PLATINUM2023

EAST AFRICAN CHILDREN'S FUND

Food - Health - Opportunity

St Clr Shores, MI   |  www.eacfund.org

Mission

East African Children's Fund strengthens school communities by mobilizing women and other local leaders to engage in agriculture that nourishes children's bodies and minds. To date, we’ve provided 3.2 million nutritious school meals to children and youth from rural communities in Kenya. 100% DIRECT GIVING: 100% of your donations strengthen school communities in rural Kenya to promote access to education.

Notes from the nonprofit

In 2023, we expanded our school garden program to 4 additional local schools in rural Kenya to grow micro-nutrient dense vegetables and fruits for an additional 777 school children.

Ruling year info

2015

President, Executive Director

Lisa Peracchio

Treasurer and Founding Director

Doris Mbabu

Main address

100 Maple Park Blvd Ste 130

St Clr Shores, MI 48081-2253 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-3912134

NTEE code info

Agricultural Programs (K20)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (B12)

Agricultural, Youth Development (O52)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Imagine choosing between sending your children to school or being able to feed them. This is a decision faced by most families within our partner communities in rural Kenya. Most families are subsistence farmers, relying upon rain fed agriculture for both food and income. Almost all women in our community gardens program report that they are unable to pay school fees when harvests are poor. Eighty percent of families in our partner communities report their children miss lunch due to a lack of food at home. School feeding programs increase school attendance and retention. Almost all women in our programs value school meals as important with 20% willing to have their children walk even further to attend a school with a meal program. About one-third of all school children in Africa are covered by school feeding programs. In East Africa, however, only 20% of schools provide meals. Of 36 African countries studied, Kenya ranks near the bottom for coverage of school feeding.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

HOME GROWN SCHOOL MEAL PROGRAMS TO PROMOTE ACCESS TO EDUCATION

East African Children's Fund partners with school communities (children, youth, teachers, staff, parents and local leadership) in rural Kenya to:
1. Develop and support food security programs: horticulture (highly nutritious fruits and vegetables),
agriculture (small livestock and beekeeping) and aquaculture (fish farming)
2. Support school meal programs by purchasing staple foods from local women farmers
3. Train school youth to grow their own food and to maintain fish ponds
4. Implement health interventions (deworming program)
5. Implement nutrition training

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Orphans
Women and girls
At-risk youth

Partnering with women’s communities, we provide seeds and skills to mobilize mothers to grow nutrient dense food for their families. Women sell their excess harvest to pay school fees for their children.
This program:
1. improves nutrition for rural households
2. generates income when excess harvests are sold
3. strengthens community ties

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Parents
Health

Where we work

Awards

Top Ranked Organization 2021

Global Giving

Top Ranked, Efficient and Vetted Organization 2022

Global Giving

Give with Confidence 2022

Charity Navigator

Voted as 1 of 6 charities receiving a grant of a total of 150 charities 2022

University of Texas: Philanthropy Lab

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percent decrease in school infirmary visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of African descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

HOME GROWN SCHOOL MEAL PROGRAMS TO PROMOTE ACCESS TO EDUCATION

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Proper and adequate nutrition impacts children's health. No COVID has been reported at this school. The local infirmary for this metric remains shuttered due to COVID so there is no 2020 data.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of African descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

HOME GROWN SCHOOL MEAL PROGRAMS TO PROMOTE ACCESS TO EDUCATION

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

School meal programs promote school attendance and retention; decrease school dropout rates; and improve children's focus and engagement in school.

Number of community members trained in horticulture best practices

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Women and girls, Parents

Related Program

WOMEN'S COMMUNITY GARDENS FOR FOOD SECURITY AND ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Horticulture trainings improve food security and create revenue generating activity for economic empowerment for women in rural communities. *FY21: 3,000+ women graduated from Community Garden Program

Number of school youth trained in agriculture best practices

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents, People of African descent, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

School youth train in agriculture best practices, learning how to grow their own food and to maintain fishponds. These are marketable skills and improve future self-sufficiency.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We believe that schools in rural Kenya serve as efficient hubs to deliver more than academics. Rural schools benefit their respective communities: children, youth, parents, staff, local leadership, faith leaders, et al. as focused sites for nutrition and health interventions, too.

School meals promote access to education for those less likely to attend school: girls, young women and the most vulnerable. School and community garden programs boost the nutritional value of school meals, while teaching school youth important life skills in growing food for future self-sufficiency. Community members train in horticulture best practices to improve future harvests for feeding their families and for generating some revenue to pay school fees. When school meal inputs are sourced locally from women farmers then: a) local school communities are economically strengthened; b) women gain economically; and c) supply chains are shortened which is climate smart.

School feeding programs increase attendance and enrollment while reducing student dropout rates. Children are able to learn and perform better when they are no longer hungry. Our holistic programs improve the nutrition and health of our partner schools so that children are engaged learners with the capacity to thrive and reach their potential.

SCHOOL MEAL PROGRAMS:
We partner with local community leaders to support school feeding programs with grant funding to primary and secondary schools in rural Kenya. Staple foods are purchased from women farmers. Cooks from the school communities are hired to prepare the meals.

SCHOOL AGRICULTURE PROGRAMS:
We follow a flexible model based upon the capacity of the school. The school communities determine a) what to plant and b) how the harvests will be used. Training in best practices is implemented by our staff and/or school staff. The school garden can also serve as a demonstration plot and/or community garden for the school community. If the school has capacity, we will support additional agriculture programs such as fish ponds, small livestock and beekeeping programs.

WOMEN’S COMMUNITY GARDENS:
Partnering with women’s communities, we provide seeds and skills to mobilize mothers to grow nutrient dense food for their families. Mothers sell their excess harvest to pay school fees for their children.

East African Children’s Fund has 3 staff members in Kenya to implement, and to monitor and evaluate program. We also work closely with a local leader in Meru, Kenya who has 30+ years’ experience in implementing education, food security and economic empowerment programs to serve the most vulnerable. We have relationships with academic leaders in Kenya who specialize in the areas of nutrition and food security. We have consulted with the World Vegetable Center (AVRDC) in Tanzania, and a partner school has participated with the Catholic Relief Services/USAID Farmer to Farmer program.

East African Children's Fund strengthens school communities in rural Kenya with school feeding and farming programs. To date, we’ve provided 3.2 million nutritious school meals to children and youth from rural communities in Kenya who would not otherwise receive a meal during the school day. One partner school identifies an 83% decrease in school infirmary visits since program inception. More specifically, our program outputs and impact are as follows, all of which is made possible by our donors.

2022 OUTPUT AND IMPACT:
COVID, CONFLICT AND CLIMATE, ACCORDING TO UNICEF, ARE CREATING AN UNPRECEDENTED CHALLENGE FOR CHILDREN AND THEIR COMMUNITIES. KENYA IS ONE OF 15 COUNTRIES IDENTIFIED AS THE MOST NEGATIVELY IMPACTED.
AT EAST AFRICAN CHILDREN’S FUND, WE BELIEVE THAT RURAL SCHOOLS SERVE AS EFFICIENT HUBS FOR NOT JUST AN EDUCATION BUT ALSO FOR NUTRITION AND HEALTH INTERVENTIONS. SCHOOL MEALS PROMOTE ACCESS TO EDUCATION AND SERVE AS CENTERS FOR CHILDREN TO RECEIVE HEALTHY MEALS. OUR FOOD SECURITY PROGRAMS ENSURE ACCESS TO A VARIETY OF MICRONUTRIENT DENSE FOODS. PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FROM FY22 INCLUDE:

SCHOOL NUTRITION AND HEALTH:
SCHOOL MEALS: PURCHASED STAPLE FOODS FOR 625,000+ SCHOOL MEALS SERVED TO 600 CHILDREN AND YOUTH, 60% ORPHANED.

SCHOOL HEALTH: 1,000 SCHOOL CHILDREN PARTICIPATED IN A DEWORMING PROGRAM.
SCHOOL FARMING PROGRAMS:

HORTICULTURE:
SCHOOL FARMING PROGRAMS: GREW MORE THAN 17 VARIETIES OF VEGETABLES AND 9 VARIETIES OF FRUITS ACROSS 4 SCHOOL FARMS TO BOOST 2,850 DAILY SCHOOL MEALS AT ST FRANCIS BOYS’ HOME, ST CLARE GIRLS’ CENTRE AND ST PHILOMENA HOMES OF HOPE IN MERU, KENYA.

257 YOUTH TRAINED ON BEST PRACTICES TO GROW THEIR OWN NUTRIENT DENSE FOOD FOR INCREASED SELF-SUFFICIENCY.

CLIMATE SMART IRRIGATION: 1 SOLAR BOREHOLE PUMP INSTALLED FOR ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER AND FOR IRRIGATING FRUIT TREES AND VEGETABLES AT SCHOOL FARM.

AQUACULTURE: 10 SCHOOL FISHPONDS WERE STOCKED AND MAINTAINED TO PROVIDE 950 CHILDREN A FISH MEAL WEEKLY, AS A SOURCE OF ALTERNATE PROTEIN AND OF MICRONUTRIENTS.

SMALL LIVESTOCK: MAINTAINED PIGGERY TO FEED 950 SCHOOL CHILDREN AND EXPANDED PROGRAM WITH RABBIT HUSBANDRY TO SUSTAIN REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE PRACTICES. MAINTAINED CHICKEN PROGRAM PROVIDING EGGS TO 950 SCHOOL CHILDREN.

WOMEN’S COMMUNITY GARDEN PROGRAMS:
GRADUATED 3,000 WOMEN FROM THE PROGRAM WITH IMPROVED SKILLS FOR GROWING FOOD FOR THEIR FAMILIES.
MORE THAN 1,500 WOMEN FROM MERU AND ISIOLO COUNTIES IN RURAL KENYA RECEIVED SEEDS, SKILLS AND SMALL TOOLS TO GROW FOOD AT THEIR HOMES TO SUPPORT AN ADDITIONAL 7,500 CHILDREN.

OUR PROGRAMS CURRENTLY SUPPORT SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS (SDGs): 1,2,3,4,5, 10,15

100% DIRECT GIVING: DONATIONS ARE APPLIED DIRECTLY TO PROGRAMS.

*Additional information is provided in our annual reports.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

EAST AFRICAN CHILDREN'S FUND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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EAST AFRICAN CHILDREN'S FUND

Board of directors
as of 05/16/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Lisa Peracchio

Tara McKinney

Doris Mbabu

Carol Laub

James Mathenge

Kathleen Ninivaggi

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/17/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/17/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.