Parents of Addicted Loved Ones

You are not alone.

aka PAL   |   Phoenix, AZ   |  www.palgroup.org

Mission

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) provides hope, through education and support, to parents of addicted loved ones. We offer free of charge, peer-support groups throughout the United States. Our vision is to make PAL meetings available to all parents of addicted loved ones.

Ruling year info

2018

CEO/Executive Director

Kim Humphrey

Main address

11225 N. 28th Drive, Suite B109

Phoenix, AZ 85029 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-3131409

NTEE code info

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

PAL was formed by Michael Speakman, LISAC, who worked as an in-patient substance abuse counselor. He saw a need to provide education and networking support for the parents and families of addicted adult loved ones, helping them find the balance between support and enabling. As the demand grew, Speakman saw the need for PAL meetings to grow and gave the program to a set of parents who formed the non-profit. For those not exposed to the disease of addiction, it has hard to understand the impacts on parents. Often, extended family, friends and co-workers are unaware of challenges parents face due to misplaced feelings of shame and a lack of understanding of the disease of addiction in much of the population. Parents exhaust their financial resources helping their loved one in the wrong ways, and stress and anxiety cause personal health issues and failing performance at work and in other relationships. PAL helps parents find joy in their lives and hope for their loved one!

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

PAL Groups

Weekly meetings, of primarily parents, are led by trained volunteer peer-facilitators to learn and to support each other in dealing with the issues of addicted adult children. The meetings use evidence-based practices. A curriculum of lessons addressing topics such as enabling, co-dependency and healthy adult relationships is used in the education portion of the meetings. It takes about four months to cover the full set of lessons as well as opportunities such as testimonies by individuals in recovery. In addition, there is the opportunity to share and ask for suggestions from those attending the meeting.

Population(s) Served
Parents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

PAL Groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Attendance at PAL meetings is confidential. About 40% of our meetings report attendance. This is reported data only. The pandemic impacted reporting and attendance. Reporting began 12/2019.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

PAL Groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Data was not tracked prior to 2020.

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

PAL Groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The pandemic negatively impacted our in-person meetings beginning in 2020. Some meetings changed to virtual and continue in that format and are included in the count.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

PAL Groups

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This reflects only PAL meeting volunteers. Peer-volunteers are responsible for starting and continuing meetings. Prior to 2021, focus was on tracking meetings and change in facilitators.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

PAL seeks to help parents deal with the issues surrounding the addiction of an adult son or daughter. By helping parents deal with the emotional, financial and physical challenges of addition, their adult children are often led to face and address their addiction.

All those who attend PAL meetings hear the meeting preamble that ends with '... it is our desire that by attending our meetings you will learn proven ways to help your loved one and ultimately learn to find joy in your own life regardless of the choices of your loved ones.'

Weekly PAL group meetings are our cornerstone program – this is where participants receive both education and peer support. PAL meetings last about 90 minutes and are facilitated by a peer volunteer with about half the time spent on the education and the other half on sharing and asking for suggestions.

Educational lessons includes topics on co-dependency, health and unhealthy helping, enabling, recovery, delayed emotional growth and others. During the discussion of the lesson, parents share their experiences and steps they took to address the concepts in their own situation. In the second half of the meeting, the parents are offered the opportunity to check-in to share what is happening in their present life challenges. During check-in, the parents may request and receive suggestions from the other meeting attendees.

Raising awareness of PAL and attracting impacted parents to start new meetings is essential to making PAL meetings available where needed. Outreach to touchpoints where parents might disclose their situation is done through contractors and by volunteers identifying and contacting such places. Brochures are provided for making referrals to PAL meetings. In addition, social media, advertising, and seeking opportunities to present or be covered in the media are areas of focus for spreading the word about PAL to families in need.

Northern Arizona University is partner in evaluating PAL's effectiveness through pre- and post- attendance surveys of meeting participants. This feedback provides information that is useful for modifying the program or outreach.

PAL is based in Phoenix and has five full-time staff that run the business of PAL. This includes identifying, recruiting, training, coordinating and supporting the nearing 400 peer-parent volunteers who establish and facilitate our meetings throughout the United States. PAL awareness campaigns are also a key role of the staff.

Foundations and grantors are instrumental in providing resources to perform targeted outreach.

Over the last five years, PAL has progressed from a full volunteer board member run organization to a staffed organization with the board moving to a policy making and support role. We have progressed from start-up to growth phase as an organization.

PAL meeting growth had a set-back with the pandemic. With the current staffing levels, the organization is again focused on growing meetings and has completed an assessment of meetings that did not sustain through the pandemic forced moves to virtual settings. That assessment did remove a large number of meetings and volunteer facilitators from our program, but we are now aiming to add 100 active facilitators and are making sound progress toward that goal each month. Other goals focus on starting meetings in every state and in the most populous cities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    PAL provides free of charge volunteer facilitated peer-support groups for parents of addicted loved ones throughout the United States. We primarily encourage and provide weekly in-person meetings, but also offer online meetings for those unable to attend an in-person meeting including a Spanish language on-line meeting. Our demographics are generally parents over 50 years old with most being women. Any sober person 18 years or older with a loved one with Substance Use Disorder is welcome at our meetings.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Northern Arizona University conducts pre- and post- attendance surveys of meeting attendees. The last study was conducted during the pandemic when most of our meetings were virtual. The study raised awareness that some people we serve prefer or need online meetings. That same study concluded that PAL meetings are more effective in-person. To address those needing online meetings, we recently introduced the concept of local online meetings. Previously our online meetings were all nationally focused. Building personal relationships with and learn about local resources from peers are key reasons in-person meetings are more effective. Local online meetings are designed to serve individuals in a similar area to at a minimum create sharing about local resources.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Northern Arizona University is conducting a new survey and we added questions to help us learn how people found our meetings. The goal is to improve our outreach so that families in need know that PAL exists. We understand we aren't the experts and value input from our customers including the volunteers who make the meetings happen. We are also upping our surveying of facilitators through an annual survey and other means such as quarterly meeting with new facilitators. Facilitators are also customers as they are all parents of an addicted loved one as well.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, attending our meetings is anonymous, which limits follow-up,

Financials

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones

Board of directors
as of 09/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mary Peters

Consultant (former US Secretary of Transportation)

Term: 2019 - 2023

Dave Otto

IRS Attorney (retired)

Diane Landis

CPA

Jose Gonzalez

Pastor

Joseph Landin

Owner, Helping Hand Auto

Michael Burnidge

Pastor, Scottsdale Bible Church

Cynthia Claus

Director of Health Programs, Phoenix Area Indian Health

Ashley Worthington

Living Hope Counseling, Licensed Counselor

John Brotherton

Goldman Sachs, VP

John Allen

Maricopa County Treasurer

Martin LaRoche

MVP Consulting Group, CEO

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/19/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/19/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.