Holy Name Housing Corporation

Building strong communities one home at a time

aka HNHC   |   Omaha, NE   |  www.holynamehousing.org

Mission

The mission of Holy Name Housing is to provide quality affordable housing options and homeownership education in Omaha and surrounding communities. To strengthen neighborhoods and empower individuals and families to be informed responsible residents. To respect all residents’ rights to quality affordable housing in a safe and healthy community.

Ruling year info

1983

Executive Director

Mr Matthew Cavanaugh

Main address

4324 Fort St

Omaha, NE 68111 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-0653390

NTEE code info

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Financial Counseling, Money Management (P51)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The biggest challenge in the community we serve is overcoming obstacles to stable, affordable housing including a high concentration of households below the poverty level and a lack of knowledge in financial basics.

Most of our tenants' families of origin did not own their homes – so most tenants have no knowledge of the homeownership process or the advantages to owning a home.

Tenants come to HNHC with little or no experience with banking (90% of our tenants are unbanked), credit, or mortgage process knowledge.

Traditionally housing "should" cost no more than 30 percent of a family's income. Yet for lower income families (particularly those in or near poverty) if they are renting, that goal is hard to reach.

The population we serve are experiencing an increase in gaps in static wages, cut backs in work hours and increases in the cost of living (with no COL adjustment), increase in credit problems, lack of savings to meet emergency needs and an inability to save.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CROWN (Credit to Own)

HNHC’s core program is its Crown (Credit to Own) program. This program, through a lease agreement, offers tenants an affordable place to live, an escrow account as part of each month's rental payment (to use towards home purchase) and supportive services. It is a single family housing program that allows tenants (earning 60% of the area median income or less) to rent a (3 or 4 bedroom) home for an affordable rent ($550-$615/month). As part of the Crown Program the tenant must agree, as a part of the lease, to work towards homeownership. Many tenants do not understand the home buying process, lack sufficient resources to meet the financial obligations of conventional underwriting and/or are unable to sustain homeownership. HNHC offers the Crown Program to prepare its tenants to overcome these obstacles.

Tenants must attend three workshops a year as a part of a lease agreement. The curriculum for these workshops is designed to give tenants an introduction to financial, rental, maintenance and community involvement basics: Financial basics include: budgeting, banking, financial responsibilities/accountability, credit scores, credit reports, preparing and saving for emergencies, and mortgage lending. Rental basics include: how to read a lease, paying rent on time, taking care of your home, and home maintenance basics. Crown tenants get the opportunity to meet each other, exchange ideas and establish a sense of community. Community Partners (i.e. OneOmaha, North Omaha Neighborhood Association (NONA), Empowerment Network, Omaha Police Department, Charles Drew, Family Housing Advisory Services and Omaha 100) also attend HNHC’s “Community Matters” workshops to introduce their mission to the tenants and to describe the importance of being part of community efforts in building strong neighborhoods. HNHC stresses to its tenants the importance of being involved in their neighborhoods and the necessity of being good stewards of the homes HNHC rents to them. This creates a sense of pride and ownership, which in turn builds strong communities.

As part of their lease, tenants sign a maintenance agreement that states they are responsible for minor home maintenance in their rental home. A Homeownership Plan must also be completed that states their desired homeownership goals for the year. The workshops, coupled with one on one counseling/case management with HNHC’s Director of Supportive Services assist tenants in becoming educated and empowered and ideally purchasing a home within 3-5 years.

By taking a holistic approach to homeownership by equipping our residents with the skills necessary to
purchase and sustain a home and by teaching them to be good stewards of their property and of the neighborhoods in which they live is a win-win for the resident, the neighborhood and the City of Omaha.

Holy Name Housing’s Crown Program has been a successful response to making housing opportunities available to low income households (under 60% of the area median income) in Northeast Omaha and aligns with HNHC’s mission. HNHC has a portfolio of 175 Crown single family homes and is building 30 more homes with construction completion slated for late 2016.

The Crown program has been very successful but with the increasing gap between static wages, cut backs in working hours and the increase in the cost of living, the path to homeownership for many of our Crown tenants is taking longer than in previous years. The original goal was for tenants to be homeowner-ready in 3-5 years; it is now taking an average of 5-7 years.

Population(s) Served
Adults

A pilot program launched by HNHC in 2014. Three 4-bedroom homes were constructed on 20th Street near downtown Omaha. The intention of the SEP program was to provide housing for those making over our current target market (60% area median income). The concept of “sharing the equity” is similar to the rent to own aspect of the Crown program.
SEP is a program in which Holy Name Housing Corporation (HNHC) and the tenant share in the equity of property to fulfill the tenant’s goal of home ownership. The description of how the equity is shared is as follows:
The initial cost of the home (“equity”) is paid for by HNHC through various funding sources (including NDED NAHTF). The tenant will enter into a rental lease agreement with HNHC for five years that includes mandatory homeownership training requirements.

At the end of the five-year lease period, provided the lease has not been terminated and the tenant is not in default under any of the terms or conditions of the lease, the tenant will have the option to purchase the home. The tenant and HNHC will “share” equally in the initial cost of home (equity) – HNHC pays upfront to build the home and the tenant will pay their portion of equity by obtaining a home mortgage. The sales price to the tenant will be equal to the remaining debt on the home. This amount will be less than half of the original equity. The amount will be approximately $100,000.

