Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research

aka Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research   |   Washington, DC   |  https://foundationfar.org/

Mission

FFAR builds unique partnerships to support innovative science addressing today’s food and agriculture challenges.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Dr. Sally Rockey

Main address

401 9th St NW Ste 620

Washington, DC 20004 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-1559027

NTEE code info

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

With 9.7 billion people projected to populate the world by 2050, our food system must evolve. Sustainably nourishing the growing global community demands transformative discoveries from the best and brightest scientists. The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research brings together leading experts to identify and investigate the researchable questions whose answers have the potential to enhance the economic and environmental resilience of our food supply.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Soil Health

Healthy soil is crucial for growing nutritious, affordable food on thriving farms. The Soil Health Challenge Area catalyzes transformative research that addresses knowledge gaps, fuels innovation and enables the adoption of soil management practices. This research explores linkages between soil health and farm productivity, economics, human health, management practices and other areas.

Population(s) Served

Water scarcity is one of the greatest challenges for 21st century agriculture. Sustainably managing water resources is vital to ensuring farms continue to thrive. Research in this Challenge Area supports increasing water availability and water use efficiency, replenishing ground water, reducing water pollution and developing water reuse and recycling technologies.

Population(s) Served

Producers need crops that can efficiently produce greater yields with fewer inputs. To address this challenge, FFAR’s research focuses on developing non-traditional crops, creating new economic opportunities for conventional crops and increasing crop diversity and farm profitability. This research advances novel, nutritious, profitable and resilient crops.

Population(s) Served

Producing nutritious, affordable food on thriving farms requires improving the efficiency of protein production for human or animal consumption. Research in the Advanced Animal Systems Challenge Area supports sustainable animal production through innovative technologies, environmentally-sound production practices and advancements in animal health and welfare.

Population(s) Served

Agriculture is moving from fields to urban environments. The Urban Food Systems Challenge Area enhances our ability to feed city populations. Research in this Challenge Area advances viable solutions to complex problems by looking at multiple aspects of and connections within the food system. This research ultimately aims to reduce food and nutritional insecurity through economically viable and sustainable solutions.

Population(s) Served

The Health-Agriculture Nexus Challenge Area supports innovative, systems-level approaches to reduce food and nutrition insecurity and improve human health in the United States and around the globe. The Health-Agriculture Nexus research area focuses on increasing access to nutritious foods, reducing food loss and waste, advancing plant and animal production systems for better nutrition and affordability and developing crops with high nutritional value.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

FFAR envisions a world in which ever-innovating and collaborative science provides every person access to affordable, nutritious food grown on thriving farms. We believe that by working together, our vibrant research community of nonprofits, foundations, governments, individual researchers and producers, colleges and universities, and companies can support and implement the science we need to meet our common goal: to grow enough food, in an economically, environmentally, and sustainable way, to nourish the growing US and global population that are food insecure. Part of our role in this collaborative effort is to convene individuals and groups who can pool creative ideas, expertise and resources so that we can make a difference, together.

FFAR’s Board of Directors identified six thematic areas for FFAR to focus its research funding. These Challenge Areas address large-scale agricultural issues, while acknowledging broad implications and impacts. It is only through working together and an interdisciplinary approach that we can sustainably feed a growing global population. FFAR’s Challenge Areas include:
• Soil Health
• Sustainable Water Management
• Next Generation Crops
• Advanced Animal Systems
• Urban Food Systems
• Health-Agriculture Nexus

FFAR engages stakeholders across academia, public sector and private companies to identify pressing research ideas with potential to fill critical knowledge gaps and advance science. While an independent nonprofit, the Foundation complements and advances the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) mission and builds programs that are of mutual interest to USDA and the agricultural community at-large. We fund only the most innovative, actionable science with the potential for positive impact in the United States and around the world.

FFAR supports the best and brightest scientists to uncover innovative and transformative discoveries to feed the world. We were created to be a flexible organization, able to meet research challenges in unique ways. FFAR awards funding through four mechanisms:

• Requests for Applications (RFAs): FFAR issues a Request for Application (RFA) to solicit ideas from the broadest group of researchers. Some of FFAR’s programs issue RFAs annually and others are a one-time opportunity. The highest quality proposals in terms of technical merit and impact are selected for funding through a rigorous scientific review process.

• Direct Funds: When FFAR knows of a specific individual or organization that is well- suited to conduct the necessary research, a research proposal may be directly solicited from that organization. The proposal is subject to the same rigorous scientific review process and matching funding requirement as other proposals.

• Consortia: Food and agriculture research can be financially risky. FFAR establishes precompetitive consortia to address common problems recognized across the industry, where solutions are beneficial to all. Consortia participants jointly determine research priorities, pool resources and knowledge, and share research results, which also become public.

• Prizes: FFAR offers prize competitions to inspire excellence in food and agriculture science or to solve an imminent problem. Prizes are awarded to individuals or organizations who meet the prize criteria and solve the food and agriculture challenge.

FFAR’s unique model unites scientists, industry leaders, trade associations, and global philanthropies from across the food and agriculture industries to bring solutions to scale. FFAR has awarded over 130 grants and worked with nearly 400 partners to date. For example, Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency (RIPE) is a research partnership that improves photosynthesis to equip farmers worldwide with higher-yielding crops to ensure populations thrive. RIPE and its partners, FFAR, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the U.K. Government’s Department for International Development, are committed to making these technologies available to farmers who need them most. The research team has already achieved a ground-breaking scientific breakthrough by increasing crop yield by almost 50% and plant water efficiency by over 25%. RIPE demonstrates the power of partnership and scientific innovation to improve farmer productivity and reduce hunger.

FFAR will continue to work with academic, industry, government and nonprofit partners to support research that addresses pressing food and agriculture issues where increased investment can propel science into application.

Financials

Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research

Board of directors
as of 8/31/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Mark Keenum

Mississippi State University

Kathryn Boor

Cornell University

Doug Buhler

Michigan State University

Doug Cameron

First Green Partners and Alberti Advisors

Nancy Creamer

North Carolina State University

Deborah Delmer

University of California, Davis

Beth Ford

Land O’Lakes, Inc.

Hon. Dan Glickman

Aspen Institute

Rob Horsch

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Retired)

Mark Keenum

Mississippi State University

Michael Ladisch

Purdue University

John Lumpkin

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina Foundation

Chris Mallett

Cargill, Inc. (Retired)

Pamela Marrone

Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc.

Terry McElwain

Washington State University

Stanley Prusiner

University of California, San Francisco

Danita Rodibaugh

Rodibaugh & Sons

Bob Stallman

American Farm Bureau Federation

Alton Thompson

Association of Research Directors of 1890 Land Grant Universities

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable