EDUCATE GIRLS

Austin, TX   |  www.educategirls.us

Mission

Mission: We leverage existing community and government resources to ensure that all girls are in school and learning well. Vision: We aim to achieve behavioural, social and economic transformation for all girls towards an India where all children have equal opportunities to access quality education.

Ruling year info

2014

Founder and Executive Director

Ms Safeena Husain

Main address

815, Brazos St., Ste. 500, Austin, TX 78701

Austin, TX 78701 USA

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EIN

46-4493359

NTEE code info

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

India was ranked as worst amongst the G20 countries to be a woman in, and 4th worst in the world in 2012. This ranking reflects rigid social systems, limiting attitudes towards gender roles, neglect and lack of support by parents and community. Such discrimination has resulted in
India being home to largest number of illiterate women in the world (over 200 million [Source: UNESCO 2014]) with a female literacy rate of 61% (Source: UNESCO 2014) and 3 million eligible girls being out-of-school.

Exacerbating the issue of access to education, the quality of education provided in government primary schools is mostly very weak, resulting in inferior learning outcomes. In rural India, only 47.8 % children in Class V can read a Class II level text (Source: ASER Report 2016). India ranks amongst the lowest at 105th position among 129 countries on the Education Development Index.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Educate Girls

Globally, girls’ education has reached peak awareness as an issue worthy of the world’s attention and a vehicle for economic development and women’s empowerment. Educate Girls (EG) aligns its goals with the UN's Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by holistically tackling the issues of inequalities in access to education and gender parity. The EG model is designed with a gender lens that aims to work toward making quality education accessible to the most under-served and marginalized girls in rural India.

Educate Girls’ program is also aligned to UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) of ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education. Educate Girls implements a learning curriculum in school using learning kits called Gyan ka Pitara (GKP) in schools for children in grade 3-5. The activity-based curriculum is aimed at improving children’s micro-competencies in English, Hindi and Math.

On a national level, Educate Girls’ program model is built on the National Education Policy (Right to Education (RTE) Act, with a particular focus on rural, remote and tribal areas. Our program delivery mirrors the Government’s public education delivery.

Presently, we have programmatic interventions in 13 educationally backward districts in Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh namely Pali, Jalore, Sirohi, Ajmer, Bundi, Rajsamand, Bhilwara, Banswara, Udaipur, Jhalawar, Jhabua, Dhar and Alirajpur. These 13 districts include over 12,000 villages and over 16,000 schools.

Educate Girls works to bring about systemic change in the districts it operates in by mobilizing the communities and parents.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship 2015

Skoll Award

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

It is a well-documented fact that educated girls have a unique ability to bring unprecedented social & economic change to their families and communities and have a phenomenal multiplier effects on all development indicators.

Established in 2007, Educate Girls (EG) is a non-governmental organization under Section 8 of the Indian Companies Act, 2013 and 501(c)3 under the IRS. Educate Girls aims to achieve behavioral, social and economic transformation for all girls in India's gender gap and educationally backward districts thereby creating an India where all children have equal opportunities to access quality education.
With its innovative, multi-stakeholder, comprehensive model that resides on top of the India's The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act (Right to Education Act), 2009, Educate Girls mobilizes public, private, and community resources to provide quality education for all under-served and marginalized girls (6-14 years of age)

By leveraging the government's existing investment in schools, Educate Girls delivers measurable results to a large number of beneficiaries at an extremely low cost and avoids duplication or parallel delivery of services. Educate Girls has metamorphosed from a 500-school pilot in 2007 into a 16,000+ schools program spread across over 12,000 villages. Since inception, Educate Girls has enrolled over 150,000 girls and over 600,000 children have demonstrated improved learning outcomes. At present, Educate Girls' operations cover 13 educationally backward districts in Rajasthan viz. Pali, Jalore, Sirohi, Ajmer, Bundi, Rajsamand, Udaipur, Jhalawar, Banswara and Bhilwara in Rajasthan; and Dhar, Alirajpur and Jhabua in Madhya Pradesh.

By 2018, Educate Girls aims to scale operations to 16 educationally backward districts across India, reaching out to over 2.8 million children annually.

Educate Girls (EG) has set up holistic, community based program with a gender lens where the beneficiaries of the program are the marginalized girls between the age group of 6-14 years.

EG tackles the problem at its roots by focusing on the following key activities to achieve the outcomes of Enrollment-Retention-Learning

-Outcome 1: Enrollment:

Identification of Out-of-school girls (OOSG): EG uses various secondary sources of data like CTS, Census, etc. to identify OOSGs. However, these sources are often inaccurate, unreliable and outdated. Hence, EG's staff and Team Balika (Community volunteers) conduct an extensive census like door-to-door survey. The team reaches out to each and every household in the district in order to ascertain the number of OOSGs. Post which Team Balika persuades and convinces the parents of each girl to enroll her in school.

-Outcome 2: Retention:

School Management Committee (SMC) orientation and training & School Improvement Plans (SIP): EG formalizes, trains and works with 15 member council known as SMCs that consists of parents, teachers and village leaders to improve school governance and administration. The SMC is also provided with hand-holding support to prepare and execute plans for improvement of infrastructure like separate toilets for girls, electricity, water, roof, boundary etc. The SIP once prepared is then submitted to District Task Force of the government to unlock the state funding.

