PLATINUM2022

Be A Part of The Conversation

Horsham, PA   |  http://conversation.zone

Mission

Be a Part of the Conversation equips families and communities in Pennsylvania with skills and resources to understand substance use, addiction, and related health issues. We provide community programs, foster supportive connections, highlight lived experiences, and challenge stigma.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Kim Porter CFRS

Main address

P.O. Box 8

Horsham, PA 19044 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-1233578

NTEE code info

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our present culture faces a variety of barriers to engaging people in meaningful and effective conversations regarding substance use and related disorders. These realities often engender feelings of fear, denial, or judgment, any of which can keep people in the dark and contribute to the isolation that prevents individuals struggling with substance use from seeking the support and treatment they desperately need. The lack of understanding of risk factors, signs and symptoms of addiction, and pathways to recovery can unnecessarily perpetuate painful and progressive disorders.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Addiction 101

We bring in professionals in the field of addiction who present science-based information to audiences, helping them to understand how addiction develops, and why it is that some people can stop patterns of substance misuse, while others might struggle throughout their lives. Risk factors for addiction and specific vulnerabilities that can be prevented by setting healthy boundaries are addressed. Our presenters also discuss the significance of genetics and environment, and how a rational brain can be hijacked once it is engaged in active addiction.

Population(s) Served
Adults

For parents of elementary school students. This is an ideal time for families to begin important conversations about substance use, with special sensitivity toward young children.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Academics

Vital to the health and well being of every child is an engaged and transparent family dynamic, and yet open, honest conversation are sometimes quite a challenge as children grow older and distance themselves from their parents and other loved ones. This program helps to identify warning signs, determine if there is reason for concern, then engage in effective and informed communication with young people. Professional resources will be made available as needed.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Academics

Be a Part of the Conversation & Minding Your Mind join together to address “dual diagnosis” – the correlation between substance use disorders and mental health challenges. People addicted to drugs are roughly twice as likely to suffer from mood and anxiety disorders, with the reverse also true. Together, we’ll explore paths to recovery from co-occurring disorders, which can be difficult to diagnose due to the complexity of symptoms, as both may vary in severity. In many cases, people receive treatment for one disorder while the other disorder remains untreated.

Population(s) Served
Adults

There is not a community in the United States that hasn’t felt the devastating impact of today’s opioid epidemic. In 2017 alone, we lost more than 70,000 Americans to overdose deaths. That exceeds the number of deaths due to HIV/AIDS, gun violence, suicide, or automobile accidents in any given year. Overdoses from the strongest synthetic opioids, such as fentanyl, have tripled. Together, we will shine a light on this health care emergency that has kept too many families and their loved ones in the dark due to stigma or a lack of understanding about the disease of addiction.

Population(s) Served
Adults

For parents and educators from all school levels. Kids are wired to try new things. The current trend, both nationally and locally, is vaping. Along with an alarming trend toward risk-taking behaviors, this is something we need to have a conversation about, as parents and as a community that cares.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Academics

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of community-based organizations providing primary prevention services in substance abuse

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, Parents, LGBTQ people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to the 2020 pandemic, most programs took place online using the Zoom platform making it difficult to identify the organizations that engaged their communities with our programs.

Number of participants with improved knowledge about smoking and how to reduce it

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, Parents, Teachers

Related Program

Clearing the Air About Vaping

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Requests from schools for our "Clearing The Air About Vaping" program for parents of K-12 kids have reduced each year as awareness about the risks of vaping/smoking has increased.

Number of students receiving information on alcohol and other drug use

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Caregivers, Parents, Teachers, Substance abusers

Related Program

Have You Had the Conversation?

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Parents and educators are the audience in this instance, and research tells us that kids whose caregivers are educated about substance use are approximately 50% less like to misuse substances.

Number of support groups offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, Parents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Increased in 2021 to include 15 groups.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We hope to see as many people as possible equipped with the skills and resources to avoid substance use, misuse or addiction. If such use becomes a reality and a challenge, or if the disease of addiction has been diagnosed, those individuals and their families will be supported and assisted by a community that is educated and able to take timely and positive action toward healing and lifelong recovery.

