Alianza Nacional De Campesinas Inc.

aka Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, Inc.   |   Oxnard, CA   |  http://alianzanacionaldecampesinas.org

Mission

Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, Inc.’s mission is to unify the struggle and promote leadership of campesinas in a national movement to create major visibility and advocate for changes that defend their human rights.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Mily Treviño-Sauceda

Main address

PO Box 20033

Oxnard, CA 93034 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-3486630

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (J01)

Employee & Workers' Rights (R29)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (K01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

More than 700,000 farmworker women (campesinas) labor in agricultural fields across the country. Despite their work of planting, picking, and packing the fruits and vegetables that people eat daily and the huge contribution they make to our economy, campesinas are among the most exploited, undervalued, and least protected workers in our country. Most have no sick leave or health coverage. Their wages are stolen. They live in deplorable conditions. Thousands are sexually harassed and assaulted on the job. If they complain, they are dismissed or threatened with deportation. They face constant exposure to pesticides which studies show causes infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects in babies. Many suffer from heat stress. COVID-19 has had a major impact on farmworkers, exacerbating all of the above problems and creating others--widespread hunger; inability to get tested, to quarantine or get medical treatment; to pay rent & utilities; to buy basic products (pampers, formula, etc.).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Peer-to-Peer Outreach and Community Education

This program provides information to farmer worker women (campesinas) and organizations that serve them about Alianza's four key issue areas: Violence Against Women and Girls; Labor and Employment Standards; Pesticides; Immigration; and most recently COVID-19. The information covers a) the nature and scope of the problems, b) the services and resources available, c) the rights of campesinas, and d) actions they can take to protect themselves and to exercise their rights. Approaches used include those that resonate with the target audiences (campesinas with limited English proficiency, low reading levels), which often the campesinas, themselves, design & create. Methods include popular education, theater/teatro (skits and vignettes), house meetings, and art projects. Most of the theatrical presentations are scripted and performed by the campesinas themselves and are designed to establish confianza (trust) among the audiences, many of whom have not broached some of the topics before. Also used are fotonovelas and infographics. Often the information about such topics as pesticides, heat stress and COVID-19 is disseminated in the fields or as the workers are leaving the fields.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Families

Alianza and its member organizations have helped create farmworker women’s programs or organizations from the ground up and have provided training and technical assistance to help strengthen existing programs and initiatives that may need to develop expertise in specific areas. Training & TA provided by Alianza staff or by staff from member organizations to date has included: 1) T&TA to farmworker women’s organizations on how to conduct effective outreach to farmworker women on sexual harassment and violence in the workplace; 2) T&TA and tools for assisting women and girls who have suffered from workplace sexual harassment and violence; 3) T&TA and tools for assisting women who are victims/survivors of domestic violence; Training and TA on Labor Rights and Standards; and T&TA on the dangers of Pesticides. We are hoping to develop curriculum and training that addresses the specific dangers of pesticides on women, including their reproductive health and the health of their infant children.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Families

A key feature of Alianza is the involvement of campesinas in all facets of our work—from serving as board members, staff, consultants, peer trainers, etc. Several of Alianza member organizations have created leadership development models for developing leadership among farm worker women and for helping them build their political power. Premier among them has been Lideres Campesinas which has won statewide recognition in California for its peer-to-peer leadership development and empowerment model, which Alianza now uses as a model for its emerging member organizations. In addition to being trained as organizers, Campesinas are encouraged to assume leadership roles in their local communities, including on school boards, PTA, local commissions, etc., as well as ambassadors who help to educate local, state, and national elected officials and heads of agencies about the specific concerns and needs of campesina workers and families. They do this through sharing testimonies about their life and work experiences and about the specific concerns and needs of farmworker women.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Families

