MarAlliance

Allied for Marine Wildlife

San Francisco, CA   |  https://www.maralliance.org

Mission

MarAlliance explores, enables and inspires conservation action for threatened marine wildlife, their critical habitats and dependent human communities.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Dr Rachel Graham

Main address

209 Mississippi Street

San Francisco, CA 94107 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-4381820

NTEE code info

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Marine Science and Oceanography (U21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Overfishing is the most important threat to marine wildlife and notably the large animals of the sea with slow growth, long lives and late maturity such as sharks, rays, and large finfish. These species are key to keeping the health of marine ecosystems in balance and yet also form the basis for small-scale fisheries throughout the tropics. MarAlliance works locally in several tropical countries to collect baseline data on threatened marine wildlife to inform and guide management and conservation measures. This is done while engaging and training traditional fishers, local biologists and students to ensure that local research and monitoring capacities are built and work can be both replicated and scaled to other sites and countries.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Spatial Ecology of Marine Megafauna

Conventional, acoustic and satellite tagging and tracking of sharks, rays and turtles to understand their spatial and conservation needs. Results are informing fisheries and protected area managers globally, regionally and locally and feeding into larger policy processes including country commitments to international conventions governing trade (CITES), animal migration (CMS) and the SPAW-RAC in the Caribbean.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples
Academics

We conduct regular standardized and highly robust and replicable baseline monitoring of marine megafauna (sharks, rays, finfish and turtles) with traditional fishers and community stakeholders to inform conservation and policy-making and mitigate threats from fisheries. The results are helping Governments and stakeholder groups including coastal communities to evaluate management effectiveness and target conservation actions to increase threatened species populations and improve the quality of their critical habitats.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Students

MAR kids is an experiential education program first implemented in Belize that is now running in Honduras, Panama and Cape Verde. Through this program we have been able to introduce science- and marine site-based learning to late primary school children through the lens of sharks and rays. The program combines school presentations and classroom activities that focus on shark and ray biology and behavior along with tenets of sustainable fishing, responsible seafood consumption and the utilities of marine protected areas with field trips to different marine protected areas.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Indigenous peoples

Micronesia’s inshore fisheries are overfished, with some states exceeding sustainable biocapacity by 3.5 times. This situation is driven by an under-valuation of marine resources and unsustainable gear use. There is now widespread interest in decreasing inshore fishing by shifting effort to the artisanal nearshore pelagic realm. Currently high fishing-related commodity and depressed wholesale fish prices have diminished the economic incentive to elicit such a shift. In Pohnpei, Micronesia, the local fisher’s association, Menin Katengensed, has established a not-for-profit sustainable fish market focused on fair-market pricing and value-adding to pelagic fish. Products include vacuum-sealed tuna loins, tuna jerky, ground tuna, and pelagic fish fillets. The market is the sole producer of these products in Micronesia and while popular locally, sales opportunities are limited. Thus, there is both an opportunity, a desire, and a need to expand to export markets and expand economic opportunities to local fishers and markets through cooperative purchasing agreements. The project will improve and expand current market operations and develop, market, and promote new and existing products, with the aim of exporting these products to the US, Asia, and Guam and serving as a blueprint to expand economic opportunity and decrease inshore fishing pressure within the region.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Pacific Islanders
Students
Adults

Following the ban on fishing nets enacted in Belize in November 2020, we are working with former net fishers and non net fishers to monitor the changes in populations of select and indicator near shore fishers including the iconic and critically endangered hammerheads. Monitoring will provide both a supplementary activity, a means to witness firsthand and quantify fish populations changes and improve science literacy that underpins greater engagement in fisheries management and conservation actions.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Students
Indigenous peoples
Students

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Marine wildlife thriving throughout the world’s tropical seas with community support and inspiring people to conservation action by achieving the following goals:
1. Increase knowledge of large threatened tropical marine wildlife.
2. Train and build capacity of key stakeholders in activities that support large threatened tropical marine wildlife conservation and the communities that depend on them.
3. Improve understanding, sensibilities, perceptions, attitudes and behaviors towards large threatened tropical marine wildlife conservation through communication, education and participation.
4. Create lasting partnerships, build alliances and offer memorable experiences conducive to large threatened tropical marine species conservation.

