PLATINUM2024

ADDICTION EDUCATION SOCIETY INC

Mission

Addiction Education Society provides public education, information and resources on issues relating to substance addiction and its impact on individual lives, families, and in the lives of our communities to advance the knowledge that Addiction is a Disease.

Notes from the nonprofit

COVID-19 impacted the traditional in-classroom program presentation. This resulted in the development of an online program. We evaluate the experience of our constituents by using surveys (handled by Qualtrics), questionnaires, and holding feedback sessions. With this information, we modify and update our programs. We find it essential to build iterations of our programs in response to the feedback we receive.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Mr. Daniel Dadoun

Board President

Mr. Charles E, Johnson

Main address

One Franklin Parkway, Building 920, First Floor

San Mateo, CA 94403 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-4533989

NTEE code info

Secondary/High School (B25)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Use and misuse of alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs cost Americans more than $700 billion a year in increased health care costs, crime, and lost productivity. 10% of Americans will have a substance use disorder at some point during their lifetime, prevention efforts targeted to youths might improve educational, employment and financial, and health outcomes. Substance use by young people in the U.S. has proven to be a rapidly changing phenomenon, requiring frequent assessments and reassessments. Smoking, drinking, and illicit drug use are leading causes of morbidity and mortality during adolescence as well as later in life. To enhance the current program offerings in schools today, the Addiction Education Society (AES) in collaboration with various organizations, including UCSF, Stanford, and school districts in developing and piloting the Neuroscience of Addiction curriculum program. Evidence-based resources created by educators and researchers aimed at preventing drug use.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Neuroscience of Addiction curriculum

Background: The Neuroscience of Addiction is an interactive researched-based curriculum that effectively communicates to high school students the brain processes underlying the disease of addiction. The students understand how all addictions develop, who is at risk, and coping strategies.

Our current programs include a turnkey, 6 session program which encompass case studies, discussions and activities, called the Neuroscience of Addiction (NOA). Designed to help youth understand the fundamentals of how all addictive drugs affect the pleasure centers of the brain, how the disease of addiction develops, who is most likely to get it, and why. The curriculum covers the entire spectrum of the disease process, including the critical element of an evidence-based treatment model created by Dr. Stalcup called Craving Identification and Management (CIM). Students give up something potentially addictive for 4 days and analyze their craving experience vis a phone app. This gives them insight into addiction and what an addict goes through while craving their drug of choice. Additionally, NOA includes a module on vaping, a current epidemic facing the youth of America, and “How Did This Happen to Me,” a personal perspective.

The program currently serves Northern California middle and high school districts including both the public and private sectors. In addition, we have recently expanded to Maine and Washington states. Our goal is to empower teachers to have the most current and effective resources to combat the addiction epidemic in America. We hope to become the ubiquitous anti-addiction program nation-wide.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Education 2013

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students receiving information on alcohol and other drug use

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Neuroscience of Addiction curriculum

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This includes our middle school program as well.

Number of students receiving information on tobacco use and addiction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Neuroscience of Addiction curriculum

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This includes our middle school program.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid using illegal substances

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Neuroscience of Addiction curriculum

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes our middle school program.

Number of Schools Implementing Substance Abuse Prevention Curricula

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Neuroscience of Addiction curriculum

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This includes our middle schools.

Number of Teachers Implementing the Neuroscience of Addiction Curriculum

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Neuroscience of Addiction curriculum

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This includes teachers teaching the middle school program.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Conduct feasibility study to identify current drug and alcohol program offerings at middle and high schools in San Mateo County
2. Develop a website which will provide robust information related to Drugs and Alcohol and the latest trends and resources available to youth, teachers and parents.
3. Collaborate with organizations, schools and non-profit organizations raising awareness that Addiction is a Disease.
4. Develop a Neuroscience of Addiction video curriculum program targeting middle and high school students.
5. Develop and implement a Craving Experiment application for the phone.
6. Provide up-to-date information and resources to educational institutions.
7. Develop a modified curriculum for the after-school environment.
8. Participate in school-wide health fairs.
9. Recruit and train volunteers in the Neuroscience of Addiction Curriculum.
10. Secure guest speakers to present their personal challenges with addiction.
11. 24/7 access to Dr. Stalcup, one of our program's founders, a renowned addiction field expert.
12. Develop Teacher Dashboard.
13. Enhance our website to enable teachers, parents, and students to download Neuroscience of Addiction program materials.
14. Develop curriculum for Spanish-speaking students, teachers, and parents.

1. Feasibility study: Research, identify, assemble and meet with key stakeholders in the community. Develop template questionnaire and summarize internal report.
2. Develop website: Gain knowledge from students and teachers on best practice websites. Identify and incorporate latest statistics, research, activities and resources for youth, parents and community.
3. Collaborate with individuals and organizations: Develop partnerships with stakeholders in school districts, health organizations, addiction specialist and experts in the field of addiction education.
4. Program offering: Develop 6-session Neuroscience of Addiction pilot program targeting high school and middles school students:
-Observe, analyze and gain insights from educators and students on program enhancements
-Provide teacher professional development and 1 on 1 training on piloting program
-Develop v.5 Pilot program to selected schools. Administer program to 420 students
-Develop pre and post student surveys to measure program content retention
-Rollout 6 day program to Sequoia Union High School District with over 1,500 students participating
-Rollout program to entire freshman student body class at Sequoia Union High School District in 2018
-Develop marketing strategy to reachout and provide program globally
-Engage parents and students with intergenerational conversation regarding drug and alcohol use.
-Develop curriculum for Spanish-speaking students, teachers, and parents.

-To accomplish our goals, we've recruited outstanding leaders and professionals to join our board of directors.
-Developed a youth advisory committee which encompass youth from various organizations and backgrounds.
-Developed close relationships with school administrators, health professionals and other non profit organizations.
-Our curriculum development team comprise of retired school teachers, administrators, students, parents, after school program directors, addiction specialists, doctors and key stakeholders in our community.

2014-Recruited 6 outstanding board members and community ambassadors on behalf of our cause
2015-Recruited 15 youth advisory council members
2015-Organization website launched
2015-2 day pilot program introduced
2016-Developed 6 day program based on teachers/students input
2017-Administered program to 1,500 students
2018-Summarizing pre & post survey outcome reports
-Administer Control Group survey
-V.3 program updates and enhancements
-Develop website management platform
-Rollout program to entire school district in fall 2018.
-Develop various addiction/tracking APPS
-Collaborate and develop Middle School program
-Develop marketing plan to enable program distribution
-Implement signature fundraising events
2019-V.4 program updates and enhancements
2020-Develop V.5 program enhancements
-Enhance student craving experiment experience
-Pilot V.4 Spanish-speaking program
-Neuroscience of Addiction content download enhancements
Ongoing-continue to develop partnership and collaborations
-Teacher professional development
-Observe program offering and recommend best practice updates
-Host student focus group lunches to gain potential

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

ADDICTION EDUCATION SOCIETY INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ADDICTION EDUCATION SOCIETY INC

Board of directors
as of 01/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Greg Johnson

Franklin Templeton

Term: 2022 - 2025

Ward Carey

Business Consultant

Bucky Isaacson

CTAExpo LLC

Marcelle Costello

Consultant

Bert Bower

TCI

David Sheff

Author

Charles R. Johnson

FTCI

Elena Chartoff

Harvard McLean Hospital

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/24/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/27/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.