GOLD2024

The Prisoner's Hope, Inc

Making a Difference - one life at a time!

aka Proclamation of the Word Ministry, Inc   |   Louisville, KY   |  www.theprisonershope.life

Mission

Making a difference - one life at a time through the Love of Christ and effective mentoring.
Without education, family support, a place to live, no way to meet the basic needs of food and clothing and with a background that limits employment opportunities, it is not surprising that 36% of inmates quickly return to the environment that led them to prison--drugs, isolation, homelessness and crime. The goal of The Prisoners Hope is to break that cycle and help them integrate into society to lead productive, drug-free lives. For each life spared, thousands of tax dollars are saved; dollars that could be better invested restoring broken lives to walk a different path and make positive choices going forward. Our outreach is local and national

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Mr. Darryll D. Davis

Assistant Ex. Director

Mrs. Tiffany E. Davis

Main address

11501 Plantside Drive Suite 10

Louisville, KY 40299 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Proclamation of the Word Ministry, Inc

EIN

46-4488483

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Citizen Participation (W24)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (P12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Without education, family support, a place to live, no way to meet the basic needs of food and clothing, with a background that limits employment opportunities, it is not surprising that 36% of inmates quickly return to the environment that led them to prison--drugs, isolation, homelessness and crime. The goal of The Prisoners Hope is to break that cycle and help them integrate into society to lead productive, drug-free lives. For each life spared, thousands of tax dollars are saved; dollars that could be better invested restoring broken lives to walk a different path and make positive choices going forward.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Pre-Incarceration mentoring

Mentoring men and women prior to trial date.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
Women and girls

Mentoring men and women that are currently incarcerated.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Post incarceration integration mentoring, navigation and time management.
Lastly, we assist with post integration mentoring, assisting those coming out with an easy transition into society. We assist in finding a Church, accountability, clothes, jobs, shelter, a cell phone for potential "employer call backs” and Spiritual stability for their lives. We also assist with counseling and programs for continued education.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Weekly support group for families that have incarcerated loved ones. Giving hope and direction to broken families.

Population(s) Served
Adults

"The Parents Hope” Parenting classes,
The Parent's Hope is a 16 week curriculum that will be offered to each
parent, grandparent, guardian, caretaker, etc. of the children participating in the "Confident
Kids” program. Parenting classes are held at the same time as Confident Kids, in an
adjacent room. The Parent's Hope is hosted by TPH, and is facilitated by a gifted speaker
and a trained facilitator.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Helping children ages 4 through 12 deal with their feelings, choices, changes, and families.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Counceling for the family of the incarcerated. Counseling for the released.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Family relationships
Women
Men

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

“This (recidivism) is one of the most important social issues of our time," said Marilyn Flynn, Dean of the USC School of Social Work. What is recidivism? As it relates to incarceration, the dictionary defines it as; “a tendency to relapse into a previous condition or mode of behavior; especially: relapse into criminal behavior". So what can we do? At The Prisoners Hope, we will continue to pursue a holistic approach to help incarcerated men, women and families. We will continue to provide pre, during and post incarceration mentoring using programs that require accountability from the mentee and a faith-based approach to preparing them to return to society as a productive member. We will work with their children and their families. Helping them with not only practical needs that arise from the loss of a breadwinner, but the emotion trauma that incarceration leaves in its wake as it ripples through their lives. Alongside this, we will continue to work to make our voice heard locally and in the halls of government to assist in reforming systems that have not been effective. We will continue to help change lives – one person at a time.

