COASTAL ROOTS FARM

Nourishing Community

Encinitas, CA   |  www.coastalrootsfarm.org

Mission

Coastal Roots Farm’s mission is to cultivate healthy, connected communities by integrating sustainable agriculture, food justice, and ancient wisdom. We envision a world in which every community comes together to grow and share healthy food, care for the land, help their neighbors, and strengthen the connections they have with each other. The Farm is a nonprofit community farm and education center where we practice organic farming, share our harvest with those who lack access, deliver unique farm-based educational programs, and foster inclusive spaces for people of all backgrounds to come together to connect, learn, and celebrate in ways that catalyze a healthier, more vibrant community and a more sustainable environmental future for our region.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Mr. Javier Guerrero

Main address

441 Saxony Rd

Encinitas, CA 92024 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-1570910

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

Jewish (X30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food insecurity has risen to unprecedented levels due to COVID-19, impacting 1 in 3households in San Digeo County over the last year. Suffering has been greatest among BIPOC communities, single-parent families, veterans and military families, migrant workers, and senior citizens. Additionally, getting youth outdoors matters, but nature-based educational opportunities are not equally available for youth from low-income communities and students from underserved areas. COVID-19 has exacerbated inequities and school closures are leading to learning loss, regression in academic achievements, and lost opportunities for social-emotional development in youth. Further, there are few organizations in San Diego that are able to provide equitable environmental learning opportunities that meet California Common Core standards in an outdoor farm setting. Finally, our diverse community is seeking accessible space to come together celebrate, learn, and engage with the land, food, and one another.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Equity: Organic Food Distribution

Through our Organic Food Distribution Program, the Farm grows approximately 50,000 pounds of certified-organic, nutrient-dense fruits, vegetables, herbs, and eggs annually to feed the most vulnerable and food-insecure members of its community. The Farm’s Organic Food Distribution Program fosters a healthy environment and serves as an access point for healthy food for underserved communities. This program is designed to address and reduce food insecurity and ensure low-income, at-risk communities have equal and dignified access to locally grown, fresh, organic food, regardless of ability to pay. All food for the Organic Food Distribution Program is grown on-site at Coastal Roots Farm and is distributed directly to recipients at this location and throughout San Diego County via mobile distributions implemented in collaboration with strategic community partners.

Priority populations served through the Organic Food Distribution Program include:
• Elderly, low-income, and homebound Indigenous/Native families
• Elderly, low-income, and homebound survivors of the Holocaust
• Veterans and low-level enlisted military members and their families
• Low-income Hispanic/Latinx families, immigrants, and refugees
• Low-income individuals, seniors, and families, especially mothers with young children

Fresh, nutrient-dense, organic food is distributed four to five days a week onsite at the Farm and offsite in the community via close community partnerships and collaborations meant to maximize impact, de-duplicate efforts, and reach diverse food-insecure populations where they are located.

The Farm’s Organic Food Distribution Program includes:
• A “Pay-What-You-Can” Farm Stand located at the Farm (accepts CalFresh EBT, offers up to $30 worth of produce at no-cost, and provides a private, dignified check-out process), collaborating with Los Angelitos de Encinitas, North County Immigration and Citizenship Center, and Casa De Amistad to reach low-income Latinx families.
• No-cost home deliveries to homebound Native American seniors living throughout San Diego County in partnership with the San Diego American Indian Health Center who offers medical, dental, behavioral health, and community wellness services.
• No-cost home deliveries to elderly, homebound Native American families of the Iipay Nation living at the Santa Ysabel Reservation.
• No-cost home deliveries to survivors of the Holocaust, many of whom are homebound and living in poverty and in partnership with Jewish Family Services who provides wrap-around geriatric care services.
• No-cost mobile Farm Stand at Vista Community Clinic, a comprehensive healthcare clinic serving predominately low-income, immigrant, and uninsured families; in collaboration with Feeding San Diego who offers beneficiaries non-perishable foods.
• No-cost mobile Farm Stand for military families and veterans in partnership with Helping Hand Worldwide who provide beneficiaries non-perishables, meats, dairy, diapers, clothes, and more.
• Donations to Mercy Housing’s Cantebria Senior Homes; a low-income housing unit for seniors.
• Donations to other local social service agencies and emergency food system partners, including Community Resource Center, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church’s Food Bank, Jewish Family Services’ Corner Market, Kitchens for Good, Produce Good, USO, Wounded Warrior Homes, and more.