Alianza and its member organizations engage in various types of advocacy, including administrative, legislative, and grassroots in order to inform political leaders and agency representatives at local, state and federal levels about the unique needs and concerns of farmworker women. Activities include: a) advocating for changes to the administrative systems and processes that agencies use to accept and process claims to ensure that farmworker women can access protections under existing laws and can meaningfully participate in investigations of violations against them; b) advocating with local, state and federal agencies (e.g., USDA, EPA) to improve the level of care and responsiveness to farmworker victims’ and survivors’ unique needs; c) providing information, including testimonies to government agencies and other groups to improve laws and systems that serve farmworkers; e) providing information to political leaders at all levels to advocate for necessary reforms to immigration, employment, education, health and a range of substantive areas of laws that do not adequately provide protections that are necessary for farmworker women and girls to live and work with dignity. Our policy platforms and work are based on the needs, concerns, and recommendations of the farmworker women (campesinas), themselves.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Migrant workers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new advocates recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Policy & Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have provided trainings for our board and staff, for staff from our member orgs and for farmworker women on gender-based violence, labor rights and dangers of & protection against pesticides.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Alianza has several goals and objectives: 1) to reach tens of thousands of farmworker women and girls (campesinas), providing them with the tools, training, & technical assistance they need to organize and advocate for their own security, safety, well-being and livelihood and helping to ensure that there are essential protections for their health and safety. 2) as an alliance/ network of 15 farmworker serving organizations we work to bring unity and coherence to this growing, but greatly under-supported and underrepresented movement of campesinas. 3) to ensure that campesinas have a place at decision-making tables and a unified voice at forums that set the agenda for issues of critical importance to them and their families. 4) to raise public awareness and mobilize farmworkers and their families and communities around the major issues confronting campesinas through a series of high profile campaigns such as the Satchel (Morralitos) Campaign; the Apron (Mandiles) Campaign and more recently the Campesinas Rising/Campesinas de Pie national project; 5) to put an end to the exploitation and abuse of farmworker women and girls, including sexual harassment and sexual assault in the workplace; 6) we advocate for the labor rights of farmworkers, helping to ensure that agencies enforce regulations that protect their health and safety; and fight to defend and promote their human rights and dignity. We do so hand-in-hand with the campesinas, themselves, who inform and help carry out the work at every step; 7) most recently, we are bringing attention to the devastating impact and effects COVID-19 continues to have on these essential workers and are supporting local efforts to meet their immediate needs for food, protective equipment, COVID testing, medical attention, help with rent & utilities, etc., as well as pushing for their inclusion in legislative support packages and other forms of financial assistance at local, state & national levels.

1) First, we created an Alianza (Alliance) of farmworker women and girls (campesinas) and organizations that work with them to unify local efforts into a coherent, united national effort. At this time, we have 15 member organizations in 10 states and the District of Columbia.
2) We partner with funders, ally organizations, universities, research groups, health clinics/medical personnel, media, key agency reps (e.g., EPA, OSHA) and other supporters to leverage resources and enhance our expertise, as well as to inform their work.
3) We provide leadership development--preparing campesinas to serve on our board of directors and those of other farmworker organizations; provide peer-to-peer training and TA to help create or strengthen existing grassroots campesina organizations in various regions of the country; provide training to farmworker women to enable them to build their outreach, organizing, political and advocacy skills & experience, and become involved in bringing about change.
4) We advocate for policies that will improve the health, safety, and wellbeing of campesinas, their families and communities and against harmful practices.
5) We work with local, state and national media to raise awareness about the problems/challenges confronting campesinas and about the work Alianza & its member organizations do to bring about change.
6) We help organize public awareness and mobilization campaigns in states where our members are located to raise awareness and help mobilize and organize farmworkers, their families & communities around our four priority issues areas: pesticides, gender violence, labor issues, and immigration. Alianza and its members use approaches that resonate with our constituents most of whom speak little or no English, some who are Indigenous speak little or no Spanish and have low literacy levels. These approaches include the use of theater/teatro (skits and vignettes), house meetings, art, fotonovelas, puppet shows, info graphics, etc.
7) We are providing support to our member organizations to address the devastating and disproportionate effects that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on farmworker families & communities. We instituted first, weekly, now bi-monthly meetings to share information about the specific problems/challenges encountered in our respective states, to share experiences, knowledge, ideas, and resources. We raise funds to provide stipends to our members to enhance their ability to work locally to garner & provide resources including food, masks, hand sanitizers and basic hygiene products, as well as assistance with rent and utilities, and making COVID-testing, medical attention accessible; 8) We are providing the training needed by our staff, organizers, and campesinas to carry out remote learning, trainings, meetings, outreach and mobilizing/organizing efforts. We have started a series of remote trainings around our 4 Priority Issue areas which are being very well received.