Historical approaches that attempt to make the punishment harsh enough to discourage criminal behavior haven't worked. Longer sentences have a negligible effect on recidivism rates. And here in our own state of Kentucky, there is no mandate to do anything while one is incarcerated but keep your nose clean. How does that prepare an inmate for re-entry? Just helping an inmate get a job when they finish their sentence is too simple and answer to the real problem.
And factor this into the recidivism issue. Eighty percent of federal prisoners report a history of drug or alcohol abuse, two-thirds of offenders do not have a high school diploma or equivalency degree, up to 16 percent have at least one serious mental disorder and 10 percent of those entering jail are homeless in the months before incarceration. In our own ministry experience, 2 out of 3 mentees we serve are incarcerated for criminal addiction. These are problems that no amount of incarceration by itself can remedy. While we work to meet the practical needs of inmates and their families, here is what we believe is the heart of the issue – just that, the heart. Until there is a change in the heart of the individual, behaviors are not likely to come in line with societal norms. And without that heart change, dysfunction not only affects the recidivist, but will be visited not just upon this generation, but upon the next generation as well. With that in mind, we will not waver from our belief that we are all made in the image of God and that no offender is irredeemable. Lord willing, we will continue to be here doing the only thing we know how, loving people as Jesus loved them and using the power of the Gospel to move hearts to repentance.

Pre-incarceration - With scant information for the first time offender facing prison, fear, anxiety and confusion can be overwhelming for both them and their families. Experienced volunteers help prepare for the unknown by providing answers to questions, counsel and mentoring, as well as encouragement through support groups. We assist those that are out on bond or H.I.P. awaiting trial. We mentor men and women along the way, preparing them spiritually for what lies ahead. We conduct home visitations, counseling and studies in the client's home and require full accountability from our clients. We also assist families as they move toward trial and/or incarceration date. Incarceration - during incarceration, the The Prisoners Hope ministry mentors through jail visits where available, email correspondence, Bible studies and the inmate-led D.A.N.I.E.L. Project while helping family members deal and cope productively with their loved ones in prison. Support groups for the family meet weekly. Through mentoring we assist the incarcerated in getting their lives on point, directing towards spiritual excellence, pointing to Christ, whom alone can transform the heart and course in life. We require all mentees to acquire or complete a GED, MRT (Machination Recognition Therapy) and Life Skills classes and at least one (2yr) vocational certification. We require ongoing Bible studies, accountability, weekly Chapel attendance and at least bi-monthly correspondence. We endeavor to navigate each mentee to a place of spiritual and academic success prior to making their exodus from prison.
Note: Candidates for mentoring must be at least 1 year or more from parole or serve-out date. Post-Incarceration - a critical function of The Prisoners Hope is walking beside the offender who has served their sentence and is released back into mainstream society to make a smooth transition. We assist with the basic provisions of food, shelter, clothing, cell phones for potential employer call-backs, transportation and assistance with job placement. Along with mentoring through accountability partners, support groups and providing worship opportunities for spiritual stability, we also assist with counseling and programs for continued education. We are here to reduce the odds of prison recidivism and help restore families. Support Groups - support groups for hurting families, mentees and the post-incarcerated provide a platform for confidentiality, shared strengths in a non-judgmental atmosphere. It is a safe place where questions are answered and counsel offered. We also support families thru our Children's Bread and Water from the Well programs using well tested materials and instruction that addresses the collateral damage done by a parents poor choices.

In 2017, TPHMin. took on 17 new volunteers and are now operating at 51. We've had speaking engagements at churches, VBS, Boy Scout groups, and began conducting network luncheons at our facility, increasing awareness of our work. This year we've conducted over 65 jail visits and 3 funerals. Our case load is presently at 83 men and women either going to prison, in prison or leaving prison. That number does not reflect the number of families we are working with. We have assisted 16 mentees acclimate back into society this year and been blessed with the opportunity to give away four cars to mentees. We are presently
working on partnering with a few local churches. We will soon begin a 3rd
support group for families of the incarcerated. We have been blessed with an amazing facilitator to carry out that much needed support group which will me t weekly at Northeast Christian on Brownsboro Rd Louisville, KY.
We have been blessed with the opportunity to impact a number of men and women throughout 2017 and as the year ends, we feel that we have
given cheerfully from sincere hearts and from unfeigned faith.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

The Prisoner's Hope, Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Prisoner's Hope, Inc

Board of directors
as of 05/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr Brook Brotzman

Go Ministries

Term: 2017 - 2027


Board co-chair

Mr John Whitbeck

German American

Term: 2017 - 2027

Darryll Duane Davis

The Prisoners Hope

Julie Magnusom

Tom McKechnie

Jerry Woodcox

Mike Shryock

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/11/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/11/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.