GOLD2022

International Network for Aid Relief and Assistance Inc

aka INARA   |   New York, NY   |  www.inara.org

Mission

INARA's vision is a world where no child impacted by conflict is left untreated. INARA seeks to improve the lives of conflict impacted children and their physical and mental health through financial support and increased access to services. INARA works with children from conflict areas who have suffered from physical and mental harm. INARA provides them with access to life-altering medical care and fully covers and finances their treatment until they are fully healed. INARA also provides in-house mental health services to help children cope with and process their trauma. INARA’s mission is to fill in the gaps in access to life changing medical & mental health services by sponsoring care for conflict impacted children.

Ruling year info

2015

President

Ms. Arwa Damon

Main address

845 Riverside Drive, #12B

New York, NY 10032 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-5355232

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (E12)

Surgery (G9B)

Health Support Services (E60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

INARA is working to address the huge gaps in medical care and treatment for children from war torn regions. INARA works with refugee children to provide medical care and support to those whose treatments are not being covered by other organizations and who could otherwise not access such care and treatment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Medical Program

The medical program seeks to improve refugee children’s physical health and quality of life through financial support and increased access to services. The criteria to be accepted into INARA’s medical program are:
• Must be a child (0-18 years of age)
• Have an injury or burn from war, conflict, blasts, or refugee living conditions
• Or are a child with special needs, including persons with disabilities

Through established partnerships with secondary and tertiary health care institutions, INARA facilitates access to already existing medical services to secure appointments and continued care at reduced rates. The program fully covers and finances beneficiaries’ medical treatment, giving them free of charge healthcare. In addition to covering major surgeries, INARA provides children with any medication, medical equipment (such as prosthetic, glass eyes, hearing aids), diagnostic testing, transportation and accommodation prior/post-surgery, and other therapeutic regimens (physiotherapy).

Additionally, INARA pairs each beneficiary with a case manager who creates a medical treatment plan, arranges and attends all appointments, ensures medicines are being properly taken and any physical therapy recommendations are followed, and overall provides a support system for the child and family.

INARA provides cost-effective care that will ultimately allow children to recover from their injuries or illness and to become confident, productive and independent members of their society. INARA follows and supports cases from the beginning of treatment to the end, including through the rehabilitation stages, which can take years.

Population(s) Served

Through this program, INARA provides in-house mental health services to help medical program beneficiaries, as well as vulnerable conflict impacted children in need of mental health care only, cope with and process their trauma.

INARA has child safe spaces in its offices in Turkey and Lebanon that are used for provision of care by INARA’s team of specialized psychologists and psychiatrists. At the start of the child’s journey, INARA screens each beneficiary to assess the need and establish a treatment plan. INARA’s licensed clinical child and adolescent psychologist, or physiatrist then provide one to one mental health services in accordance with the severity of need.

By providing in-house mental health services, INARA provides holistic care for its beneficiaries and increases their access to quality and affordable mental health assessments and services. These services are provided by specialist psychologists and psychiatrists and specifically tailored to children who have severe injuries and trauma. Emotional and psychological trauma symptoms are reduced and children’s mental well-being is improved, creating a lasting impact on the child and their family.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Children and youth

Through this program, INARA redirects a portion of its resources to respond to crises and emergencies within its areas of operation.

The program was used in response to the COVID-19 pandemic to provide food and hygiene kits to over 1,500 vulnerable refugee families in Turkey and Lebanon. INARA also deployed this program after the Beirut Blast in Lebanon in August 2020. After the Blast, INARA set up a medical station near the blast site for a month to provide advanced first aid and medical check-up to over 1,000 people from the devastated community as well as distribute water and PPE.


Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Refugees and displaced people
Immigrants and migrants
Refugees and displaced people
Immigrants and migrants
Refugees and displaced people

Where we work

Awards

Crisis Award 2017

World of Children

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

INARA’s goals are to:

1) To treat injured children with life-threatening or life-altering conditions or injuries that came as a result of conflict or the refugee context.

2) To refer injured children to other organisations providing medical services for refugees as needed.

3) To build an extensive network of medical professionals and institutions in the MENA region to support INARA's work.

INARA’s strategy for achieving Goal 1 and 2 is as follows:

1. Identify: INARA identifies cases through a referral network of humanitarian organizations, medical providers and other professionals in the field.
2. Vet: All cases referred to INARA are assessed and vetted to determine urgency, severity, and whether they meet INARA’s criteria. Once we accept a case, we take on the responsibility of case management. When cases fall outside of our medical criteria, INARA strives to make a referral to other organizations to take on the case, following up when needed.
3. Facilitate: Each beneficiary is assigned a dedicated INARA caseworker who connects the case to the appropriate medical service provider. INARA fully finances the medical treatment and logistical costs. After the treatment, we follow up on the case with the appropriate rehabilitation.
4. Monitor and Evaluate: All cases are monitored, and the beneficiary’s progress is evaluated against medical treatment outcomes as well as quality of life.

To meet Goal 3, INARA's strategy is to connect with both new and trusted medical institutions and other NGOs as well as maintain existing relationships in Lebanon and Turkey.

INARA has over five years of experience of establishing partnerships and relationships with doctors and hospitals and of setting up treatment and managing cases of children in need of reconstructive surgery, laser therapy to treat scarring, and tertiary and quaternary blast injuries. We have partnered with some extremely qualified health professionals and organisations, such as the American University of Beirut Medical Centre (AUBMC) and the MMT American Hospital.

Our caseworkers work in collaboration with medical professionals to outline a customised treatment plan for each case. Each patient's progress is carefully monitored to ensure successful completion of the treatment plan. Once cases are referred to INARA, our caseworkers will establish the link between the child and medical providers. We follow those who are taken on as an INARA case from the beginning of treatment to the end, including through the rehabilitation stages.

At the end of 2019, INARA has provided care and medical treatment to 361 children.

INARA is also an active member of the United Nations Interagency Coordination Unit in Lebanon through which partner organizations work closely on coordinating and strengthening their health programming and referral efforts. Whenever an organization comes across a case of a child that fits our criteria, they refer it on to us. In 2019, 36% of children referred to INARA were from UN agencies (UNHCR, UNICEF, UNRWA) and 23% came from local and international organizations. Additionally, if we come across a child that is in need of a service INARA is not offering (such as child protection, legal support, etc.) we rely on our well-established referral system to find appropriate support for the concerned child.

INARA’s staff also spend time building their network and raising awareness of INARA’s work to find potential new partner hospitals and doctors. INARA staff are part of UN working groups and regularly schedule meetings with different hospitals around Turkey and Lebanon.

INARA has accomplished a huge amount since its establishment in 2015. We have expanded and now have operations in both Lebanon and Turkey. Additionally, at the end of 2019, INARA helped 361 children in just five years.

For future plans, INARA is looking to launch a mental health services program in both countries to further support beneficiaries and provide wholistic care and expand services to operate inside of Syria.

There are still many injured children in the MENA region who need INARA’s help. We are constantly fundraising and looking for funding opportunities to continue to support our operations. We hope that as INARA grows more of these children will be treated and we will be one step closer to ensuring that no child lives with injuries caused by war.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

International Network for Aid Relief and Assistance Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

International Network for Aid Relief and Assistance Inc

Board of directors
as of 05/23/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Arwa Damon

CNN

Term: 2015 -

Luna Madi

Ghassan Abu Sittah

AUBMC

Luna Madi

Amanda Seyfried

Thomas Sadoski

Kim Kelaita

Yo-Hann Tan

SE Cupp

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/23/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/03/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.