Since inception in 2014, the Farm has distributed over 250,000 pounds of food, nearly 70% of which has been donated at no-cost to nearly 150,000 individuals.

The Food Distribution program goes beyond meeting basic needs and reducing food insecurity through calories alone. We offer high-quality nutrition in accessible ways and provide recipients with the one-on-one education and resources (provided in both English and Spanish) needed to understand what they are eating, how to prepare it, how to store it, and why food plays a critical role in their health and in their lives. Further, beneficiaries have direct access to the Farm to learn about where their food comes from and why this matters. This leads to a shift in how community members, individually and collectively, care for the land and each other, improving health and well-being, creating a more robust food system, and nurturing a stronger, more connected community.

COVID-19 Update: The Farm's Organic Food Distribution Program has continued to operate uninterrupted since the COVID-19 outbreak and is more critical than ever as vulnerable community members struggling with food insecurity have been and continue to be disproportionally impacted. We remain 100% committed to our mission to ensure the most at-risk, vulnerable members of our community have equitable and dignified access to fresh, healthy food.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Ethnic and racial groups
Military personnel
Seniors

Coastal Roots Farm utilizes its 17-acre outdoor “classroom” as a unique platform to provide the community with a welcoming space to gain a deeper understanding of the food system, the importance of environmental stewardship, and how individual actions can impact one’s health, the environment, and the community. This includes offering weekly Open Volunteer Hours and Farm Tours, engaging in local, state, regional, and national conferences, hosting community events and festivals to highlight and celebrate agricultural traditions, and providing high quality youth programming, including After-School and Seasonal Farm Camps and Environmental STEM & Nutrition Education programs for K-12 students. The Farm’s educational programs utilize our Education Farm and Gardens, 8-acre Food Forest, indoor-outdoor Farm STEM Science Lab, Mobile Teaching, Kitchen, and a Nature Play and Environmental Learning Space to motivate deeper understating of agriculture and food systems and to inspire future generations of environmental leaders.

The Farm’s Youth Education Programs, School and Group Visits and After-School and Seasonal Farm Camps, deliver a continuum of comprehensive, hands-on, farm/environmental education programs for Pre-K through 12th grade students and provide youth with unique opportunities to gain deep, real-world understanding of important scientific topics through nature-based learning. Programs meet Common Core, STEM science, and New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and include comprehensive lesson plans and engaging, hands-on experiences on the Farm. The Farm’s high-quality educational experiences encourage creativity, critical thinking, and self-sufficiency, and teach youth important scientific concepts in ways they can touch, feel and taste. Activities require problem-solving, critical thinking, teamwork and creativity, and connect youth with the origins of their food in a way they would not otherwise be able to experience on a working production farm.

Getting youth outdoors matters, but nature-based educational opportunities are not equally available for youth from low-income communities. All Farm educational programs are available on a pay-what-you-can model to ensure equitable access to high-quality, environmental education. The Farm offers Farm Camp scholarships as well as School and Group Visit scholarships and bus transportation for students from low-income, Title-I, and Title-V schools so that no school, group, child, or family is turned away due to inability to pay. Since inception, the Farm has welcomed nearly 7,000 youth to the Farm, more than 4,000 of which have come on scholarship.

