Animal related

Friends of Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge

aka Friends of Hawaiian Islands NWR or FoHI   |   Honolulu, HI   |  https://www.friendsofhawaiianislands.org/

Mission

Connecting you with the nature and culture of the NWHI through education and outreach in support of Hawaiian Islands NWR, part of Papahanaumokuakea.

Ruling year info

2015

Chair, Board of Directors

Ms. Nicole Galase

Main address

PO Box 235253

Honolulu, HI 96822 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

47-1778045

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Hawaiian Islands NWR is not open to visitors and the Refuge needs assistance in making its existence and purpose known. Due to their remoteness, many Pacific Island Refuges have relied on national interest in our lands for their protection and conservation. However, as budgetary constraints increase on the National Wildlife Refuge System, Refuges will need to seek local community support for important programs and projects. Community engagement plays an important role in the success of each Friends group to support the mission of the US Fish and Wildlife Service to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. Volunteer-based Friends groups are a valuable conduit of information between the Refuges and the public on current issues, for soliciting help for specific projects, and for fund raising particularly as national budgetary pressures highlight the importance of finding local community sources.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Curriculum for Keiki

We will connect the public with the nature and culture of the NWHI by creating curriculum that incorporates the Refuge.

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)

We will connect the public with the nature and culture of the NWHI by sharing stories that compel the public to take action. We will inform the public of the issues that concern the NWHI, and provide direct ways to advocate for the protection of its resources.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meetings held with decision makers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Public Action

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FoHI Board Members continue to meet on a regular basis with US Fish and Wildlife Refuge Managers to keep up-to-date with Refuge conservation management programs.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Public Action

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of Facebook followers to the Friends of Hawaiian Islands NWR's Facebook page has significantly increased over the last 3 years due to improved social media outreach.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Received Friends of National Wildlife Refuges Nonprofit Capacity Building 2-Year Grant in 2016

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FOHI Board Members continue to to improve our board governance skills and establish regional Refuge partners by attending Friends group conferences in D.C., Hawai'i and Alaska.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As we have increased the number of board members over the years, we have increased the number of volunteer hours those board members have contributed to FOHI.

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people influenced to undertake conservation action

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Related Program

Public Action

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2019, FoHI hosted educational booth events at several conferences in Hawai;i that were attended by close to 500 people who picked up stickers, postcards and informational materials about the Refuge

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

1. Educate the children in Hawaii about the nature and culture of the Refuge so they will grow up to support and protect them. Although the Refuge comes from the same hotspot as our main Hawaiian Islands, many children in Hawaii grow up without hearing about these remote atolls. It is important that children in Hawaii are knowledgeable of the nature and culture of the NWHI. With this knowledge and responsibility, they will hopefully become active participants in preserving the nature and culture of these islands. 2. Build a cohort of vocal supporters for the Refuge through dynamic outreach that will create an awareness and passion for nature and culture of the islands. It is increasingly vital for people to be educated and unified in supporting the protection of our environmental and cultural resources. We will work to create educated advocates for the Refuge by informing citizens of the steps they can take when issues arise, as well as keeping the public abreast of pertinent issues.

1. There is a great opportunity to use the Hawaiian Islands NWR as a base to develop curriculum for primary education. We will achieve our goal by creating curriculum that educators can use as a supplement to their own lessons. Teachers will request curriculum classroom visits from FoHI volunteer educators. Lesson plans will satisfy common core standards, while also exposing students to the Hawaiian Islands NWR. This will provide another layer of hands-on-learning and give supporters of FoHI a chance to get involved in the community. 2. We plan to develop content that shares evidence-based knowledge with the public and to facilitate discussion as well as action from the public. We will make advocacy an approachable task for citizens of all educational backgrounds.