Families, educators, students, treatment professionals, clergy, and members of law enforcement and the business community will all have a voice, with the shared goals of:
• raising awareness and understanding of substance use, misuse and addiction
• reducing stigma, which we believe is a barrier to seeking help for substance use disorders
• helping families and educators to foster healthy coping skills in the young people for whom they care
• provide access to support and a variety of resources whenever there is a need
• supporting individuals and their families in their efforts to seek and sustain recovery

Through community and private programs, we educate participants in interactive events that raise awareness about risk factors, preventative measures for parents and educators, methods for early intervention, and pathways to recovery. By serving additional communities, and reaching more individuals in each community we already serve, we will exponentially infuse those populations with a culture of support and understanding.

We have developed vital relationships with county drug and alcohol departments, other organizations and agencies, educational institutions, treatment professionals, health care providers, and other respected leaders who have partnered with us since 2011 to act as a vital resource for community members as, together, we increase awareness surrounding substance use, misuse and addiction. Our staff and volunteers are well trained and are dedicated to serving individuals and families throughout southeastern Pennsylvania.

Since our inception in 2011, we have seen a consistently growing demand for our programs. Each year we add new community partners, new private businesses that request our programs, new school districts that engage us to present timely topics to their families and staff, and new topics that meet the needs of an ever-changing landscape of substance use.

Each year, Be a Part of the Conversation (BPOC) presents 40 to 50 programs to communities and workplaces, serving approximately 3,000 individuals annually. A range of topics fall under the areas of prevention, early intervention, substance use or addiction awareness, and supporting pathways to recovery.

Prevention programs are intended for parents, educators and other adults who are concerned about young people. These topics help attendees to learn about the risks of substance use among youth, and important protective factors, such as fostering resiliency, effective communication skills, and steps to accessing treatment when needed. Here are some of our Prevention Topics:
- "Have You Had the Conversation? How to talk with your kids about substances."
- "Media Messaging & Youth. Living with technology and reconnecting with kids."
- "Parenting On Your Feet"
- "Mock Teen Bedroom"
- "Clearing the Air: Vaping | Nicotine | Marijuana"
- "Cannabis (it's complicated, especially for kids!)"
- "The Trouble with Alcohol & Teens"
- "Isolation: The New Drug of Choice"
- "The Search for Identity / Freedom from Expectations"

Topics Focused on Awareness, Understanding, Intervention & Recovery are extremely helpful for those seeking to understand who is at risk for addiction, why those individuals struggle to stop their use, and how effective interventions and supporting recovery can change the lives of those individuals and their families. Family members concerned about a loved one are frequent attendees and have expressed their gratitude for a deeper understanding of the impact on themselves and their relationships. Here are some of our topics Focused on Awareness, Understanding, Intervention & Recovery:
- "The Trouble with Alcohol and Adults"
- "Addiction 101"
- "Navigating the Maze of Addiction & Mental Health"
- "Being LGBTQIA+ & Healing from Substance Use"
- "The Rising Tide of Stimulants"
- "Shining a Light on the Opioid Epidemic"
- "Embracing the Consequences. When unwanted outcomes become part of the solution."
- "Transforming the Pain Paradigm"
- "Out of Isolation & Into Recovery"
- "Pathways to Recovery"
- "Creative Recovery"

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our community programs draw a diverse audience. For our prevention programs, our audience consists of parents/guardians and educators who are seeking to understand risk and protective factors for children so that they can support healthy choices and avoid substance use. Our programs addressing addiction to drugs and alcohol and related behavioral health concerns draw audiences made up of family members who are concerned about a loved one's substance use. And programs that are presented in partnership with local businesses or faith organizations are conducted on site, so the audience is made up of their employees/constituents.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To learn what brought them to our programs., To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We ask respondents which topics they would like to hear about in the future. The most frequent response is "family boundaries," therefore we make an effort to address that subject with targeted programs, as well as incorporating that aspect into all programs whenever applicable.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has helped us to understand the evolving preference for in-person versus virtual programs. Also, we have been reinforced in our decisions to broaden the scope of our programming.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We receive a healthy number of survey responses, but we would like to hear from a higher percentage.,

Financials

Be A Part of The Conversation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Be A Part of The Conversation

Board of directors
as of 10/16/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Casey Duffy

Dawn Tucker, MS

Jill Adams, SFW

Chris King

Dr. Caroline Fenkel, LCSW

Joe Fenkel

Joe Gaudio, CPA

Lisa Bailey

Doug Leavitt, Esq.

Lisa Mackell, CFRS

Dennis Williams

Casey Duffy

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/16/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/23/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.