WHITE PONY EXPRESS

All of us taking care of all of us

aka White Pony Express   |   Pleasant Hill, CA   |  www.whiteponyexpress.org

Mission

White Pony Express (WPE) exists as a response to relieve the suffering caused by food insecurity and because our society has fallen short in providing basic needs for everyone equally. WPE’s mission is to eliminate hunger and poverty by delivering the abundance all around us to those in need. We bridge abundance and need by diverting wholesome food and other goods from landfills and delivering this bounty to food deserts and under-resourced communities, leading to improved health and well-being.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Eve Birge

Main address

3380 Vincent Road #107

Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-5220565

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Recycling (C27)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Feeding our Neighbors and Improving the Air We Breathe by Reducing Food Waste. WPE levels the playing field for individuals and families who have been left behind by circumstances beyond their control. The majority of the 120,000 people per year that we serve need emergency food. Many are in crisis and all are food insecure. WPE breaks the cycle of malnutrition and associated chronic health and psychological issues, while simultaneously preventing harmful emissions from entering our atmosphere. Rescuing food combats climate change and helps the environment. Between 30% to 40% of America’s food supply goes to waste. When this food decays in landfills, it produces methane, a greenhouse gas at least 28 times more potent than carbon dioxide. In the U.S. alone, the production of wasted food generates the equivalent of 32.6 million cars worth of dangerous greenhouse gas emissions, and 8% of all human-caused greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced if we stop wasting food.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Rescue

Our Food Rescue program meets the challenge that food markets face – what to do with surplus fresh food – to solve the problem of hunger. Our donors provide 15,000 lbs. of high-quality surplus food every day. We pick up this surplus food and deliver it to over 80 organizations serving those in need. We operate 7 days a week, 364 days per year. During the COVID-19 pandemic, we expanded to meet the spike in community need, doubling and tripling food donations. Our food donation partners include grocery stores, distributors, farmers markets, restaurants, and other food retailers.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people

Our General Store program distributes new and like-new clothing, shoes, emergency supplies, educational toys, and books. We have brought 60 unique pop-up “Mobile Boutiques” to neighborhoods in need, offering a personalized and joyful shopping experience. In winter, our Cold Weather Program provides life-saving warm clothing, backpacks, and supplies. WPGS offers a comprehensive Children’s Program and an initiative focused on our unhoused neighbors.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Awards

Nonprofit of the Year 2018

CA Senate District 7

Andrus Award 2019

AARP

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of accolades/recognition received from third-party organizations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Foster and adoptive children, Immigrants and migrants, Veterans

Related Program

Food Rescue

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020, Dr. Carol Weyland Conner was presented with AARP's 2019 Andrus Award for Community Service. In 2018 we were named California's nonprofit of the year by CA Senator Steve Glazer.

Number of suppliers with whom the SME/Coop/Enterprise has an agreement, contract, or ongoing business relationship as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Food Rescue

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of carbon emissions prevented (estimated by CO2 equivalent)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food Rescue

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since our inception, WPE's 20 million pounds of food rescued and averted from landfills saved 303 tons of CO2e from filling the air.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Food Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since inception in 2013, White Pony Express had rescued 18 million pounds of nutritious, fresh food and distributed it through 80+ recipient agencies.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Children, Immigrants, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

Food Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WPE is focused on rectifying rampant food injustice by providing socially and culturally appropriate food choices to communities in Contra Costa County that face the greatest obstacles. These include the unhoused, new immigrants, isolated seniors, children and families, survivors of abuse, students, people with special needs, foster youth, and other marginalized groups. In 2021, WPE rescued more than 4.7 million pounds of food and distributed it so over 120,000 unique individuals.

Special Initiatives
WPE’s programs and projects support our goal to build a sustainable food system, providing food access to the food insecure.

School Pantry Program
Within our Food Rescue Program, WPE’s School Pantry Program tackles the problem of hunger among low-income children and their families. WPE delivers 600-800 pounds of food twice a week to 14 under-resourced schools. Participating schools are in low-income communities with over 80% of students qualifying for free or reduced-price lunch. School administrators have noted improvements in learning, reading retention, attendance, participation, and behavior. We aim to expand this program to more schools in our community.

Food Rescue Hero App
To meet the ever-growing community need for food, WPE has launched an innovative app-based initiative called Food Rescue Hero (FRH). We know that grocers, caterers, restaurants, and farmers throw away tons of food they are unable to sell. The FRH Initiative is a pioneering technology solution connecting food producers’ surplus with available volunteer food runners. It works like Uber, only for free food distribution! Food producers with surplus food get connected with one of our non-profit partners in need of that type of food, and the run is published on the FRH app. Available food runners are pinged when there’s a delivery and can claim the run. It all happens in real time and will exponentially increase both our volunteer ranks and the amount of food we are able to distribute to those in need. It is guaranteed to further reduce food waste at restaurants, hotels, caterers, cafeterias, and other food purveyors. Our goal is to spread FRH’s use throughout the county.