The plan is for the tenant to be prepared to obtain a mortgage after the fifth year by working with support services on budgeting, credit and other homeownership training throughout their tenancy.

During the lease period, the tenant will be required to maintain the home as it is their own, maintaining the equity or even increasing the equity over time. Any unused replacement reserves held by HNHC at the end of the five years, will be used by the tenant to cover closing costs or used as down payment assistance for the home. HNHC will also direct the tenant to other sources of down payment assistance in the community.

Just like any home owner, the tenant will face costs increases in rent/mortgage on the home. HNHC will share (pass on) any increases in property taxes or property insurance increasing their rental payment. The changes in property taxes and property insurance will be reflected in a 3% per year rent increase.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

HNHC identified the need for senior housing in the area as the population is aging and many households are unable to continue to live in and care for their homes. HNHC has built and currently manages the following for low income seniors in North Omaha (55 and older): Leo Vaughan Manor 37 units, Fontenelle Cottages 12 units, Adams Park Cottages 18 units, North Omaha Senior Cottages I & II (44 units) on the campus of the old St. Richard’s school and home to HNHC’s corporate offices.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with disabilities

Supportive services available to HNHC’s senior tenants provided at the North Omaha Intergenerational Campus (collaboration with HNCH and Heartland Family Service (HFS)) include: Charles Drew community health center services, Heartland Family Service Generations Center with meals and other activities and individual counseling from HNHC’s Director of Supportive Services as needed.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

CROWN (Credit to Own)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of staff members certified in subject area training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

CROWN (Credit to Own)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Certified Rentwise Trainers

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Construct housing that is decent, safe, and permanently affordable for low-income residents;

Restore unused, vacant, in-fill lots to become a neighborhood asset.

Educate renters on financial / credit / mortgage basics / homeownership counseling

Offer renters a real plan to own a home;

Construct housing that is decent, safe, and permanently affordable for low-income residents; Restore unused, vacant, in-fill lots to become a neighborhood asset.

Obtain land at a reasonable cost in order to build an affordable home for low income residents. In doing so, this would restore unused, vacant and infill lots that become a neighborhood asset.

Educate renters on financial / credit / mortgage basics / homeownership counseling: Holy Name Housing's Crown supportive services offer training in money management and case management.

Offer renters a real plan to own a home; As part of a lease agreement, residents are required to attend financial and homeownership counseling. As a part of this plan, residents will create a working document (plan) that states goals to meet each year. Follow up meetings with Support Services Manager to assess goals is completed at least annually to ensure progress.

The current management has the proven ability to manage additional development related activities. HNHC’s staff is experienced in working with a variety of funding sources with different compliance and reporting requirements, working efficiently and consistently performing above industry standards with low vacancy and delinquency rates.

The Executive Director is in his third year with the organization and has proved his capability in managing additional developments – 2 housing developments added to the HNHC portfolio since his hire. There have been no outstanding compliance reporting or financial issues with HNHC’s portfolio since his hire. To date he has managed staff that consistently performed above housing industry standards with low vacancy and delinquency rates.

The Compliance and Property Manager has been in the management arena for over 15 years and has managed low income housing tax credit, HOME, and conventional / market rate housing. Her vast compliance knowledge, experience in reporting requirements for various funding sources and longevity in the industry gives her the ability to manage any additional developments and related activities for HNHC. She has recently passed the HCCP exam and will be applying for her credentials as a Housing Credit Certified Professional (HCCP).

The Director of Development and Administrative Services has over 25+ years in the housing industry. Her background includes: compliance for various funding sources (CDBG, HOME, LIHTC, AHP, NAHTF etc.), property management, syndication, project development, compliance and reporting. She has been a Housing Credit Certified Professional (HCCP) for the last 20 years, her vast industry knowledge and longevity and experience in the industry lends itself to HNHC’s capability of managing additional developments and related activities.

The Controller has over 30+ years in accounting and office management oversight. Her longevity in the business and assistance to the Executive Director in navigating the housing portfolio finances has proven to be very successful since her hire. HNHC has improved its tenant collection procedures, developed organizational controls and improved reporting to a variety of funders/financers.

In its 34 year history, HNHC has demonstrated its commitment to the area it serves as well as its capacity to develop quality affordable housing by having:

Renovated 224 and constructed 337 single family houses;

Renovated an historic building as 37 units and constructed 56 cottages for low income seniors;

Provided financing (formation of million dollar low interest mortgage pool and established Omaha 100, a consortium of local financial institutions) and supportive services that would enable families to purchase their own homes;

Enabled reinvestment in the neighborhood by assisting 460 families to purchase HNHC built or rehabbed homes;

Partnered with other organizations focused on revitalizing Omaha neighborhoods;

Held 3 workshops a year for CROWN tenants

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Holy Name Housing Corporation
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Holy Name Housing Corporation

Board of directors
as of 6/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr Joe Johns

First National Bank

Term: 2017 - 2020


Board co-chair

Mr Daniel Boler

American National Bank

Term: 2020 - 2022

Clint Cadwallader

McGrath North

Wes Hutcherson

Union Pacific / Salem Baptis

Jordan Raynor

BKD, LLP

Ronda Hill

Neighborhood Association President

Dr. David Levy

One World Community Health

Julie Smith

Student/Former Program Manager OneOmaha

Dana Washington

Boys Town

Dennis Walsh

Omaha Together One Community

Kimberly White

Metro Community College

Caitlin Cedfeldt

Legal Aid of Nebraska

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/30/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.