SILVER2022

The Retrievers

Come Back Home, Puppies. Stay Warm Puppies.

aka The Retrievers   |   Woodbury, MN   |  www.theretrievers.org

Mission

We help families bring their missing dog home and ensure the safety of stray dogs.

Ruling year info

2015

Director

Jennifer Cadigan

Director

Jessica Peterson

Main address

PO Box 25781

Woodbury, MN 55125 USA

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EIN

46-5048662

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Humane Trapping of lost dogs

Well-adjusted, confident dogs usually don’t stay missing for long. That’s because they’re easy to catch. They’ll walk up to strangers, and if they’re wearing ID, they’ll usually be returned home right away.

But some dogs are naturally shy, especially those who were not well socialized to humans as puppies. Dogs raised in puppy mills and hoarding situations are the most difficult to recover. They will bolt in panic when startled, or escape at the first opportunity when faced with a stressful situation. They may run for several miles before slowing down. And then, they will avoid human contact, running away from anyone who tries to approach.

However, even well-socialized dogs may instinctively go into “survival mode” after finding themselves separated from their owners for a period of time. While in this state of mind, dogs perceive all humans as threats. It’s not uncommon for a dog to flee even from his own family.

To recover a skittish dog, it’s often necessary to catch it in a live trap. There are many commercial models of traps designed to catch animals without hurting them. They are typically the size of a dog crate or kennel and are triggered when the dog is lured far enough into the trap to step on a pressure plate, releasing a mechanism that causes the door to slam shut.

In our experience with lost dog searches, we’ve learned that many dogs will refuse to enter a trap of this size. Some will become so desperate that eventually hunger wins out over fear, and only then will they be captured. The downside of this, of course, is that the dog is loose and at risk—and hungry and scared and alone—longer than he needs to be.

In response to a search for Missy, a Golden Retriever who had repeatedly refused to enter a crate-sized trap, Retrievers founding member Greg James designed a much larger trap and built it from materials commonly available at hardware stores and farm supply retailers. Missy was caught the second night the trap was set. From that point on, our invention has been known as “the Missy Trap.”

Population(s) Served
Families

Thanks to a surge in rescue organizations over the past decade, more shy and fearful dogs are being rehabilitated instead of euthanized as unadoptable.

But we’re also seeing a corresponding increase in the number of dogs going missing. Barely a day passes when we don’t see a new listing on our Facebook feed for a missing foster dog, newly adopted dog, or dog that bolted during transport.

A skittish dog—or any dog under stress—is a flight risk. Because rescues routinely transition dogs from one living situation to another, the odds of losing a dog are high.

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals with freedom from hunger and thirst

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humane Trapping of lost dogs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total number of incoming assistance requests from lost dog owners or community members with a stray

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Retrievers was formed to provide lost dog services at no charge to help distraught families and dog rescue organizations in Minnesota find their lost dogs and bring them to safety again.

We are also striving to reduce the number of dogs that go missing by educating the public in lost dog prevention. We are developing partnerships with rescue organizations to help educate their fosters, transporters, and new adopters and to assist in creating best-practice protocols.

The Retrievers is focused on a core team of active volunteers who provide consultation and humane trapping to owners and rescues. Retrievers' team members are expected to volunteer an average of 5-10 hours per week, helping to keep the organization comprised of people who are substantially and continuously involved.

When we need more hands-on help, we ask the public to get involved with distributing signs and flyers and participating in ground searches. This enables us to create ad hoc teams comprised of experienced Retrievers personnel combined with a scalable resource of volunteers in the geographical area where the search is being conducted.

Our presence on social media allows us to reach almost 5,000 supporters. We leverage this base of supporters for outside volunteers as needed on any given case.

Our lost dog education efforts began in 2015, and we are only beginning to reach the large number of foster-based rescues in Minnesota.

In the broader arena of public education, we struggle as a small organization to instill the very simple but crucial message to never chase a lost dog. In so many of our cases, someone has chased the dog and caused it to be even more difficult to recover. We would like the message "Don't chase loose dogs" to be as effectively ingrained as we are seeing now with education around not leaving dogs in hot cars.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We don’t use any of these practices

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

The Retrievers
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Retrievers

Board of directors
as of 05/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jennifer Cadigan

The Retrievers

Jessica Peterson

Jennifer Cadigan

Lynn Walton

Courtney Raney

Mary MacCarthy

Lindsay Hartman

Bobbi Woelpern

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.