Healing Housing, Inc.

Love lives here.

Brentwood, TN   |  www.healinghousing.org

Mission

To shelter and love women healing from addiction. Healing Housing helps women recovering from alcohol and substance abuse addiction live independent, healthy, and sober lives.

Notes from the nonprofit

Since we opened our doors in March of 2017, our leadership team, board, volunteers and partners, have welcomed vulnerable residents with open arms. What started as a dream to provide safe and affordable housing to women seeking recovery has evolved into a program with full wrap-around services that provide a supportive, immersive recovery community. Through our built-in savings program, residents are able to purchase their own cars, and build nest eggs to help them start fresh when they graduate our program. As the women of HH heal, they leave the court system, contribute to the local workforce and economy, and change the lives of their children, families and community. Being able to walk alongside and cheer on a woman as she changes her life is a gift to all who have been a part of the journey. We believe each woman is deserving of grace and a new beginning.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Ms. Tracey Levine

Main address

PO Box 2385

Brentwood, TN 37024 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-3758041

NTEE code info

Low-Cost Temporary Housing (includes Youth Hostels) (L40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hundreds of women exit drug treatment programs in Tennessee each year. These women must have a safe, loving place to turn in order to grow in their sobriety; without such a place, nearly 70% of them will relapse. Many times, however, these women do not have anywhere safe to go and no money to pay for their needs. Unfortunately, the availability of secure, nurturing residences for women in need is at crisis proportions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Personalized Healing Plan

HH provides residents with an individualized and nurturing program, and stable environment essential in supporting the regeneration of critical brain neural pathways that is occurring in the newly sober.
While at HH, each resident works toward the following goals: developing a supportive community, and practices to support mental and physical health stabilization, financial sustainability, and strong spiritual connection of their own choosing.

To support these goals we offer:
Psychiatric evaluation and medication management
Housing and related costs
Individual therapy and group counseling
Intensive outpatient program specific to women’s relapse triggers
Personal savings program ($75 out of $125 weekly fee into their savings)
Health care
Vocational training
Financial counseling
Outside employment

HH incurs all costs associated with all programming as well provides groceries, hygiene items, linens, and transportation at no cost to women for the first 9-weeks of care.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Substance abusers
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse

Where we work

Awards

Roslyn S. Jaffe Award Nominee 2017

Ascena Foundation

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Healing Housing addresses the physical, spiritual, and emotional needs of women in the Davidson County/Williamson County areas. Two homes were opened in April 2017. The Healing Housing program offers a wide range of opportunities that promote healing and restoration:
• Individualized Healing Plan
• 12-Step recovery work
• Outside employment
• Required savings program
• Access to counseling
• Financial planning and budgeting
• Community involvement
• Life skills training
• Enrichment activities
Our vision is that residents will continue to grow in their sobriety, experience healing and restoration, and move forward towards independence, living lives of purpose and integrity.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve women who are in recovery from alcohol and drug addiction. They often come directly from substance use treatment facilities and many are required to be in the program by the courts, or referred by case managers. Many residents have served jail or prison time, come to us homeless, and all have no, or very limited, financial resources. They have experienced abuse and trauma in childhood, have damaged family relationships, including loss of their children – due to their addiction. Women are 18 and over, and range in age from mid-20’s to 60’s. Our referrals come from Next Door, 21st District Recovery Court, Buffalo Valley, and Mirror Lake among others.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, TN-ARR,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Over the last couple years, Healing Housing residents have increasingly expressed a need for ongoing access, as well as a personal connection, with a mental health professional. The women we serve have ACE scores at a minimum of 6, are usually dual-diagnosed and have experienced infrequent and fractured mental health care throughout their lives (if at all). Instead of seeing whoever might be working at the clinic that day, residents wanted someone they could trust and build a relationship with. For this reason, we began the process of seeking funding to hire a psychiatric nurse practitioner, and we are truly grateful that recently we received the grant, and have completed the hiring process. Residents and staff are truly enthusiastic and the NP is already making a true difference

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Two recent additions to our program, the NP mentioned above, and a workshop series on grief, were implemented due to collaborating with residents. It has been remarkable to witness the level of commitment and interest that women have to these programs when they are developed with their input. The power is shared, and the program benefits from it powerfully.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Healing Housing, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Healing Housing, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 12/01/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

David Jones Harper

First Horizon

Term: 2020 - 2023

Mike Harper

Urgent Care Group

Sherrie Cavin

Real Estate

Angela Deane

Community Volunteer

David Hettinger

CPA

David Jones

First Tennessee Bank

Angela Goode

Meharry Medical

Doug Ralls

Community Member

Jane Roach

Community Member

Leslie Hotzfeld

Brentwood United Methodist

Suzanne Johnston

Episcopal Church of the Resurrection

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/17/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data