To improves the understanding and conservation of threatened marine species and their habitats, we create new knowledge by monitoring the abundance and characteristics of species in key sites. We train local fishermen to help us at sea and engage our local communities to obtain information on sightings of important species. We share this knowledge in different formats with many different audiences, from the youngest audiences in pre-schools all the way to politicians and other decision-makers. Through this, we hope to inspire a sense of wonder about the ocean, to promote sustainable tourism and to foster the effectiveness of marine protected areas.
More specifically, our work focuses on:
- Science for Management and Conservation: Working with stakeholders, from fishers and other NGOs to government institutions, we identify the science needed to support management and conservation efforts and build local scientific capacities while undertaking research and long-term monitoring.
- Effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas: We identify and recommend potential marine sites for protection and work with the managers, staff and a cohort of fishers from different protected areas in five countries to integrate protective measures for large fish.
- Fostering Behavioral Change: We consider that understanding the drivers of fishing and marine resource use is key to identifying management and conservation strategies. Using a host of survey approaches, from structured to semi-structured, retrospective to pre/post as well as online surveys, we collect multi-faceted data on a range of fronts. Results from these surveys are returned to stakeholders to tailor outreach, improve tourism management efforts for species, protected areas, and wildlife, and have supported legislative reform.
- Building Collaborations and Networks: We build social capital for marine wildlife conservation by linking the various skillsets held by partners through well-defined collaborations and networks. With these we are able to better understand, manage and protect the migratory marine species we work with and increase conservation impact.
- Developing Stakeholder Skills: Creating a large cohort of marine wildlife stakeholders who can understand and conduct scientific research and monitoring is critical to sustaining conservation. Students, fishers and partners take part in short- and long-term marine courses, learning how to develop hypotheses, collect, analyze and interpret field data. We further build partner skills in strategic planning, conservation and messaging, and advanced data analyses.
- Engaging the Public for Conservation: We work with all sectors of society to inform, educate and enthuse them with appreciation for the sea. MarAlliance helps identify and foster the talents of the next generation of marine scientists and decision-makers by introducing students to marine science and sharks. We inform the public and engage them through events, activities and social media

Our team has over 155 years of collective experience in marine research, monitoring, fisheries, capacity training, education, outreach, communication and policy support. We are nimble, preemptive and responsive, which helps us to meet the challenges of continuously changing fields of research and conservation.

Our team works collaboratively with partners from the fishing, tourism, government, non-profit, academic, and private sectors to assess, conserve, and restore populations of threatened marine wildlife.

Within the scope of our mission, we conduct baseline assessments, establish monitoring programs, characterize target species’ spatial ecology and population demographics, assess artisanal fisheries, and examine the effectiveness of marine protected areas. Capacity building of partners and targeted and public outreach and education cut across all projects.

We focus on projects with an identified need most often based on requests from our partners or communities. We share our approach and work from the start with fishers and their communities, who ultimately are best placed to effect changes that impact marine wildlife. Integrating fishers in research is critical, as they bring complementary skills and knowledge built on years of experience.

We simultaneously engage with donors, partners and decision and policymakers to generate political will and support for our key threatened species. Reciprocal learning, engagement, skills-building and an open mindset are key to long-term, locally based, adaptive and innovative conservation - all essential building blocks of our organization.

With 21 years of country-based experience working with large fish, turtles, fisheries, and the tourism sector starting in Belize, our work with large iconic marine wildlife began here. Since then we have expanded our work to Honduras, Panama, Mexico, Guatemala, Cabo Verde and Micronesia. Our goal for the next five years is to strengthen our research and conservation work and deepen our relationships with key stakeholders in these countries. Here are some of our recent accomplishments.

Belize:
• Deep sea fisheries program expanded with novel findings for several species of sharks and finfish
• Skills exchange with our Belizean fisher colleagues in Micronesia, Honduras, Mexico and Panama
• Completion of marine megafauna monitoring nationally
• Reached over 1500 students in the MAR kids educational program
• Co-founded the National Shark Advisory Committee (NSAC)

Honduras:
• Completed the baseline for large marine wildlife throughout the Bay Islands, completed sawfish surveys with traditional fishers
• Engaged over 2,340 students and 68 teachers in educational program
• Held first regional fisher and partner meeting to assess status and actions for marine megafauna

Mexico:
• Completed the marine megafauna baseline for multiple sites throughout Quintana Roo
• Conducted a trade in skills between Belize and Mexican fishers
• Monitoring skills training and peer to peer exchange between Belize and Mexican and Mexican, Honduran and Panamanian fishers

Panama:
• Completed baseline monitoring in five sites
• Conducted surveys with fishers throughout both sides of the country to assess the historical populations and current status of critically endangered sawfish
• Initiated our educational program in primary schools reaching over 3000 students and their teachers
• Organized a fisher exchange between artisanal fishers from Mexico and Belize with fishers in the Guna Yala Comarca
• Trained 30 local traditional fishers, university students, and biologists in standardized fisheries-independent monitoring methods

Guatemala:
• Completed first fisheries independent baseline for sharks, rays and turtles along Guatemala’s Caribbean coast
• Trained 7 NGO biologists and Government partners and 15 fishers in marine megafauna monitoring techniques
• Conducted two peer to peer exchanges for training between Guatemala and Belize
• Completed historical fisher and perception surveys and fisheries dependent landings project

Cabo Verde:
• Completed first fisheries independent baseline for sharks, rays and turtles throughout Cabo Verde’s Eastern Islands
• Completed fisher’s historical surveys
• Trained 9 traditional fishers in fisheries independent monitoring techniques for sharks and rays
• Engaged 460 students in the educational program

Federated States of Micronesia
• Creation of a physical market by fishers to sell and distribute more sustainably sourced seafood and compliance with fisheries regulations

Financials

MarAlliance
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MarAlliance

Board of directors
as of 7/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mark Wilkins

MarAlliance

Term: 2021 - 2024

Donald Kendall

Kathy Holmes

John Silver

Jaime Forman-Lau

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability