Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance

aka NAFSA   |   Flagstaff, AZ   |  https://nativefoodalliance.org/

Mission

NAFSA provides advocacy, education and networking to Native communities nationally as they revitalize their Indigenous food systems.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Lilian Hill

Main address

2205 East 7th Avenue

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 USA

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EIN

46-4578553

NTEE code info

Community Service Clubs (Kiwanis, Lions, Jaycees, etc.) (S80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Indigenous Seed Keepers Network (ISKN)

ISKN provides intergenerational mentorship, education, technical assistance, and advocacy for Indigenous farmers and crops to empower Tribal communities in rebuilding local food systems. Alongside our community partners, ISKN is increasing the number of seed stewards within our tribal communities while supporting our partner farmers in planning that will sustain long-term Indigenous seed and food sovereignty in their communities. Current initiatives include the development of an Upper Midwest Cooperative Seed Hub and, in 2022, NAFSA will begin a second Cooperative Seed Hub with our partners in the Northeast.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Indigenous people across North America, Canada and Mexico.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 2020, NAFSA received an unprecedented number of requests for seeds from Indigenous families. To meet our communities needs, NAFSA’s Indigenous Seedkeepers Network (ISKN) quickly mobilized Phase I of an Indigenous Seed Drive to empower families in the creation of “Hope and Resilience” gardens and successfully distributed 731+ seed bundles to Indigenous families and organizations. By June 2021, NAFSA had an additional 197 requests for seeds and as a result have launched a Phase II Seed Drive.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    As a Native-led organization that serves Native communities across the country, NAFSA’s priorities and direction are determined by the communities we serve through community-based listening sessions as well as through election to our Board of Directors (Leadership Council). In all of NAFSA’s programs, we work alongside community partners with each of our projects directly informed and shaped by processes of listening and responding to the specific needs of each unique community. When a project has reached completion, we again engage in community-based listening to gain feedback that informs our next cycle of grassroots initiatives.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance

Board of directors
as of 9/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Julie Garreau

Executive Director of Cheyenne River Youth Project

Edward Hall III

Transportation Specialist/ Toursim Coordinator, Bureau of Indian Affairs

Jon Mathews

Chief Financial Officer, Colombia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission

Elizabeth Hoover

Associate Professor, Environmental Science and Policy Management (ESPM), Affiliate, Berkeley Food Institute University of California, Berkeley

Dan Cornelius

Technical Assistance Specialist for the Great Lakes Region, Intertribal Ag Council

Roy Kady

Slow Food Navajo-Churro Sheep Presidium

Clayton Brascoupe

Executive Director, Native American Traditional Farmers Association

Terrol Johnson

Executive Director, Tohono O’odham Community Action

Elvera Sargent

Manager, Friends the Akwesasne Freedom School

Josie Chase

Ihunktawanna/Hunkpa Consultant /Director Horse Nation Healing

Loretta Oden

Chef & Food Historian

Tristan Reader

Assistant Professor of Practice American Indian Studies/McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship University of Arizona

Lillian Hill

Founder, Hopi Tutskwa Permaculture Institute

Montoya Whiteman

Senior Director of Marketing, American Indian Science and Engineering Society

John Bonaparte

Founder and Grower, Bare Bones Farm

Tanya Garcia

Community Grower and Seedkeeper

Michelle DuBray

Founder, Pinto Horse Woman Consulting

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Native American/American Indian/Indigenous
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/08/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.