Responding to California Legislation on Food Waste
California S.B. 1383 became law on January 1, 2022. The law requires California food purveyors to recover 20% of edible food otherwise bound for landfills by 2025. Currently, there is no state or local funding earmarked for food rescue organizations, but WPE is committed to its successful roll-out and implementation.

Development of a “How-to” Kit for Creating a Food Rescue
We also aim to replicate our food rescue model. While there are people who would like to do something about food waste, they don’t know what to do. In response, WPE is developing a kit to help communities set up and operate a food rescue service. The kit will be easy-to-follow and inspirational. Disseminating this how-to kit will expand the food recovery movement the world over.

Our current organizational objective is to position White Pony Express to successfully manage and integrate the growth it has experienced since the onset of the pandemic and to prepare for the anticipated growth to come in 2022 and 2023.

To meet the objective, our strategy is to continue to enhance, grow, and improve WPE’s infrastructure using best practices to attain a ‘gold standard’ operation that can be easily replicated.

Programmatic Objectives
To inaugurate the Food Rescue Hero program and engage at least 200 active users on the app by 2023.
To develop a new model for clothing and goods that is aligned with the food rescue model and enables pre-pandemic distribution levels.
Customer/Constituent Objectives
To increase the volunteer base by 20% by 2023.
To actively participate in and influence the public policy arena related to Senate Bill 1383.
Financial Objectives
To increase financial and in-kind donations by 15% by 2023.
To align accounting and financial management with industry best practices.
Internal/Operational Objectives
To increase efficiency through integrated data and improved technology, including deploying a new CRM, by 2023.
To expand targeted communication among our various audiences to achieve respective and specific goals.

WPE will define, plan, and execute on the organization’s naturally occurring growth in every phase of its business, including:
• Program development
• Financial management and reporting
• Integrated data system and improved technology
• Increased donor funds and in-kind donations

To meet our goals, WPE capabilities include an experienced staff, 400 volunteers, a strong board of directors, a robust balance sheet, and long-term food donor partners to sustain our growth trajectory.

Since our inception, WPE has rescued 20.4 million pounds of food from landfills, saving 22,500 tons of CO2e from filling the air. In just 8 years, our small but mighty team of 17 staff, dedicated volunteers, and 10 vehicles have rescued and delivered fresh, high-quality food—enough for more than 17.5 million meals! WPE has distributed 950,000+ items of clothing, shoes, books, and educational toys. Through our partners, and powered by 400+ volunteers, our growing circle of giving serves 120,000+ people in our community annually.
Specifically, our progress has included:
- Holding 34+ Mobile Boutique events,
- Distributing 700,000+ clothing items, toys, and books.
- Building a base of 400+ community volunteers.
- Partnering with 100+ food, toy, and clothing donors.
- Partnering with 80+ nonprofits, through whom we serve 120,000 neighbors in need.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our 80+ regular recipient agencies serve a wide range of demographics and include shelters, community centers, senior living facilities, foster youth programs, homes for people with disabilities, and under-resourced schools. These agencies serve the unhoused, new immigrant families, foster youth, survivors of abuse, low-income families, veterans, people in recovery and re-entry programs, and other vulnerable populations.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The new Food Rescue Hero (FRH) program will help thousands of food-insecure people by providing us with a new food donation model. Since COVID started, WPE has nearly tripled our food rescue and delivery services, providing nearly 5 million pounds of fresh, healthy food annually. Through the efforts of our deeply dedicated team, we added a second large volunteer shift each day, allowing us to add 30 agencies to our food distribution schedule. Unfortunately, we still have 10 agencies on our waiting list. The supply is there, the demand is there, and we are working around the clock. We are only limited by our program’s operational capacity. FHR creates an innovative, decentralized system for food distribution that will increase our ability to connect and serve the community.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

WHITE PONY EXPRESS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WHITE PONY EXPRESS

Board of directors
as of 11/06/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Robert Carpenter

(Retired) President and CEO of Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE)

Term: 2020 - 2023


Board co-chair

MD. Gwendolyn Hamilton

Retired (Peditrician

Term: 2021 - 2023

Isa Campbell

Cindy Gershen

MDUSD

Lorraine Granit

Brad Smith

RCI-Properties

James May

Gwendolyn Hamilton, M.D.

Robert Carpenter

(Retired) Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation

Brant Watson

Heffernan Group

Colin McKie

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/26/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data