PLATINUM2023

ANTINANCO

Cultures + Generations + Hearts = Connected

Holmdel, NJ   |  www.antinanco.org

Mission

Antinanco is committed to preserving traditional and indigenous knowledge, and providing public access to education beyond the classroom walls through nature experiences, hands-on projects, international cultural exchange programs and environmental conservation projects. \n\nWe teach practical earth-based skills, arts, cultural and food sovereignty and security, mindfulness, peaceful dialogue and emotional empowerment. We provide and promote all types of education about the Earth, its inhabitants and ecosystems, educating about the impact of our actions on the surrounding environment. We support local and indigenous communities through education and direct relief, both financial and in-kind.

Ruling year info

2015

Managing Director

Joseph Arnold Resch

Main address

46 Seven Oaks Cir

Holmdel, NJ 07733 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-3280825

NTEE code info

Agricultural, Youth Development (O52)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today youth lack opportunities to spend time outdoors. Many of our participants come from the environments that do not provide a channel for recreational or educational experiences in nature. The majority of our population comes from New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. About 50% of the kids come from the urban and inner city areas like Brooklyn NY, Camden NJ, Newark NJ and Philadelphia, PA. Due to the lack of opportunities to access hands-on experiential education in nature, we consider these kids at-risk. We work in our own backyards with our sons and daughters and engage youth from urban environments in our outdoor learning experiences and hands-on projects, helping them to develop awareness about environmental issues and appreciation for our planet and its resources.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Indigenous Support Programs

The Programs stemmed from the need to address the COVID-19-related health and nutritional challenges on Native American Reservations. The Native Communities were and continue to be disproportionally affected by COVID-19 and other chronic health issues due to diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, asthma and cancer as a result of Indian Country's economic and health disparities. We work with on-the-ground partners across five Native American reservations to provide direct relief, wellness, clean water and solar energy solutions, and assist with internal capacity building to strengthen food security and sovereignty. Our primary focus is on elders, single parent/no parent households, and remotely-located households, which are many times overlooked and underserved.

Population(s) Served
Families
Indigenous peoples
Single parents
Homeless people
Out-of-home youth

The Project commenced in 2018. The primary focus of the Project is on the preservation of the American Chestnut tree and other native medicinal and food-producing plants, with the goal to safeguard and re-introduce environmentally vulnerable species. The American Chestnut tree is native to the North American forest ecosystem and is on the brink of extinction. In the first half of the 20th century, 1 out of 4 trees across the 180 million acre range of eastern forests were killed by an accidentally introduced pathogen, the Chestnut blight. The loss to date of the American Chestnut is cited as one of the worst ecological disasters in the US. We restore a functionally extinct and endangered species, maximize public involvement, and enhance the value and access to local food sources and the public appreciation of them.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Adults
Children and youth
Substance abusers
Seniors

The programs focus on bringing children outdoors, interacting with native and indigenous communities, working on art and music projects, engaging in environmental and building projects, performing community service and learning about the importance of protecting our environment. During these programs, we learn traditions, history and cultures, transform our perception of dark historical events (ie the Holocaust) through art and music projects, plant gardens, build garden beds and bird houses, and learn to identify various plant, bird and animal species. These programs commenced in 2015. Currently, we serve about 250-300 children per year.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth
Children

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Maximum number of participants allowed on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students showing interest in topics related to STEM

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The objective is that by the end of any given program all participants learn at least one new practical skill appropriate for their age and school level, contribute meaningfully to an environmental project and spend at least 15 hours outdoors. Approximately 45% of our students receive full or partial scholarships. Change does not happen overnight. To insure continuity, ongoing connection and outreach to new communities, we maintain online forum through which a continued dialogue is held. Currently, we outreach to about 2,000 youth (including scout groups) online. We provide digital and instructional materials along with seedlings and seeds, and encourage kids to go outside, plant trees and help the environment in other ways. We invite kids to share their impressions with us for further discussion.

Providing a sufficient range of teaching styles. Providing team setting, project-style and child-lead teaching, allowing teachers to adopt to students' unique skills and abilities. Providing learning experiences in unique and natural settings, allowing participants to develop knowledge through the dialogue with the natural world and communities. Ensuring diligent monitoring and continuous feedback through interviews, surveys, reports. Providing access to positive role models and mentors.

Wide outreach through our website, mailing lists, and social media (over 8,000 fans across the social media groups and pages). Competent team of 8 board members and 20 staff members and permanent volunteers. Wide variety of programs and settings. Affiliations with supporting foundations and community organizations.

Consistent and continuous program offerings, guided by committed and dedicated teachers. We have seen significant improvement in our second year programs based on the assessments that have been done in the first year. The majority of our students came back in the second year, our attrition rate is only about 4%.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

ANTINANCO
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ANTINANCO

Board of directors
as of 02/13/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mariana Bernstein

Galina Shekoff

Mariana Bernstein

Mt. Sinai University

Barnaby Ruhe

New York University

Jeff Inti Keim

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/13/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.