Ho'ōla Nā Pua

aka Ho`ola Na Pua   |   Honolulu, HI   |  https://www.hoolanapua.org/

Mission

Hoʻōla Nā Pua is committed to the prevention of sex trafficking and providing care for children who have been exploited.

Ruling year info

2014

President

Mrs. Jessica Munoz

Main address

P.O. Box 22551

Honolulu, HI 96823 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-5139164

NTEE code info

Group Home (Long Term (P73)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sex trafficking in Hawaii is not a myth. Due to a lack of awareness about the issue, lagging national response, misidentification, and the absence of tailored therapeutic treatment modalities to meet their recovery needs, children who have been exploited continue to be re-exploited. We need to H.E.A.R their voices to bring change around this issue with appropriate responses to their needs so the cycle of abuse and violence can end.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Prevention Education

Through our Education Program, schools receive instruction and training for students, educators, and staff across five school districts. Our presentations provide prevention and awareness about what sex trafficking is, how to identify it, and how to reach out for help. Through the feedback on our student surveys, we have found that 75% of students report having received education on CSEC for the first time.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Hoʻōla Nā Pua's facility will provide a comprehensive, holistic therapy plan for each resident who is placed within our care. Safety is our primary concern working with this population. Residents will be provided with a safe place to heal as their physical, emotional, psychological, psychosocial, spiritual, educational, and reintegration needs are met. Our goal is to prepare each resident for successful transition and reintegration back into our community. Our comprehensive program embraces the Hawaiian value of lokahi (unity, balance, and harmony). Healthy recovery and restoration from severe trauma requires a comprehensive approach to healing.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

The School Educational Program is Hoʻōla Nā Pua’s version of stranger danger for teens. The School Education Program goes directly into local middle schools, high schools, and community youth programs to teach teens what domestic sex trafficking of minors is and how to recognize the signs before it happens to them or someone they know. School Education Program also addresses pornography and other cultural norms that are fueling the demand for underage girls and concludes with suggestions on how students can get involved to bring about change.

Population(s) Served
Students

Most health care professionals and leaders routinely surround the scope of the problem and lack understanding on how to effectually intervene. Awareness is the first step in highlighting the issue; however, effectively addressing and systemically altering the current dilemmas surrounding this multifaceted problem requires careful assessment and integration of several crucial components. The integration of best practices, ongoing research, and dynamic protocols, closure of gaps in fragmented aftercare services, and multidisciplinary collaboration with social work and law enforcement is direly needed.
Awareness must be coupled with action. Strategic collaboration with community NGO’s and service providers with efforts to integrate services systemically centered on victims and seeded in trauma informed care is necessary. Holistically addressing this problem requires a four-pronged methodology not only of awareness and education, but also including limiting supply (prevention), decreasing demand (prosecution), and improving the process of rescue and restoration of victims’ lives. Leaders in the medical community own a responsibility to appropriately identify, effectively address, and integrate the practices necessary for comprehensive patient outcomes in this health and human well-being issue.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Starfish Mentoring Program: is our outpatient trauma-informed, health centric mentoring program addressing the rehabilitation needs of sexually trafficked survivors, the lack of available therapeutic services for this population, and the need to provide survivors with one-on-one support and counseling from a trusted, non-judgmental, appropriate adult mentor.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Cades Schutte Nonprofit Leadership 2016

The Cades Foundation

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of evaluations conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Prevention Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We survey students pre and post training to determine the effectiveness of our presentations and what students take away from the training. We consistently show a need for more training in schools.

Number of coalition meetings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Victims and oppressed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Ho'ola Na Pua is a member of the statewide Coalition Against Human Trafficking, the Attorney General's Human Trafficking Task Force, and the legislative Women's Coalition.

Total number of conferences held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Domestic workers

Related Program

Prevention Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This symposium raised awareness of sex trafficking among the hotel sector of the tourism industry and increased the ability of industry leaders to recognize and assist a victim of sex trafficking.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Hoʻōla Nā Pua, meaning “New Life for Our Children,” is committed to the prevention of sex trafficking and
providing care for children who have been exploited. Since our establishment in 2013, HNP has developed and
implemented innovative, and responsive approaches through community-based programs designed to address
prevention and direct care for youth who have been or are at high risk for being sexually exploited.

Hoʻōla Nā Pua's core programs are designed to provide a continuum of care before, during, and after exploitation.

