ProduceGood

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Oceanside, CA   |  www.producegood.org

Mission

ProduceGood's mission is to build an active and engaged community committed to finding sustainable solutions to alleviate hunger, reclaim and repurpose waste and promote the health and well-being of all.

Notes from the nonprofit

With 40% of all food going wasted each year and 1 in 3 in SD County at-risk or struggling with food insecurity as a result of Covid, ProduceGood, with the help of our volunteer and grower community, diverted 244,000 pounds of unwanted produce from landfill to make accessible more than 700,000 portions of fresh produce for those in need in 2020 and we are ahead of those numbers in 2021. We are now picking 1.7 times per day. In addition to feeding people, our ongoing waste reduction translates to less greenhouse gas and more safety for all. Please donate today to support our ability to upcycle this surplus, fresh food supply to reduce hunger and waste in San Diego County.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director, Strategy & Finance/ Co-Founder

Ms. Alexandra White

Executive Director, Program & Outreach, Co-Founder

Ms Nita Kurmins Gilson

Main address

4057 Via De La Paz

Oceanside, CA 92057 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-2289712

NTEE code info

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In San Diego County since COVID, one in three are food insecure or at risk for food insecurity. This includeschildren, adults, seniors, homeless, veterans and their families. Yet, it is estimated that 40% of local fresh produce rots, goes to waste or gets plowed under each year. To address this problem, ProduceGood staff and volunteers is conducting 1.7 gleanings or picks per day to recover what would be wasted fresh produce from backyards and farms in San Diego County. We also provide a community of giving for our growers and volunteers. Residents with citrus trees and farmers with excess have the satisfaction of giving away their fruit and vegetables to those less fortunate. Individuals and organizations who volunteer with us are engaged and committed to our cause. ProduceGood attracts people of all backgrounds because our mission appeals to their sense of helping those in need. Our inclusive practices mobilize the strengths and capabilities of a diverse community to feed itself

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CropSwap

This program leverages volunteers of all ages and abilities to pick excess produce from San Diego County backyards and farms. Three services make it possible to reduce waste and hunger by engaging community to reduce waste and hunger. 1. Big Picks are large scaling backyard gleaning efforts where groups of volunteers harvest 800 pounds or more, which is then transported by Feeding San Diego or San Diego Food Pick. A variation of our Big Pick service is First Pick, where companies or organizations work with ProduceGood to organize a special pick event which allows them to team build and give back to the community as well as to the organization. 2. Quick Pick services launched in 2018 to benefit backyard growers with only a few trees. Pounds gleaned are generally between 50 and 500 with all harvested proceeds taken directly to networked receiving agencies who partner with ProduceGood. 3 is BumperCrop, our farm harvesting service where ProduceGood or its volunteers pick and/or transport rescued produce to benefit networked feeding agencies. CropSwap's success is a direct result of partnerships with San Diego Food Bank, Feeding San Diego, Coastal Roots Farm, and residential growers and farmers throughout the county. Produce gleaned by volunteers serves food-insecure children, families, seniors, veterans, homeless, and others.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

This program harvests seasonal produce from Farmers Markets in San Diego, leveraging teams of volunteers to recover unsold produce from weekly markets for delivery to local food pantries.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Through additional partnerships in San Diego County, ProduceGood is involved with community outreach and volunteer development to support existing activities in the following areas: produce upcycling job skills for workforce in disadvantaged communities, city-sponsored gleaning and general community education.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Food Recovery Challenge: Data Driven 2018

Environmental Protection Agency

Food Recovery Challenge: Data Driven 2019

Environmental Protection Agency

Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition 2019

Congressman Levin, 49th District

Affiliations & memberships

North County Alliance for Regional Solutions 2021

San Diego Hunger Coalition Advisory 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are now averaging 1.7 events per day, with smaller numbers of masked volunteers following COVID safety protocals.

Number of carbon emissions prevented (estimated by CO2 equivalent)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This total number of volunteers includes 722 who were active this past 12 months.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID has made all events virtual in 2020 and in first quarter of 2021 and for the foreseeable future.

Total number of active food generators

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our total umber of growers includes backyard or family growers and farmers. These numbers have steadily risen year over year since our inception.