COVID-19 Update: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Farm has continued to offer educational programing via virtual platforms and safely implemented a modified onsite Summer Farm Camp that welcomed campers to the Farm for week-long sessions throughout July and August. The Farm’s new After School Farm Camp provides parents struggling with the challenges of COVID-19 with accessible childcare solutions and immersive outdoor experiences for kids. Scholarships are available for any family in need.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults
At-risk youth
Farmers

Coastal Roots Farm nourishes its community while sustainably caring for the land it so deeply relies on. The Farm manages 17 acres of certified-organic farmland, consisting of 2.5 acres of vegetable production fields, Education Farm & Gardens, a large-scale Compost Operation, three chicken flocks, and an 8-acre agroforestry “Food Forest.” The Farm’s Food Forest is a strategic, symbiotic ecosystem of orchard trees, shrubs, vegetable crops, herbs, and foraging chickens that yields large harvests while supporting natural ecosystems and wildlife habitats (for example, more than 87 species of birds, including rare and endangered, have been observed in the Food Forest). The Farm’s regenerative agricultural practices build and restore top soils and enrich soil fertility, improve watersheds and conserve water, increase biodiversity, and sequester carbon from the atmosphere. These carbon-farming methods result in a myriad of co-benefits ranging from more fertile soil, more nutrient-dense foods, and overall climate resilience.

The Farm utilizes several agroforestry practices, including:
• Food Forestry: A strategic, symbiotic ecosystem of orchard trees, shrubs, vegetable crops, and herbs.
• Silvopasture: Integrated livestock pastures where, in the case of the Farm, chickens forage and rotationally graze between tree rows.
• Poultry: Chickens forage pests, help fertilize and improve soil health and biodiversity, combat erosion, and produce protein-rich eggs for distribution. Chicken manure also naturally integrates nitrogen into the soil, adding necessary nutrients.
• Alley cropping: After the chickens move through each pasture, the enriched soil is planted with crops to maximize Farm space and increase production yields.
• Swales and berms: A system of ditches built into the land’s contours slowing the flow of rainwater runoff, storing ground water for the trees and vegetable crops to access, and combating soil erosion.
• Wildlife corridors and habitats: Natural ecosystems are encouraged. Over 76 species of birds, including rare and endangered species, have been spotted in our Food Forest.

In addition, the Farm creates its own nutrient-dense soil through an extensive composting and waste diversion program. Since inception in 2014, the Farm has diverted over four million pounds of organic and green waste from the landfill, offsetting thousands of metric tons of CO2 emissions, creating biodiverse soil, and producing vitamin-rich food for its community.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Farmers
Children and youth

Coastal Roots Farm was founded on ancient Jewish traditions that connect people to community, food, the land, and social justice. Ancient practices and values such as honoring the natural cycles of the earth, letting the land rest, sharing one’s harvest with those in need, and ethical consumption all inform how we grow and share food, care for plants and animals, and connect with our neighbors. While the Farm is a completely secular (i.e., not a religious) organization, we recognize how these values may be applied universally to benefit the land and community. Our programs have been built to be accessible, inclusive and to reach beneficiaries from all walks of life, and our diverse team is committed to a culture that welcomes people of all backgrounds, regardless of religious identity.

Responding to the needs of a dramatically increasing population of Jews in North San Diego County, in addition to a growing number of interfaith families and diverse communities, we seek to create and foster diverse and inclusive access points for North County families and people throughout the region to explore and engage with Jewish life and identity, sustainable agriculture, and food justice. We believe that through creating inclusive spaces that are open to people of all backgrounds and faiths, we can help catalyze a healthier, more vibrate and compassionate community as well as a radically welcoming place to celebrate Jewish life.

We are a living Jewish community farm that uses farming, gardening, and food as a way to teach about Jewish tradition and heritage, build Jewish identity and community, and make the world a more just and sustainable place. We seek to make practices that are thousands of years old relevant lessons for today. These practices inform how we grow produce, share belongings, treat neighbors, observe the passing of time, celebrate and improve, care for plants and animals, and create a vibrant, welcoming community.

