INSPIRE CUBA INC

Building trust through partnerships

aka Inspire Cuba   |   Parkland, FL   |  www.inspirecuba.org

Mission

Inspire Cuba rebuilds trust ties between Cubans and Americans through collaborative partnerships in areas like agriculture, infrastructure development, disaster relief, artistic sponsorship and educational support. ​

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Director

Mr. Christopher Vazquez

Compliance and Operations Director

Mr. Andy Garcia

Main address

7410 S Cypresshead Dr

Parkland, FL 33067 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-2227342

NTEE code info

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Inspire Cuba seeks to rebuild trust ties between ordinary Cubans and Americans through the implementation of collaborative partnerships in all areas permitted under general license exemption by United States laws; which currently includes: education, artistic sponsorship, disaster relief, humanitarian assistance and entrepreneurship support. We work to consolidate and connect a trusted partnership network of U.S. based non-profits doing work in Cuba with qualified Cuban based institutions and individuals. Our vision is to maximize the efficient support of humanitarian assistance to the island from the United States to help foster diplomacy efforts and community trust.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

School Supplies Program

Engaging the Florida University State System and a coalition of interested parties to provide school supplies donations to be distributed by our NGO partners in Cuba to impoverished rural primary schools located in the communities where our mechanization programs are implemented.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Provided equipment for reconstruction efforts and made grants to volunteering organizations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of multi-year grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Median grant amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to build bridges of communication between Cubans and Americans to foster trust-building initiatives in areas of common interest and high priority for Cubans like humanitarian assistance, technological innovation and culture based exchange programs

Responding to the needs of emerging Cuban entrepreneurs as defined by them by providing the physical equipment and tools they need to succeed in rebuilding the economy and building new infrastructure. We engage a wide range of actors in Cuba, including cooperative members, solo business leaders, non governmental organizations, academicians/ scientists and other experts in the fields we undertake to provide assistance with, interested businesses in the U.S. and other countries and organizations and government officials from both the U.S. and Cuba. We also partner with community centers run by churches and other independent inceptions to deliver educational programs and humanitarian assistance.

Our Board develops programs that places responsibilities outside the Board itself and onto our partners and funders. We work alongside the Foundations funding our cause and the partners helping us in order to involve their expertise in our decision making. We also have a Board of Advisors that monitors our activities and audits our financials in order to keep us accountable. Likewise, we provide access and open participation to members of the public into the affairs of the organization. Our funding comes mostly from a network of organizations interested in Cuban affairs.

We have become one of the few non profits who have successfully executed programs on the ground in Cuba from the U.S. and who have involved many businesses and partners in the process; thus, creating a network of parties interested in supporting a new open policy course for Cuba. In doing this, we have helped ordinary Cubans who needed our help and we have provided an opportunity for face to face interactions between Cubans and Cuban Americans.
We still hope to be able to do more and acquire more freedom in deciding who to help without the intervention of non governmental organizations operating in Cuba under the tutelage of the Cuban government in order to make our interactions with ordinary Cubans more authentic and effective. We also hope to gain more financial support from U.S. foundations and corporations that are not yet willing to fund or sponsor projects for Cuba for fears of violating US laws.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Underserve communities in Cuba identified through a variety of partners on the ground (churches, NGOs, and civil society groups).

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The Board recently worked to expand our religious partners in Cuba to include both Catholic and non-Catholic denominations in response to feedback from the communities we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

INSPIRE CUBA INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

INSPIRE CUBA INC

Board of directors
as of 6/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Christopher Vazquez

Inspire Cuba, Inc.

Term: 2022 - 2021

Jhon Cores

Andy Garcia

Marco Garcia

Karla Barrios

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/09/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.