Number of networked receiving agencies feeding those in need

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Leverage new and existing supply channels in 2021 to upcycle more than 600,000 servings of fresh produce into our charitable food supply for SD County's food-insecure.

Engage 2500+ volunteers to perform the activities required to upcycle the surplus produce from sources throughout the county at farmers markets, on farms and in residential fields and yards.

Partner with County farmers, residential growers, pantries, market vendors, volunteers and others to divert 200 tons in GHT avoidance.

Make the upcycling of surplus produce as ubiquitous and natural as recycling through efficient processes, sustainable practice and consistent support.

We engage in community gleaning practices on farms, in backyard orchards and at farmers markets to benefit San Diego County’s food-insecure through our two produce recovery programs, CropSwap and Market Share.

Our value proposition is unique in that we identify the source of excess produce and drive the activities required to move this surplus into our our Sustainable Produce Provision Network (SPPN). Success requires us to promote our services to the community, identify and bring on board food generators (local backyard residential growers and farmers), coordinate all upcycling activities, including the creation and execution of volunteer events to pick or receive the fresh produce, develop and manage receiving agency relationships, and assure the right amount of produce is being delivered so that we are not accidentally causing more waste.

We estimate that more than 200,000 individuals are touched annually by our supply of more than fifty feeding organizations.

ProduceGood was founded in 2014 as a non-profit by three women looking to alleviate both hunger and waste in San Diego County, beginning with a program that leveraged the power of a North County community initiative called CropSwap, spearheaded since 2010 by one of the founders, Nita Kurmins Gilson.

The founders' creativity, energy, individual professional backgrounds and skills and collective commitment to the ProduceGood mission are integral to ProduceGood's capabilities and capacity.

Two of the founders plus one full-time and one part-time employee comprise the head count for staff. These plus the third founder, who volunteers approximately 20 hours per week as an administrator, account for program and operations management, organization administration, program field operations and development. Add to this a dedicated and hands-on board and advisory group and it becomes more clear how a small organization can accomplish so much.

100 percent of our food rescue is accomplished by volunteers of all ages, beliefs and abilities. Occasionally we are able to contract with Urban Corps of San Diego for teams of corpsmembers and supervisors to be trained to glean for us but at this time there is no contract in place.

Our trajectory, by any measure, has been very steep, from 6,000 LBs/18,000 servings supplied in 2014 to over 244,000 LBs/732,000 servings upcycled into the charitable food supply in 2020. We have grown from a staff of 1 to a staff of 3.5. In 2014 we had 10 backyard growers and in 2021 we have more than 500 backyard growers and farmers. Our sustainable produce provision network has grown from one food bank at the outset to 52 feeding agencies which give away our servings or package them with meals for San Diego's most vulnerable. In 2020, we received more than $638,000 in monetary donations and $287,000 as gift-in-kind service time, miles driven, produce donated or other, which is largely due to our incredible, active Board of Directors and our volunteers, which have grown from 48 in 2014 to 2500 in 2020.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People who are struggling with or are at risk for food insecurity. Residents and farmers who have surplus or unwanted fruit and vegetables Individuals within the community who want to increase access for all to fresh fruit and vegetables

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    other,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Covid changed everything for us, as it did every organization. Our Growers did not want large groups of volunteers on their property. Our volunteers would not be safe in large groups. The two large food banks we had served for years needed to back away from receiving our large amounts of fresh produce and then transporting it across county due to their need to set up emergency feeding for the hungry and newly hungry, and there was a clear rise in food insecurity we all needed to address. This began a new level of coordination to ensure that our small household groups of masked volunteers could arrive on the property, pick and transport the fresh produce to our receivers, and create immediate access to fresh produce by the food insecure.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

ProduceGood
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ProduceGood

Board of directors
as of 5/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Jerilyn White

ProduceGood

Term: 2018 - 2020


Board co-chair

Ms. Liz Sheahan

ProduceGood

Term: 2017 - 2019

Alexandra White

ProduceGood ED-nonvoting

Ronald Eng

ProduceGood

Christina Kettler

Brand manager, consultant

Caitlin Holleran

CPA, Sr Manager, Deloitte

Nita Gilson

ProduceGood ED--nonvoting

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/29/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.