The Farm offers seasonal Festivals based on Jewish agricultural holidays (Sukkot, Tu B’shvat, and Shavout), as well as many other public events that engage more than 5,000 community members annually and provide unique opportunities for people of all backgrounds to experience the intersection between sustainable agriculture, food justice, and Jewish tradition and culture. It is through these types of events that we are able to create vibrant, meaningful, and nourishing experiences for our community - experiences that reach across barriers of identity, culture, religion, and more, and connect our diverse neighbors back to one another, the land, and their food.

COVID-19 Update: Currently our community programs and Jewish Agricultural Festivals have moved to virtual platforms and/or drive-through formats in order to maintain safe social distancing. We look forward to welcoming our community back to the Farm for fun, educational, and engaging on-site events once conditions allow.

Population(s) Served
Jewish people
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hectares of land that are (or are in the process of being) organically certified as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Farmers, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Regenerative and Organic Farming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Results reported in acres. Coastal Roots Farm received its organic certification from CCOF (California Certified Organic Farmers) in June 2017; it has used organic practices since its founding.

Total pounds of target crop harvested

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Ethnic and racial groups, Military personnel, Immigrants and migrants, Seniors

Related Program

Food Equity: Organic Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since inception, the Farm has grown, using sustainable and regenerative agricultural methods, nearly 250,000 pounds of food, the majority of which has been donated at no cost to the food insecure.

Area of land, in hectares, indirectly controlled by the organization and under sustainable cultivation or sustainable stewardship

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Farmers, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Regenerative and Organic Farming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Results reported in acres. The Farm grows on approximately 17 acres of land and includes vegetable production, chickens, compost operations, and a food forest.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Farmers, Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth

Related Program

Equitable Environmental Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Farm’s educational programs reach over 5,000 community members on avg annually. Programs include Tours, School & Group Visits, Camps, Volunteering, Jewish agricultural festivals, and other events.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, At-risk youth, Farmers, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Equitable Environmental Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Events include Jewish agricultural festivals, a Shabbat summer series, Farm Tours, open volunteer opportunities, School and Group Visits, Farm Camp, etc.

Area of land, in hectares, directly controlled by the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Farmers, Economically disadvantaged people, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Regenerative and Organic Farming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Results reported in acres.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Military personnel, Immigrants and migrants, Ethnic and racial groups, Seniors

Related Program

Food Equity: Organic Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since 2014, the Farm has reached over 180,000 individuals, including low-income families and seniors, immigrants and refugees, military and veterans, homeless, and other food insecure individuals.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Farmers, At-risk youth

Related Program

Equitable Environmental Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since inception, over 4,400 community volunteers have contributed to the Farm’s programs, including ongoing Farm maintenance, and events. NOTE: Decrease in 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Acres of Food Forest modeling regenerative agriculture

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Regenerative and Organic Farming

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Agroforestry increases farm yields, conserves soil and water, limits the use of pesticides, increases wildlife habitat and ecosystems, and sequesters carbon to fight global warming.

Pounds of green waste diverted from the landfill

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Regenerative and Organic Farming

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Since inception in 2014, the Farm has diverted nearly 4.3 million pounds of green waste from the landfill

Pounds of fresh produce distributed per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Military personnel, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Food Equity: Organic Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each year, the Farm distributes approximately 50,000 pounds of fresh, organic produce. The majority of this is donated at no-cost to low-income, food insecure individuals.

Pounds of fresh produce donated per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Seniors, Immigrants and migrants, Military personnel, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Food Equity: Organic Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each year, the Farm distributes the majority of its harvests of fresh, organic, nutrient-dense produce at no-cost to low-income, food insecure individuals.

Number of students educated through field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Equitable Environmental Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Farm offers School & Group Visits based on Common Core, STEM-aligned curriculum for students in pre-K through 8th grade. The Farm offers scholarships to low-income, Title I and V schools.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Equitable Environmental Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Farm is committed to reducing barriers to outdoors, farm-based education and provides field trip and bus transportation scholarships for low-income, Title I and Title V schools.