Bal Sabha (Girls' Council) formation and Life Skills Training: EG facilitates election of Bal Sabha in every Upper Primary School. This 13 member
council gives girls a voice, a leadership position in the school. EG trains girls in “life skills" to boost confidence, communication, leadership,public speaking, empathy and problem solving skills.

-Outcome 3: Improved Learning:

Learning curriculum:
To improve learning levels (numeracy and literacy), curriculum is implemented in schools for children in grade 3-5 with the use of specially designed kits called Gyan ka Pitara (GKP – Repository of Knowledge). The learning tools focus on building micro competencies in English, Hindi and Math.

Baseline & End-line evaluation of GKP: Educate Girls conducts pre-test
and post-tests in the schools to assess the effectiveness of the learning.

-General Activities: to achieve the above mentioned outcomes

Team Balika Training: Around 12 Team Balika training are organized during the year on various aspects of the program including identification and enrollment of OOSGs, orienting and supporting SMC, using kits to
implement curriculum in schools.

Community mobilization: through Gram Siksha Sabha (village education meetings) Mohalla meetings (neighborhood meetings) to sensitize the community about importance of girl education and engage them to prepare community based engagement plans. Enrolling a girl in school is only the first step. It is important that she stays in school and learns well. So, EG sensitizes the community also.

Educate Girls (EG) has built a comprehensive program model that is codified, scalable and replicable; for systemic education reform and not a parallel delivery model or a single strategy solution. EG model was designed to address crucial gaps in the government's “Education for All" initiative which complements the existing government set up and addresses the pervasive cultural barriers and social norms that prevent girls from entering a classroom in the first place. The key aspects of are:

1) Community ownership and empowerment
EGs programmatic interventions hinge around Team Balika (community volunteers). The program facilitates community ownership through the Team Balika, who come from the same educationally backward geographies. They are community mobilizers working as champions for girls' education and catalysts for school reform at the village level. EG empowers the community members by educating them about their rights to bring about the necessary change. Currently over 10,000 Team Balika are a part of EG.

2) Comprehensive model ensuring 100% coverage in remote and difficult geographies:
A “comprehensive model" for school reform designed specifically for hard to reach geographies (rural, remote and tribal regions). A cluster approach provides 100% coverage of an educationally backward district and allows EG to leverage its impact to enable grassroots change. The program substantially differs from the other programs as it does not offer a single strategy solution like scholarships, or material support and often EG is the sole NGO in a community.

3) Rigorous Monitoring & Evaluation:
EG deploys a rigorous baseline and end-line evaluation for every intervention and results are measured against a control group of non-program schools. We are a leader in adoption of mobile technology for Monitoring & Evaluation and impact assessment.

4) Value for Money:
By leveraging the government's existing investment in schools, Educate Girls delivers measurable results to a large number of beneficiaries at an extremely low cost. Evidence of Educate Girls' 'value add' is clear when looking at the costs and outcomes that government schools produce. Without Educate Girls' intervention, the Government of Rajasthan spends approximately $24,000 per year on a primary school and achieves:
o 9% out-of-school children
o 23% not attending
o Only 36% of children able to read a simple paragraph in their native language

EG spends an additional $400 and now the same school has:
o 1% out-of-school children
o 14% not attending
o 60% able to read a paragraph in Hindi

Education NGOs in Rajasthan that develop curriculum, provide educational materials and incentives for students, and build schools spend $40 to $100 per child per year. Because EG works in government schools and harnesses untapped resources in the form of community members, the cost of intervention is substantially lower, at about $5 per beneficiary child.

From a 500-school pilot in Pali district of Rajasthan in 2007, EG has metamorphosed into an 16,000+ school program spread across 12,000+ villages over 13 districts in Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh.

Since inception, Educate Girls has achieved following impact:
- 150,000+ out-of-school girls (OOSG) enrolled into school
- Over 600,000 children with improved learning outcomes in numeracy & literacy
- 25-40% Increase in learning outcomes across numeracy & literacy
- 4.9 million cumulative beneficiaries of our programs since inception
- By 2018, EG aims to scale operations to 16 educationally backward districts in India, reaching out to over 2.8 million children annually.

Our programmatic success has been hailed by several awards. Few of the awards are mentioned below:
2016 NASSSCOM Social Innovation Award
2016 L'Oréal Paris Women of Worth Awards
2015 Skoll Award
2014 WISE Awards
2014 USAID Millennium Alliance Award
2014 Stars Impact Award
2013 The British Asian Trust's Special Recognition Award
2012 WomenChangeMakers Awards

Development Impact Bond (DIB):
Educate Girls launched the worlds' first Development Impact Bond in the education sector in partnership with UBS Optimus Foundation as Investor, Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) as Outcome Payer, Instiglio as the Project Manager and IDInsight as 3rd party Independent evaluator. The DIB is a 3 year project and impacts 15,000 children across 166 schools in Bhilwara district of Rajasthan. The 2nd year results of DIB indicate that the program has been successful in achieving 87.7% of the 3-year enrollment target for out-of-school girls. and 50.3% of the total target for learning progress has been achieved.

Intervention in Secondary Education (Grades 9 – 10):
Combined with Educate Girls' longstanding experience of working in elementary education in Rajasthan, Educate Girls now proposes extending its intervention into secondary education by piloting community and in-school interventions for secondary school students across 110 villages in Ajmer district of Rajasthan for 2 years starting 2017.

Financials

EDUCATE GIRLS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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EDUCATE GIRLS

Board of directors
as of 7/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michael Pollack

Lisa O'Driscoll

John Somoza

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes