Fetching Tails Foundation

Itasca, IL   |  www.fetchingtailsfoundation.org

Mission

Fetching Tails Foundation is an 501c3 Illinois based non-breed specific rescue committed to saving dogs regardless of breed, age, and physical ability. Our foundation is committed to lowering euthanasia rates by rescuing adoptable dogs from high kill-shelters and other animal intake facilities and placing them in approved adopted homes. We are dedicated to helping our community through educational programs and combined efforts for spay & neuter clinics.

Ruling year info

2015

President

Linda Wyka

Main address

PO Box 463

Itasca, IL 60143 USA

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EIN

47-3210253

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Fetching Good Manners

Fetching Tails Foundation strongly endorses training programs to help all dogs be the best canine companions they can be. We encourage all our adopters to enroll in local training courses after adopting a new dog as it reinforces good behavior in the pet, but also helps a new dog and its owner bond with each other in an enriching, positive environment. However, some of the dogs we rescue need training help before adoption to help them learn the socialization and manners they need to be successful in a forever home. Through our Fetching Good Manners program, adoptable dogs are able to attend weekly positive reinforcement classes with their foster parent to work on basic commands and socialize with people and other dogs as appropriate. Additionally, if a dog needs more in-depth training, a training partner visits the foster home for one-on-one sessions. When a dog that has gone through a training program gets adopted, the trainers also follow through to make sure the family understands what the dog has learned to ensure both the dog and humans will have a happy life together.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Fetching Tails Foundation's Fetch It Forward program was designed to help pet owners in need of assistance to obtain medical services for their pets at a reduced cost with the goal of keeping the pet with his/her family rather than being surrendered to a shelter. By applying for assistance, you agree to visit our partner veterinarian at an agreed upon date and time, spay and neuter your pet if he or she is unaltered, and you agree to pay Fetching Tails Foundation (FTF) for half of your pet’s services.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This program was designed to give enrichment to our dogs while engaging our youth to make a difference in rescues dog's lives.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Enriching our dogs at our intake facility with our field trip program from shopping, forest preserves and even sleepovers to get to learn more about them while keeping their mind busy and enriched

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are trying to reduce the number of local homeless/unclaimed dogs that are euthanized and instead find them loving adoptive homes. In addition to bringing as many as we responsibly can into our own rescue program, we are trying to build relationships with other local rescues to network and promote dogs in need so we can all save as many dog lives as we can.

We prioritize saving dogs of all ages, breeds, and physical ability locally and pulling as many as we can into our rescue. As a foster-based rescue (which means dogs live with volunteers at their homes until they are adopted), we can only save as many dogs as we have foster homes available. We do a number of education and outreach programs (including presentations at libraries and schools as well as booths at local festivals) to increase the number of volunteers and foster homes we have. We also strongly believe that rescue is a team effort – and no one rescue has the means to save every single dog – so we have put great effort into to working together with other rescues and animal advocates in order to save as many lives as possible. We are a co-founding member of the Chicagoland Rescue Intervention and Support Program (CRISP), which seeks to reduce the number of owner-surrendered pets entering Chicago Animal Care & Control, the city's open-access, high-intake shelter. CRISP helps families with financial and emotional support if they would like to keep their pets but need help, or diverts the pet to a rescue group if the family cannot keep so the animal never has to enter the shelter and be exposed to illness or risk euthanasia if the shelter is full to capacity.

We currently have more than 125 volunteers and about 50 foster homes to save dogs in need and find them their ideal forever homes. Because of their dedication, we are able to save a large number of special-needs dogs and have programs in place such as our Fetching Good Manners program and our Canine Flu Fund to help dogs with medical or behavioral issues find homes and happily ever afters that they deserve. Through the CRISP program, a team of our volunteers spend multiple days per month helping at the city shelter, either providing support for families that want to keep their pets but need assistance, or networking and finding rescue for relinquished pets so they do not have to enter the overwhelmed shelter.

In 4 years, our rescue has saved and found adoptive homes for more than 1,300 dogs. We have increased the number of foster homes so at any time we have 50-60 dogs and puppies in our rescue and available for adoption. Additionally, more than 2,000 animals have been helped through the CRISP program. As an organization, we have a special interest and desire to help dogs with major medical issues and special needs and want to continue to expand our capabilities to do so.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We asked the backbone of our rescue group which is our fosters what is their least favorite thing about fostering. The main answer was adminsntrative. We tried out having someone take care of the administrative applications.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our board,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Fetching Tails Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Fetching Tails Foundation

Board of directors
as of 1/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Linda Wyka

Fetching Tails Foundation

Term: 2015 - 2021

Doreen Wos

Kristen Gottschalk

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/14/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.