Number of carbon emissions prevented (estimated by CO2 equivalent)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Regenerative and Organic Farming

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Farm diverts, on average, 27 tons of green waste from the landfill per month, or an average of 391 metric tons of of avoided CO2E emissions per year.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Farm strives to improve community health and connections by:
• Utilizing the Farm as a unique platform for diverse and inclusive farm-based environmental education to improve community health and increase awareness, involvement, and passion for nature, food, and environmental stewardship.
• Reducing food insecurity in San Diego County by ensuring residents have equal access to fresh, organic, nutrient-dense, culturally appropriate foods, regardless of ability to pay.
• Serving as a model for sustainable, regenerative farming and local food systems building and engaging in meaningful collaborative, food justice efforts.
• Catalyzing a healthier, more vibrant, and welcoming community by creating inclusive access points for people of all backgrounds and faiths to come together to connect, learn, celebrate, explore, and engage with the land, food, and one another.

Coastal Roots Farm nourishes its community while sustainably caring for the land it so deeply relies on. The Farm manages 17 acres of certified-organic farmland, consisting of 2.5 acres of vegetable production fields, Education Farm & Gardens, a large-scale Compost Operation, three chicken flocks, and an 8-acre agroforestry “Food Forest.” The Farm’s Food Forest is a strategic, symbiotic ecosystem of orchard trees, shrubs, vegetable crops, herbs, and foraging chickens that yields large harvests while supporting natural ecosystems and wildlife habitats (for example, more than 80 species of birds, including rare and endangered, have been observed in the Food Forest). The Farm’s regenerative agricultural practices build and restore top soils and enrich soil fertility, improve watersheds and conserve water, increase biodiversity, and sequester carbon from the atmosphere. These carbon-farming methods result in a myriad of co-benefits ranging from more fertile soil, more nutrient-dense foods, and overall climate resilience.

Coastal Roots Farm is uniquely positioned to address food insecurity in North San Diego County and play a vital role in the community. The Farm grows its own certified-organic, nutrient-dense food, harvests produce immediately for distribution to ensure the freshest food possible reaches its beneficiaries, utilizes a refrigerated Farm truck to bring freshly harvested produce directly to low-income, food insecure-communities, provides recipients with detailed nutritional information and healthy recipes, and collaborates with strategic community partners to maximize the breadth and impact of its services. While Coastal Roots Farm primarily operates in North San Diego County, it has built strategic and extensive partnerships to reach priority populations throughout San Diego County.

Coastal Roots Farm provides a unique, outdoor learning environment four our community to connect to the land, their food, and one another. The Farm’s educational programs utilize our Education Farm and Garden, 8-acre Food Forest, indoor-outdoor Farm STEM Science Lab, and a soon to be constructed Nature Play and Environmental Learning Space to motivate deeper understating of agriculture, food systems, and food justice to inspire future generations of environmental leaders. Additionally, by creating inclusive spaces open to people of all backgrounds and faiths, we believe we can catalyze a healthier, more vibrate community as well as a more welcoming place to celebrate Jewish life.

Coastal Roots Farm's dedicated staff, volunteers, and community partners drive the Farm's success. Partnerships also play an important role in ensuring the Farm achieves its agricultural, educational, community engagement, and food-production and food-distribution goals. Our community partners include Vista Community Clinic, San Diego American Indian Health Center, the Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, Camp Pendleton, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Community Resource Center, Kitchens for Good, Helping Hand Worldwide, Mercy Housing's Cantebria Senior Home, Los Angelitos de Encinitas, North County Immigration and Citizenship Center, Casa De Amistad, Jewish Family Service, Wounded Warrior Homes, USO, and more. Our School partners include the Escondido Union School District, Encinitas United School District, Cardiff Elementary School, Soille Hebrew Day School, San Diego Jewish Academy, Fallbrook STEM Academy, Waldorf San Diego, Ashley Fall Elementary School, Museum School, Sanderling Waldorf School, Kavod Charter School, and more. The Farm property also borders the Encinitas School District's Farm Lab, Magdalena Ecke Family YMCA, San Diego Botanic Garden, San Dieguito Heritage Museum, and the Seacrest Village Retirement Community, allowing for tailored programming and cross-collaboration opportunities. San Diego's semi-arid Mediterranean climate enables produce and programming to be provided year-round, maximizing output and educational impact. The property is also home to a hub of 35 Jewish and secular organizations, their diverse work adding to the richness of Farm activities.

All Farm programs are meant to benefit the surrounding community, from making sure low-income families have access to fresh food to investing in a healthy environmental future for the region. Progress has been significant. Since inception in 2014, the Farm has:
• Grown and distributed more than 250,000 pounds of fresh, nutrient-dense, organic produce and over 63,000 eggs;
• Donated nearly 150,000 pounds of fresh, organic produce at no cost to the community;
• Reached more that 180,000 individuals through the Organic Food Distribution program;
• Diverted 4.7 million pounds of waste from the landfill, positively offsetting atmospheric CO2 by approximately 2,500 metric tons of avoided CO2E emissions (the equivalent of more than 6,250 cars taken off of the road);
• Engaged more than 30,000 individuals through all educational programming and events, volunteering, and events;
• Engaged more than 6,514 individuals through Jewish agricultural festivals and events;
• Engaged more than 7,000 students and youth School and Group Visits;
• Provided scholarships to more than 5,000 students to come to the Farm for Farm Visits;
• Engaged more than 300 youth through Farm Camps;
• Reinforced class learning objectives during School & Group Visit (100% of teachers reporting a 4 or higher on a 1-5 scale);
• Helped foster class interest in nature and the environment (100% of teachers reporting a 4 or higher on a 1-5 scale);
• Helped foster class interest in food and food systems (97% of teachers reporting a 4 or higher on a 1-5 scale);
• Offered nearly 800 volunteer opportunities and engaged more than 6,000 volunteers;
• In 2017, the Farm received its organic certification from the California Certified Organic Farmers. However, the Farm has used organic practices from the start.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Target populations served through our mission include: Indigenous/Native families, Hispanic/Latinx families, immigrants and refugees, Holocaust survivors, veterans, low-level enlisted military members and their families, and other low-income individuals, seniors, and families with young children, at-risk youth and underserved youth, Jewish community members, and the community overall. The Farm’s Director of Grants, Impact, and Evaluation oversees program data collected through participant attendance tracking and surveys and interviews with community leaders, participants, partners, and staff, and strives to evaluate its programs to understand how the Farm is addressing systems that have historically oppressed BIPOC and other at-risk communities and meeting the needs of the community.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, Impact and evaluation, benchmarkers, program success, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In May of 2020, the Farm was honored and privileged to begin new partnerships with the Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel and San Diego American Indian Health Center to deliver no-cost fresh, organic produce to senior Native families living throughout San Diego County in partnership with San Diego American Indian Health Center as well as senior Native families of the Iipay Nation, Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians, and the Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeño Indians. he Farm conducted surveying three months into the new program to better understand if we were meeting community need. The positive impacts of the program were shown via direct testimonials, letters of appreciation, and surveys. With this feedback, the Farm committed to continuing to implement the program.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

COASTAL ROOTS FARM
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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COASTAL ROOTS FARM

Board of directors
as of 3/31/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Charlene Seidle

Leichtag Foundation

Term: 2016 - 2019

Adam Bernam

Urban Adamah

James Farley

Leichtag Foundation

Leilani Rasmussen

Leichtag Foundation

Sharyn Goodson

Leichtag Foundation

Javier Guerrero

Coastal Roots Farm

Charlene Seidle

Leichtag Foundation

Todd Frank

Frank Financial Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/02/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/13/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.