect and manage their reefs and ocean.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We create durable public-private partnerships so that communities can sustain their conservation goals and create true environmental legacies. With Community Partnership Agreements that help protect over 500,000 acres of ocean and coral reef, we are working toward the goal of covering 2.7million acres, or 25% of Micronesia's reefs and expanding our scalable community-based model across the Asia-Pacific.

We have developed a vibrant team and strong partnerships that include economists, biologists, conservationists, Micronesians leaders, global funders, and technology experts. This dynamic network can respond to the needs of local communities and creatively solve and implement programs that work for local communities and for the environment.

1. WE PICK THE RIGHT PLACES

OneReef targets reefs that adapt to shifting conditions, managed by locals who benefit. The Micronesia Region is home to over 1400 species of fish and 400 species of coral, representing a key region of global biodiversity. Local and traditional communities, who are legal reef owners and stewards, want to ensure their reefs continue to thrive in the face of overfishing and climate change, two primary threats in the region. However, they often lack the scientific and technical resources that enable long-term conservation in quickly changing ocean conditions — which is where OneReef can make huge impact as a global partner.

2. WE DELIVER TOOLS & SERVICES

Through enforcement training, science, and novel technology, OneReef builds conservation success. We work on-the-ground with communities, community leaders, and governments, leveraging strong relationships to create change and deliver services. OneReef negotiates simple agreements with community leaders: agreements include no-fishing rules and catch limits for important fish species, and we create a long-term shared vision and finance plan for 20 years or more so communities can build impact into the future.

3. WE FOCUS ON IMPACT

OneReef measures reef health and local benefits to maximize impact. With support from us, communities and local partners protect over 500,000 acres of reef. We finance stewardship functions, provide immediate benefits to key stakeholders, and foster a measurable ecological response that produces community-wide benefits. When we invest, communities receive jobs, new skills, and healthy reefs.

1. WE MEASURE IMPACT

By learning about the fish and corals at our sites, we can determine the reef's health and create science-based plans. Through our collaboration with the Smith and Sandin Labs at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we obtain baseline biological data, using novel 3-D photogrammetry technology. With the help of Smith and Sandin Labs, we have trained our island community partners to use this technology which helps them adjust management plans to see the most benefits to their ocean.

2. TECHNOLOGY

Through technology, we can make conservation safer and more cost effective. Systems like desalination units, satellite phones, GPS, cameras, ranger stations and marine radars can help communities work in and protect their reefs. We constantly search for the best and most affordable solutions, working closely with partners to inform the design of new tools.

3. SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

Marine Protected Areas require effective local management to protect fish populations. We sponsor trainings, such as bringing US-certified enforcement officers to train local staff in Micronesia, to create well-trained and successful teams that can protect coral reefs.

4. FINANCING

We align multiple funding sources under a long-term finance plan for each program. By working closely with communities, philanthropists, foundations, and public funding streams, we can ensure reef protection benefits long into the future.

We have strengthened and grown the conservation programs with all our partner communities to the point where poaching has declined significantly. This is a huge indication of success, and we are also in process of assessing the biological impacts of fully protected marine areas with our science partners in the US and Micronesia.

We are building capacity in our partner communities through mentoring and training rangers and Community Conservation Officers. And by providing them with boats and surveillance equipment.

We are growing the long-term financing capability of these programs, leveraging public sources and building local capacity to attract funding from a variety of sources, in ways that allow communities to support their own projects with less and less help from us. Conservation benefits will continue to grow over time, and we are excited to build greater streams of local benefits that are both enjoyed by communities and explicitly tied to long-term protection and management.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Pacific Islander communities in the Micronesian Islands.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Through feedback from existing communities on the success of our programs, we were able to include new communities in our programs. For example, in 2020, we have expanded our work to 9 new communities that co-manage the Marine Protected Areas of Nanwap and Nahtik, in Pohnpei (FSM).

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have strengthened our relationships with existing communities based on their feedback of success of our programs. We have expanded additional support where possible.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

OneReef Worldwide Stewardship
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

OneReef Worldwide Stewardship

Board of directors
as of 6/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. John Dawson

Dr. Igor Korneitchouk

Philanthropist

Dr. Bernie Tershy

Institute of Marine Sciences at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC)

Dr. Lida Teneva

Consultant, National Geographic

John Reid

Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/12/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.