PLATINUM2024

Community Justice Center (CJC)

Crime Harms. Restorative Justice Heals.

aka 2001-2005 Changed Name   |   Lincoln, NE   |  http://www.communityjusticecenter.org

Mission

The Community Justice Center’s work heals victims, communities, and offenders through the transformative process of restorative justice.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

James Jones

Program Manager

Rick Carter

Main address

PO Box 22746

Lincoln, NE 68542 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Offender Accountability Synergistic Inactive Services (OASIS)

EIN

47-0830661

NTEE code info

Rehabilitation Services for Offenders (I40)

Victims' Services (P62)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

RJI Victim Impact/Emotional Hygiene Life Skills

We serve everyone involved in the criminal justice system: victims, offenders and the community with healing-centered resources and research-backed education.
Our work keeps thousands of people out of prison, provides a new path for current justice involved people, increases public safety, helps heal victims, and saves the US millions in tax dollars.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

RJI Victim Impact/Emotional Hygiene Life Skills

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Community Justice Center is a Restorative Justice agency committed to habilitating justice in Nebraska.
Our Mission: The mission of the Community Justice Center is to advance community safety, responsibility and healing in the aftermath of harm through restorative justice evidence-based programming and practices.
Restorative Justice is a process to involve, to the extent possible, those who have a stake in a specific offense and to collectively identify and address harms, needs, and obligations, in order to heal and put things as right as possible. Restorative Justice moves harm to healing and hope.

Our approach is grounded in the belief that ALL individuals despite what they have done or whats happened to them are valued and worthy to be restored and made whole as much as possible.
By offering specific tools, training, and education all stakeholders (victims, communities, and justice-involved individuals) have the opportunity to be a part of Restorative Justice. Justice-involved individuals who go through our programs have a responsibility to give back to their community and be more aware and emotionally-equipped.
This shared responsibility allows individuals the opportunity to repair their harm and give back to the community.
Beyond connecting members of the community, restorative justice saves tax dollars, increases public safety, and reduces future harm.

The Community Justice Center Will:
1. Utilize Restorative Justice Principles and Values in all our practices
2. Promote Restorative Justice policies and practices
3. Provide Restorative Justice education and outreach to all stakeholders in the Restorative Justice process
4. Foster a Healing Centered approach to harm centered on what/who has been harmed
5. Address mass incarceration and its causes
6. Reduce recidivism for justice-involved individuals
7. Develop emotional hygiene process for all stakeholders
8. Foster Accountability and Responsibility by those who have harmed
9. Promote Restorative Living

1. Expand Outreach and Awareness-Increase community awareness of CJC programming through targeted outreach and marketing-Increase community awareness of CJC programming through targeted outreach and marketing.
2. Enhance Training and Education-Provide comprehensive training and education to staff, volunteers, and stakeholders that is conducted in a continuous learning cycle and develops cultural competency and inclusivity.
3. Strengthen Program Development and Delivery-Develop and implement new or improved programs that address specific community needs
4. Evaluate and Adjust Operations-Regularly assess the organizations operations, identify areas for improvement, and implement changes to enhance efficiency and effectiveness
5. Financial Sustainability-Develop a sustainable financial plan that includes diversified funding sources, prudent financial management, and a reserve fund for emergencies

The Community Justice Center was founded in 2001, by James Jones and is a Black-founded and Black-led peer organization. Our facilitators are formerly justice-involved individuals who view the work as giving back to our community, those who have been harmed, and peers. The Community Justice Center (CJC) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, restorative justice organization working towards healing in the aftermath of harm. We offer institutional and community programming and healing that serves the needs of stakeholders affected by harm. We provide effective and evidence-based programming, services, and peer facilitation/support in all Nebraska Correctional Institutions, Colorado Department of Corrections, Douglas County Corrections, Sarpy County Corrections, Lancaster County Corrections, with Nebraska Probation Reporting Centers statewide, and in Nebraska communities. Since 2001, we have served more than 17,000 justice-involved individuals.
We are people who have been harmed, people who have harmed, family members, and allies working to implement restorative justice practices within the criminal justice system and in our communities. For over twenty years, we have provided our restorative justice evidence-based programming for justice involved individuals in institutions and communities and resources/support for crime victims and community members.
We serve everyone involved in the criminal justice system: people who have been harmed, people who have harmed, and the community with restorative justice resources and research-backed programming and outreach.

In 2023 CJC:
Delivered 298 Restorative Justice Intervention classes (27% increase from prior year) serving 2,941 (39% increase from previous year) participants in Nebraska Probation, Nebraska Department of Correctional Services, and Douglas County Department of Corrections. Each correctional program conducts a follow-up emotional hygiene support circle/graduation.
The Level-Up gang desistance program graduated 3 cohorts of 30 currently incarcerated former gang members providing ongoing peer and graduate circles of support weekly.
85 Reentry Circles of Support were conducted in community settings with 491 attendees.
58 Individual Reentry Supports were provided to current NDCS Community Corrections residents.

Presented (June 2023) at the International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services conference in Australia, regarding the role of emotional empathy, adverse childhood events and emotional management skills in recidivism rates of released prisoners who participated in a brief restorative justice intervention. Five-year recidivism rates 5.8% were substantially lower than the national norms. Previous research papers published in the International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology with probation and corrections programming showed a 50% lower recidivism rate across 19 years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Community Justice Center (CJC)
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Community Justice Center (CJC)

Board of directors
as of 01/16/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Diane Shottenkirk

LeeAnn Pancharoen

Gary Lamb

CPT Tarvis Banks

Bobby Beltran

Kristen Blankley

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/15/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.