Youth Development

BIG IDEA PROJECT

Generous Leadership Starts Here

Littleton, CO   |  www.bigideaproject.org

Mission

Big Idea Project exists to unleash the potential of students.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Mrs. Tricia Halsey

Main address

Po Box 581

Littleton, CO 80160 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

46-5040820

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

More than ever, schools need to prepare students for life. Leaders in education and business agree that soft skills are the missing link for student workforce readiness and success after graduation. Yet, education focuses on academics at the expense of real world learning. According to a 2017 Deloitte Insights Report ‘Generation Z Enters the Workforce’, 2016 Monster Multi-Generational Survey: 74% of US high school students believe their work should have a higher purpose 49% of US high school students want to have their own business someday 37% of US high school students worry that technology is weakening their ability to maintain strong interpersonal relationships 29% of US employers are concerned that they won’t be able to successfully recruit, train, and retain Generation Z employees due to the gap between Generation Z skills and employer expectations. Our whole-student approach to education includes teaching students how to think critically, feel deeply, and act confidently.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Big Idea Project

We provide schools with a comprehensive leadership development program that goes beyond academic skills to meet the needs of the whole student, equipping them for life beyond the classroom. We work closely with teachers (the heroes in the classroom) to provide training, resources, business mentors, and on-site support so they can unlock their students’ potential. Our proven model is to use service learning as a tool for learning, in parallel with highly relevant content. Students observe the world around them to identify an issue that negatively impacts others. They then work together in teams to be the solution. As they work in and outside of the classroom, they grow as people. They see the world from a new perspective. They learn skills such as responsibility, communication and project management. They recognize what it means to care for themselves and others. They recognize their value and find meaning in their work.

Population(s) Served
Students
General/Unspecified
Budget
$530,000

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related Program

Big Idea Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

From 2017 to 2018 we grew almost 30%. We are anticipating a 40% growth from 2018 to 2020.

Number of children who have a sense of their own feelings and an ability to express empathy for others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related Program

Big Idea Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

384 students completed both a pre and post program survey. 83% indicated a growth in their ability to express empathy for others.

Number of students demonstrating responsible behaviors and work habits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related Program

Big Idea Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

384 students completed both a pre and post program survey. 89% of students said they had grown as a leader and one or more of the 8 leadership and workforce readiness measures.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

The desired outcome of BIP is to prepare students to lead with skill, compassion and confidence. We do this by: 1. Increasing the reach and accessibility of Big Idea Project to all types of communities across Colorado (urban, rural, mountain). 2. Continue to hone the implementation process so that we may serve more students and teachers each year. 3. Deepen the long-term effect of the Big Idea Project experience for current students by engaging professional mentors to help move students from 'entry level' learners to practicing generous leaders.

To bridge the nation's leadership gap, BIP brings an innovative, experiential learning program to high school students. At BIP, leadership starts with a way of seeing self, others and the world that is based on empathy, generosity and responsibility. Big Idea Project is unique. Led by trained teachers with a proven curriculum, it is integrated into regular classroom studies as students are challenged to identify a problem in their community that they want to impact. High school teachers attend a one-day, in person training to become certified in implementing the BIP curriculum in their classrooms. In groups of three or four, students choose a social issue they want to address and develop a plan to make a difference in that area. With the coaching of a business mentor (a volunteer from the community), the team comes up with positive, innovative solutions. Real work, real solutions, for real life. The students then carry out their Big Idea, positively affecting their community. Throughout this experience, students put into practice the skills and values of Generous Leaders. At the culmination of their project, these teams create a storytelling video that chronicles their journey and their results. The top team from each school is invited to a statewide presentation to vie for college scholarships. By empowering students with choice in their project selections, BIP builds entrepreneurial confidence, activates student passions, and helps them discover their real ability to affect meaningful change. For example, a team of four boys at Legend High School chose to make a deeper impact on a few people. They connected with a single mother and her two children and asked how they could help. The mom was working two jobs and wanted to take a financial and debt management class once a week. The teens started by caring for the children each week so that she could attend the class. They went far beyond babysitting by engaging the younger children in activities such as crafts and cooking and tutoring them. The 12-year-old son had a D in math. After the teens tutored him for a while, he raised that grade to a B and was able play football for his school. This BIP team intentionally became a part of the family. They continue to see them and attend the children's activities. The mother was able to get out of debt and quit one job, and the younger boy has volunteered in the community, following the example of the older boys.

Tricia Halsey is the Co-founder and Executive Director. She has worked with nonprofit organizations and for-profit companies to build organizational capacity, identity, culture, strategy, programs, product and teams. As a business leader, she was instrumental in taking a small business from start-up to recognized expert; designing everything from company identity, messaging, product offering, leadership training curriculum and strategic relationships. As a senior leader in an international nonprofit organization, she oversaw staff and programs in four countries, developed the direction for programs, led staff development and directed process improvement. She holds an M.A. in Leadership and a B.A. in English. In three years operating as a nonprofit, BIP has built strong relationships with schools throughout the Denver Metro area and local and national businesses that serve as a solid base from which to grow the organization throughout the state and nation. Mike Ramsey is the Director of Operations. He has over 20 years of experience with non-profit, student focused organizations, both in the US and abroad. Having helped lead student organizations and events in over 30 countries on 4 continents, Mike has a well rounded skill set for helping to lead a growing organization empowering leaders.

BIP works with a professional consulting firm that conducts evaluation research by surveying participating students and educators. Each year they measure growth in student's empathy, professional acumen, problem solving ability, public speaking ability, and self-efficacy to lead generously. For the 2018-2019 school year: 1. According to a pre and post survey that measures student skill development, 89% of students showed growth in one or more of the eight main leadership and workforce readiness measures. 2. More than 94% of educators agreed or strongly agreed that the Big Idea Project helped their students acquire valuable workforce and professional skills. 3. More than 8 out of 10 students grew in empathy, a foundational skill for leadership and life. 83% of students agreed that as a result of participating it is easier to put themselves in others’ shoes. 4. BIP strengthens student well-being by reducing feelings of isolation. 81% of students said from their experience they learned that other students and their teacher support them and their goals. Nearly 90% of teachers agreed that the program improved their students’ overall well-being. For the 2019-20 school year, BIP expects participation from approximately 900 students and 30 teachers from 15 schools.

Since 2014 Big Idea Project has trained 3,000 high school students from all races and economic levels across the front range of Colorado. These students have directly made an impact on over 36,000 people in our communities. We have trained over 60 teachers to deliver our curriculum and empowered them to be the hero in their classrooms. We have enlisted the help of over 850 professional, business mentors. Who have helped to coach, lead and mentor students. Because BIP has seen demand increase from educators in Colorado and across the United States, the long-term goal is to certify and support Big Idea Project Educators from every state in the country. During the 2019-20 school year, BIP is building a sustainable infrastructure and operations for increased scalable impact. We will continue development of our program implementation to allow for easy teacher and student on boarding.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.).

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback.

Financials

BIG IDEA PROJECT
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

BIG IDEA PROJECT

Board of directors
as of 10/1/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Todd Johnson

Legacy Capital Partners

Term: 2017 - 2020

Todd Johnson

Legacy Capital Partners

Kurt Meyers

TD Ameritrade

Sara van Rensburg

Colorado Thought Leaders Forum

Tricia Halsey

Big Idea Project

Frank DeAngelis

Columbine High School

Lori Jones

Avocet Communications

Lance Sherwood

Mosiac HCM

Randy Niemann

ART

Denise Burrows

CO State Auditors Office

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/01/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

Generous Leadership high school students leader development