Novick Cardiac Alliance

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aka Novick Cardiac Alliance   |   Memphis, TN   |  http://www.cardiac-alliance.org

Mission

To provide pediatric cardiac care to children in underserved regions of low and middle-income countries and education to their healthcare professionals in order to achieve an independently functioning local team over time. Our goal is to build local capacity and sustainability in pediatric cardiac care in low and middle-income countries. We do this regardless of gender, race, religion, economics or political affiliations.

Ruling year info

2015

CEO

Dr. William M Novick

Main address

1750 Madison Ave Ste 500

Memphis, TN 38104 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-2184002

NTEE code info

Health Support Services (E60)

Heart and Circulatory System (G43)

Heart and Circulatory (H43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

William Novick Global Cardiac Alliance was created to help provide the total cardiac care to children in developing countries. Each year 1.3 million children are born with a heart defect. 14% of children born with a heart defect will not survive their first month of life and 30% will not survive their first year of life without treatment. (Reference from our webpage) The children we serve have limited access to quality cardiac care, and the families lack the financial resources to seek care elsewhere.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Pediatric Cardiac Care

The Novick Cardiac Alliance is committed to bringing sustainable health care solutions to children with cardiac disease in the developing world.
We are dedicated to improving the skills, knowledge, technology and experience of local health-care providers in regions of the world without access to quality Pediatric Cardiac Care.
We aim to provide comprehensive care to all children with congenital or acquired heart disease regardless of gender, ethnicity, religion, political ideation, genetic factors or economic means.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free open heart surgeries performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The COVID pandemic significantly reduced our ability to travel to our sites of assistance. The number of children and families served dropped in both 2020 and 2021. We hope 2022 will allow normal.

Number of families served in heart-related treatment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Pediatric Cardiac Care

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who underwent open heart surgery

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are the total number of children that received operations during our teams time on our affiliate sites.

Number of children evaluated on each trip.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are the children that undergo echo-cardiogram, chest x-ray and consultation with the pediatric cardiologists and surgeons for consideration for medical treatment or surgery during a trip.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is that in the future all children with heart disease, no matter where they are born, will be able to receive the medical and surgical care they require to live a long and healthy life.

We collaborate with local hospitals, governments, humanitarian organizations, and Health Ministries to provide total cardiac care to children in developing countries. This collaboration will enable local health-care authorities to build Pediatric Cardiac care services in-country and in time eliminate the need to send these children abroad for surgery.
We educate local health-care professionals and work with their educational institutions to improve the standard of training and hence care provided to children with heart disease. Education includes clinical bedside teaching, didactic lectures, and ad hoc teaching sessions on site.

We have both permanent and volunteer staff to carry out our pediatric cardiac care health initiatives. Such a setting allows us to have teams in the field simultaneously providing clinical services to the children and education to the local healthcare professionals. Fundraising is the key to being able to provide more service in Low and Middle-Income countries. Therefore we seek funding sources at every level, private individuals, civic organizations, foundations both private and public as well as corporate support and support from the countries' own Ministry of Health or Finance.

We have the ability to expand our services so that we are making 40-50 trips annually operating on more than 800 children and teaching multiple teams locally simultaneously.

Since our humble beginning in November 2014 we have operated on over 2,500 children with heart disease in the following countries; China (Beijing), Ecuador (Guayaquil), Honduras (Tegucigalpa), Iran (Tehran, Zahedan), Iraq (Najaf, Karbala, Babylon, Basra), Kyrgyzstan (Biskek), Lebanon (Al Rachaya), Libya (Benghazi, Tobruk, Tripoli), Macedonia (Skopje), Morocco (Rabat), Nigeria (Enugu, Oyo), Democratic Republic of Congo (Lubumbashi), Pakistan (Rawalpindi), Russia (Kemerovo, Nizhny Novgorod, Voronezh) and Ukraine (Kharkiv, Kyiv, and L'viv) a total of 14 countries and 26 cities.

Each city receives training and education of the local healthcare professionals and if the cities are not too far apart doctors and technicians from other cities visit us for additional training in pediatric cardiac care. We have developed sustainable programs in Beijing, Guayaquil, Tegucigalpa, Tehran, Karbala, Skopje, Rabat, Rawalpindi, Kemerovo, Nizhny Novgorod, Voronezh, Kharkiv, Kyiv, and L'viv which are all independently capable of providing substantial pediatric cardiac care.

Several sites still require multiple trips per year for additional time before they will be independently caring for these children and able to establish sustainable programs. We are committed to continuing to visit these sites to help the children and build the capacity of the local team.

We have a number of programs in the developmental stages; Quito (Ecuador), and Imphal (India) where we are simply waiting for COVID-19 quarantine issues to be resolved. Similarly, we have a program ready to launch in Lubumbashi (DRC) waiting on COVID-19 border closure and quarantine to be lifted. We are working with a hospital in Bulawayo (Zimbabwe) to get infrastructure upgrades sponsored and performed so that it reaches the level needed to carry our pediatric cardiac care. We are also implementing an ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, heart support device for heart failure) course in Kharkiv which will begin when COVID-19 restrictions in Ukraine are relaxed.

Projects on the horizon are improving pediatric cardiac surgical services in Ibn Al Bitar Cardiac Center in Baghdad and instituting a pediatric cardiac surgical service in Luanda, Angola. Our future efforts on the African continent include helping improve programs in Angola and Rwanda in the near future.

The magnitude of the deficit for pediatric cardiac care in Low and Middle-Income countries (LMIC) demands that we continue to train as many individuals in LMIC as we can.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The local pediatric cardiac surgical teams we train. The families that benefit from the surgery we provide. Sponsors and donors.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Direct communications with families via email, FaceBook and text messages,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Recently we organized a campaign to raise funds to purchase medicines for the children in southern Zimbabwe, this is a deviation from our usual program of providing surgery. We were unable to get to Zimbabwe to provide direct care, so we saw this departure as an option to provide indirect care. The request came from the Zimbabwean charity "Brave Little Hearts Zimbabwe".

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback from our beneficiaries frequently results in changes on how we approach education, children we will evaluate and operate on, as well as the frequency of visits. Feedback from parents allows us to recommend changes in the post-discharge follow-up and care of their children who underwent an operation. Feedback from the local team also allows us to make changes in the medications and supplies we bring on our visits.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Novick Cardiac Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Novick Cardiac Alliance

Board of directors
as of 07/24/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. William Novick

Novick Cardiac Alliance

Term: 2015 - 2021

Donald Pemberton

Vice President/NCA

Srinadh Rao

Secretary/ NCA

Elizabeth Novick

Treasurer/ NCA

Sara Riahi

Special Projects/Development Director

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/24/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/09/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.