Alianza has met with success in reaching many of its stated goals and objectives. Beginning in 2011:
1) We created an Alianza (Alliance) of 15 member organizations in 11 states in various regions of the country to ensure that campesinas have a place at the decision-making tables and a unified voice at forums that set the agenda for issues of critical importance to them and their families. 2) In 2013, after an extensive process of dialogue & deliberation, delegates from Alianza’s member organizations voted on four substantive policy/issue areas to address: a) ending violence against women and girls; b) creating fair labor and employment standards;
c) addressing exposure to pesticides; and d) helping to create a less punitive and more humane and just immigration system. 3) In 2019, for the 1st time, we received funding from a few major foundations, including NoVo and OSF, to help us build our infrastructure and provide leadership development. That funding helped us: a) provide leadership development training for our board members, as well as training in some of our priority issue areas; b) hire staff for key positions and train them our priority issue areas; c) set up our administrative and financial systems; d) create & administer an assessment tool to ascertain the needs and assets of each of our member organizations; e) provide leadership training for campesinas and for staff from some of our member organizations, as well as training in some of our key priority issue areas, including Gender Violence, Pesticides, Labor Rights. Similar trainings will continue in other issue areas until everyone is well-versed in how we work and in each of our priority issue areas. f) create and begin to implement a 3-year Workplan; 4) In response to the COVID pandemic, we created a COVID-19 Plan of Action and a COVID Relief Fund to help us and our member organizations address several crises in our communities created and/or made worse by this pandemic.

Considering that prior to 2019, Alianza had received no major funding, we believe that in this short period of time we have made tremendous strides. First we had to establish our infrastructure including setting up basic administrative and financial systems; initially setting up and office; provide orientation and training for our board of directors; hire and provide orientation for staff. Once that was set up we began with our programmatic work--outreach, trainings, public awareness & mobilizing campaigns, media work, and start developing policy & advocacy platforms. Unfortunately, the COVID pandemic interrupted a national Convivencia (Convening of 50+ Campesinas, advocates, and representatives from government agencies) which we had scheduled for April to gather testimonies and other information to inform help create our Policy & Advocacy Platforms. Instead, our organizers have had to collect testimonies from campesinas in the field, mostly by telephone for health reasons. We are working with EarthJustice to create a video, using the testimonies that we have collected, that will be used to educate legislators, as well as be posted on our website, social media outlets, etc.
Because some of our first funding was to combat violence against campesinas at home and in the workplace, our initial trainings and outreach activities were focused on this Priority Issue area. Alianza staff and staff from some of its member organizations travelled around the country in 2018 and the first part of 2019 speaking to a variety of audiences in order to share information and raise awareness about workplace exploitation and sexual harassment against farmworker women, domestic workers, etc. Given that we cannot have in-person meetings or trainings, in recent months, we have started a series of virtual trainings around Pesticides, Heat Stress, and COVID health & safety issues, which are being well received. We are also working to develop and promote virtual public awareness campaigns in the coming year around all our 4 priority issues areas. We will continue to support the work of our member organizations as they continue to garner local resources to help campesina families survive the health and economic crises which they confront on a daily basis as a result of COVID, in addition to the other labor, health, housing, and gender violence related problems they were already facing and which have continued unabated.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Alianza Nacional De Campesinas Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Alianza Nacional De Campesinas Inc.

Board of directors
as of 1/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Elizabeth Cordero

Rural Coalition

Term: 2020 - 2022


Board co-chair

Emma Torres

Campesinos Sin Fronteras

Term: 2020 - 2022

Lorena Andrade

Mujer Obrera

Maria Perales-Sanchez

Centro de los Derechos del Migrante

Cristina Aldana

Farmworker Association of Florida

Beatriz Gatica

Mujeres Divinas

Emma Torres

Campesinos Sin Fronteras

Elizabeth Cordero

Rural Coalition

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/16/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data