FIT TO RECOVER INC

Exercising Recovery

aka Fit2Recover.org   |   Salt Lake City, UT   |  https://fit2recover.org

Mission

To help individuals maintain long-term recovery from drugs and alcohol through exercise, nutrition awareness, creative endeavors and community service, while supporting each other in a safe and positive environment.

Ruling year info

2014

Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Ian Acker

Main address

789 West 1390 South

Salt Lake City, UT 84104 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-0998466

NTEE code info

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Programs that address Substance Use Disorder (SUD) remain a national health priority. This year the problem has been worse than ever since COVID-19 increased boredom, isolation, and access to support. Fit To Recover helps those in recovery from SUD by offering a safe and active community for those in recovery to engage in physical activity, food and nutritional events, creative endeavors, and community service. Our environment is safe, drug and alcohol free, and filled with supportive community members.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Exercise and Physical Fitness

FTR provides classes in kettle bells, yoga, hi-energy dance, cardiovascular, and bootcamps to help individuals become active regardless of current level of physical fitness or athletic background.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Fit To Recover operates a sound studio and conducts creative writing, music production, and art programs to encourage those in recovery to tell and preserve their stories. The Creative Expression program conducts quarterly performers by members for the benefit of the Greater Salt Lake Community.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Food To Recover provides classes on healthy eating and nutrition, provides recipes, conducts group cooking classes, offers nutritional counseling and tends a community garden.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Giving back is an essential part of recovery, and our membership donated 1,500 hours to Community Service in 2019. We are grateful to those in our surrounds and this is our way of showing gratitude.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

National Impact Award 2016

SCORE/Small Business Administration

Utah Ethical Leadership Award 2019

The Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative at the David Eccles School of Business, University of Utah

2020 SelectHealth Award 2020

Select Health

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Fit To Recover provides community, connection and safety in a supportive environment for those in recovery from Substance Use Disorder (SUD). Our Community Center contains a gym, kitchen, and music studio to serve many interests. Members share their skills in a collaborative peer environment that encourages both support and accountability.

Fit To Recover's fourth pillar is based on Service to our community. We are grateful for community support and giving back in gratitude is foundational for recovery.

Our goal is to continue to expand the number and diversity of individuals we serve within these environments.

Above all we provide a non-judgmental environment that supports a community whose members have “been there,” and who hold each other up and hold each other accountable for their recovery. As a peer-support community, we exchange insights and assistance to each other that are grounded in experience. Further, and as importantly, our community is active and engaged in positive, healthy activities. We help individual members set goals for physical and nutritional health, and provide outlets for creative expression (e.g. storytelling, music performance), and giving back to our larger community (e.g. community service work with food banks and our community garden, and volunteer with the Salt Lake Marathon and other special events). In addition, our Creative Arts programs provides the Deeply Rooted series of Community Performances that feature music, poetry and storytelling surrounded by visual arts as a channel of personal expression and the opportunity to give back to our audiences and community.

We have a 5,500 sq. ft. gym and community center complete with a teaching kitchen and small recording studio. Our fitness staff members are certified fitness instructors led by an Advanced Substance Use Disorder (ASUD) certified trainer. Those who teach cooking and meal preparation are registered dietitians, and our Creative Arts program is led by a music therapist who holds a Masters Degree in Art Therapy. We participate in a network of other organizations that serve the recovery community. Finally, we are able and willing to travel to the sites of others, providing programs at the Oxbow Jail, Summit County Drug Court and a prevention-based program for youth away from our facility. Above all, we are a community of members who share their often remarkable talents with other members when they are in need.

In four years, we have increased the number of people we have served from under 100 when we started to over 5,000 we have now served; this is our greatest accomplishment. Further, we have steadily increased the number of treatment centers with whom we work from 3 to 15 in our five years of existence. We have introduced a program with the Oxbow Jail and the Summit County Drug Court to provide weekly workouts for both male and female low-level drug offenders in their custody, and offer an avenue to join the Fit To Recover community upon their release from jail.

When COVID-19 suspended our face-face programs from March-July in 2020, we created a virtual gym to support our members with multiple weekly classes. Our nutrition program cooked and delivered meals to our members and their families when we were unable to cook together.

What's next? We have offered a pilot program to help other non-profits who wish to start programs similar to FTR's in their own communities. Our first certification was a success, and a Colorado-based CrossFit gym is expanding their offerings to include classes tailored to those in recovery. We ask you to evaluate our progress for yourself—visit our website at https://fit2recover.org , or better yet, visit us in-person at our gym.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    COVID-19 shut down our gym in March of 2019 for in-person attendance. Our Community Advisory Board and member feedback encouraged us to offer virtual classes. We introduced them within two weeks. In July, we were permitted to re-open on a limited basis. We did so, and expanded our class offerings to early morning and weekends so that we could serve our members in the smaller class sizes required.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners, Newsletter readers,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

FIT TO RECOVER INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FIT TO RECOVER INC

Board of directors
as of 4/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Martha Macomber

University of Utah

Term: 2017 - 2020

Jennifer Carlson

Turning Point Centers

Doug McNeil

Interwest Business Group

Stephen Acker

The Ohio State University

Tyler Lamprecht

Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network

Adam Cohen

Odyssey House

Shannon Jones

University of Utah

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/24/2020,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data