Our prevention programs include instruction and training through educational presentations to middle schools and high schools throughout the state of Hawai'i.

We assist in the intervention of trafficking by training law enforcement agencies, health centers, hospials, mental health providers, child welfare non-profits, the tourism industry, and concerned caregivers on identification and response.

Our psychoeducational group services and one-to-one mentoring programs serve at-risk youth or victims of commercial sexual exploitation.

The opening of the first residential treatment facility for commercially exploited girls in Hawaii will help fill a gap in services that the state needs.

Through our Education Program, schools receive instruction and training for students, educators, and staff across five school districts. Our presentations provide prevention and awareness about what sex trafficking is, how to identify it, and how to reach out for help. Through the feedback on our student surveys, we have found that 75% of students report having received education on sex trafficking for the first time.

Our Direct Service Programs provides one-to-one mentoring and group services to youth ages 8-24 who are at-risk or victims of sex trafficking. Activities are based on a resiliency framework with the aim of preventing further victimization and building life skills to increase success in social reintegration. We provide individual mentoring when youth are referred to us and we conduct weekly group mentoring in residential facilities. Research shows that youth involved in the juvenile justice and/or child welfare systems are at higher risk for sex trafficking and many of these youth are in residential facilities.

In a broader initiative, we provide survivor-informed presentations and professional trainings at events statewide to increase awareness of sex trafficking. We currently employ an individual who is a survivor of exploitation who provides testimony about her experience to social service and health care providers, and the community at large. Survivor leadership is essential for positive impact and creating lasting systemic change around public education and awareness, therapeutic programming, research, and provides a holistic understanding of the complexities around sex trafficking. Over 25,000 community members have been reached through HNP presentations and trainings and 79% of survey respondents who attended professional training said they were more likely to recognize sex trafficking post-training.

The facility renovations are nearly complete, and we have been given a long term lease by the State.
We are so close to completing our Capital Campaign!

Record of Services and Progress 2014-2016 and Accomplishments

• Volunteer engagement: With over 1000 community members signed on as willing volunteers, 300 are vetted, trained and active; the core organizational team of 20 (executive to operational from across the U.S) serves daily and donates between 20-40 hours per week. To date, over 22,000 hours of professional volunteer hours have been logged, which has been estimated at close to one million dollars.
• Education: more than 15,000 people at more than 90 events and more than 6,000 students in nearly 100 classrooms and assemblies.
• Medical, Service Provider and Law Enforcement Training: for over 3500 emergency physicians and providers nationwide. Coached over 1000 service providers and 200 law enforcement personnel with training on identification and intervention for suspected sex trafficking victims. Our trainings and publications have not been limited to Hawai'i, but have extended to national audiences.
• Serve as a member: of the Hawai'i Coalition against Human Trafficking (HCAHT), a legislatively convened anti-trafficking work group, facilitated in conjunction with the Hawai'i Attorney General's Office.
• Served: over a dozen girls in our outpatient mentorship program.
• Islands wide reach: Trained and provide case consultation to all of the neighbor islands on exploitation of children in our State.
• Started a parents support group for parents of adolescents who have been victimized- May, 2016

Significant Milestones

• Received a Certificate of Need from the State Hospital Planning Department
• Completed the PEARLS Program documentation required for licensing
• Obtained a viable site lease that exceeded expectations
• Obtained an approval for the Environmental Assessment
• Hired staff for administrative and financial accountability
• Exceeded $900,000 in fundraising in less than 2 years of operation
• Received grants from organizations and foundations from $5000-$110,000
• Achieved first steps for a capital campaign launch
• Supported by a team of pro bono architects and professional consultants to achieve construction readiness
• Formalization and implementation of our outpatient mentorship program for victims

Still to be accomplished
• Raise the 6million needed for the capital campaign
• Fully staffed and funded organization- continue to build operational capacity
• Building permits to begin the renovation of Pearl Haven
• Recruitment and training of staff for the Pearl Haven Campus

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Ho'ōla Nā Pua
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Ho'ōla Nā Pua

Board of directors
as of 1/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Chuck Harris

Jeremy Munoz

Independent Building Contractor

Aaron Schnobrich

self-employed

Chuck Harris

Micheal Hogan

Laura Esslinger

Sterling Lee

Kaleo Scheider

Susan Utsugi

Patrick Boyce

Bill Placke

Michelle Stoffle

Jeremy Munoz

Kanakolu Noa

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/20/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/20/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.