The idea to form the Friends of HINWR began in 2012 when wildlife volunteers noticed the need for community outreach to raise awareness about the Refuge, its unique significance and the need for its preservation. The stronger and more effective the Friends group becomes, the greater the benefit to the Refuge such as additional funds and public awareness to support federal conservation efforts, benefiting the entire ecosystem within the Northwest Hawaiian Islands as well as across our neighboring Pacific Refuges that are so intricately linked through shared ocean currents, migratory patterns, and related species. With a young and enthusiastic Board of Directors, FoHI has secured grants and in-kind donations to help work with other Pacific refuges to increase public awareness of the importance of their interconnectedness throughout the region, as well as build partnerships among ecological and cultural stakeholders throughout the Papahānaumokuā Marine National Monument.

1. For our education goals, we will measure success by the number of teachers that request and use our curriculum in their classroom, as well as by the number of classroom visits made annually by Friends of HINWR volunteer educators. Establishing successful long term partnerships with schools, museums and educational institutions will be another benchmark for our organization to measure its progress in the number of people we reaches with our education and outreach program. 2. For our Public Advocacy goals, we will measure success by the number of Members that join and donate to the Friends of HINWR, as well as the number of participants in future awareness campaigns. We are designing promotional items such as stickers, postcards and informational materials to hand out at local events and plan to partner with US Fish and Wildlife Service and Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument volunteer booths at local outreach events to spread awareness of Refuge issues to a broader audience. The number of events attended by Friends of HINWR volunteers and the amount of promotional items handed out with be another benchmark for success.

January 2018 – Several FOHI Board Members attended the Māhuahua pū Conference in Kauai, Hawai’i, hosted by USFWS and NWRA to discuss challenges shared by Hawaiian and Alaskan Refuge Friends groups and to develop partnerships within the Northeast Pacific region June 2018 – Several FOHI Board Members participated in a panel discussion at the premier of “Albatross the Film” at the Honolulu Academy, to celebrate this documentary and education the public on the environmental impact marine debris is having on the albatross population at Midway Atoll July 2018 – Several FOHI Board Members attended the Hawai‘i Conservation Conference on Honolulu, Hawai’i. September 2018 – FOHI Board Member joined a research team of anthropologists and archeologists traveling to the island of Nihoa, within the NWHI, to study the ceremonial structures and burial sites, left behind by Hawaiians centuries ago. November 2018 – FOHI Board Member attended the Symposium on Science in Support of Archipelagic Management, hosted by USWFS, in Honolulu, Hawai’i. December 2018 – FOHI received a peer-to-peer grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) to attend the next annual Pacific Region Friends Group Conference in Homer, Alaska in September 2019 December 2018 – FOHI began distributing its newly created swag items (made possible through the NFWF capacity building grant) to its donors and volunteers for their continued support January 2019 – FOHI completed its final report for the NFWF capacity building grant and is close to launching its organizational website and along with a short promotional video introducing the NWHI and the Friends of HINWR to the general public February 2019 - FOHI Board Member attended the Pacific Seabird Group Annual Meeting in Kaua‘i, Hawai’I, at which she hosted a booth to hand out FoHI swag and educate booth visitors about the NW Hawaiian Islands. April 2019 - FOHI Board Members hosted informational outreach booths at the Waikiki Aquarium Earth Day event in Honolulu, HI and the UH Hilo Earth Day celebration in Hilo, HI July 2019 - FOHI Board Members and USFWS Honolulu Liaison hosted an informational outreach booth at the Hawaii Conservation Conference in Honolulu, HI July 2019 – FOHI and FOMA Board Members met to discuss the development of a regional Friends partnership September 2019 – FOHI Board Members attended the USFWS Peer-to-Peer Workshop in Homer, Alaska to discuss challenges shared by Hawaiian, Northwest Pacific and Alaskan Refuge Friends groups to share ideas and to develop partnerships within Regions 1 and 7.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: suggestion box/email.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: our board.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback.

Financials

Friends of Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Friends of Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge

Board of directors
as of 1/17/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Nicole Galase

Catherine Fox

Heather Smith

Asher Loring

Ilana Nimz

Stephanie Levins

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/17/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/17/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.

Keywords

Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge Friends Group