PLATINUM2024

AIM Youth Mental Health

We envision a world of mentally healthy youth.

aka AIM for Mental Health   |   Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA   |  https://aimymh.org

Learn how to support this organization

Mission

AIM is bridging the gap between research and access to care for youth struggling with their mental health by finding and implementing evidence-based treatments, empowering youth to discover their own mental health solutions, and training caring adults to create safe communities.

Ruling year info

2016

Founder and Board Chair

Susan Stilwell

Executive Director

Judy Smythe

Main address

P.O. Box 4294

Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA 93921 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-3992060

NTEE code info

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

Other Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Grantmaking Foundations N.E.C. (O99)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (H12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Youth mental health is at an all-time low: from 2007 through 2021, suicide rates increased by 62% among youth aged 10 to 24. One in five children has a mental, emotional, or behavioral disorder. But accessible treatment and prevention programs are limited, and many families are left navigating youth mental health challenges without the support they need. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry estimates that only half of children with diagnosable mental health problems receive necessary treatment. AIM Youth Mental Health was founded to address the shortage of mental health resources for children and young people. AIM's programs are based on the conviction that with the right support, young people who are struggling today can become the resilient leaders of tomorrow.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Research

We find and fund the most promising youth mental health research in the world to help kids now. AIM is not disorder or institution-specific, which means that we fund research of the most innovative treatments for all mental disorders in youth, and find the best, cutting-edge research teams and individuals, regardless of where they are based. Through strategic vetting and funding of clinical research to find solutions for mental health challenges, AIM Youth Mental Health is helping kids today.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
At-risk youth

Through our AIM for Awareness Programs, we connect with and empower children, families, educators, mental health practitioners, and mental health researchers. We are raising awareness and empathy and providing resources through our Scientific Symposiums and annual Design Challenge for middle and high school students. We are building a movement with a positive, forward-thinking focus.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Families
Parents
Teachers
Children and youth

AIM Ideas Lab creates safe spaces for teenagers to express themselves and build mentally healthy peer communities. During this eight-week program, high school students learn to design and conduct peer-to-peer mental health surveys, resulting in student-led solutions to the youth mental health crisis.

With support from program mentors, AIM Ideas Lab students design and conduct anonymous, peer-to-peer mental health surveys, analyze their results, and make data-informed recommendations to improve youth mental wellness. Students present and disseminate their findings to parents, teachers, and the wider community, gaining valuable experience with writing and public speaking, while raising awareness about actionable steps to improve youth mental health. Results are available on AIM's website at: https://aimymh.org/aim-ideas-lab/

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Family relationships
Health

AIM's Youth Mental Health First Aid program provides what many young people need the most: the presence of an understanding adult who is educated about mental health. Youth Mental Health First Aid provides mental health training to parents, relatives, and adults who work with young people. In 2023, AIM launched a teen-focused version of the program, which trains teenagers to effectively support their peers. The result is a community of teens and caring adults ready to help students who are dealing with mental illness, substance abuse, or other crises.

Stigma around mental illness leads far too many young people to suffer in silence. Youth Mental Health First Aid combats mental health stigma by empowering community members to initiate hard conversations, identify warning signs for self-harm and suicide, offer strategies for self-help, and encourage professional help when appropriate, with the goal of ensuring that no young person faces mental illness alone.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Organization of the Year 2018

Carmel Chamber of Commerce

Award 2022

Monterey County Chamber of Commerce

Affiliations & memberships

Organization of the Year - Carmel Rotary 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Family relationships

Related Program

Research

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

AIM funded research opens access to clinical mental health care for children, teens and young adults and those who love and care for them.

Number of research studies conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Family relationships, Health, Gender and sexual identity, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Research

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

AIM invests in ground-breaking mental health research studies to treat mental health disorders in youth, such as anxiety, depression, eating disorders, and bipolar disorder.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, Parents, Teachers, Students

Related Program

Youth Mental Health First Aid

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth Mental Health First Aid provides mental health training to parents, teachers, and other adults who work with young people.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

AIM Ideas Lab

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

AIM Ideas Lab empowers high school students to identify mental health solutions through research, peer conversations, and sharing their own ideas and experiences.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AIM Youth Mental Health's goals are to:

1. Improve the quality, consistency, and accessibility of evidence-based treatments that address youth mental health challenges by finding and supporting promising mental health research.
2. Galvanize public support and raise awareness about youth mental health challenges and solutions.
3. Empower young people to express their ideas, experiences, and solutions to the youth mental health crisis.


1. Identify and fund the implementation of evidence-based mental health treatments that alleviate symptoms and save lives.
2. Train caring adults and teens to recognize and respond to youth mental health challenges.
3. Create safe spaces for teenagers discuss mental health, lead peer-to-peer conversations, and raise awareness in their communities.

Since 2014, AIM has engaged leading researchers in advancing evidence-based solutions to the youth mental health crisis. Our Scientific Advisory Board is comprised of a diverse and distinguished group of doctors in the pediatric mental health community, including faculty from major research institutions such as Yale School of Medicine, the University of Oxford, and the Stanford University School of Medicine, among others. The Scientific Advisory Board is featured on AIM's website at: https://aimymh.org/scientific-advisory-board/

To directly serve youth and caring adults, AIM partners with more than 70 schools, universities, and community-based organizations. Our partnerships with youth-focused organizations enable AIM to reach young people at accessible and trusted locations, while raising awareness among caring adults including teachers, parents, and the broader community.

Goal 1. Improve the quality, consistency, and accessibility of evidence-based treatments that address youth mental health challenges by identifying and supporting promising mental health research.

AIM-funded clinical research has a direct impact on at-risk youth and their families. All AIM-funded research is detailed on AIM's website at: https://aimymh.org/mental-health-research/

Past research projects include:
- Anxiety Reduction: AIM-funded research helped achieve significant improvements in behavioral capacity for cognitive control and significant decreases in anxiety symptoms among adolescents.
- Treatment for Eating Disorders: Family intervention delivered along with telehealth treatment resulted in sustained improvements in adolescents' behavioral and cognitive symptoms over time, with improvements continuing after discharge.
- Help for Children on Waitlists for Treatment: Support for parents of children on waitlists for therapy helped children cope with symptoms. Parents benefitted from creating an action plan to support their children.

Goals 2 and 3: Galvanize public support and raise awareness about youth mental health challenges and solutions.
Empower young people to express their ideas, experiences, and solutions to the youth mental health crisis.

- AIM Ideas Lab has engaged more than 2,200 students from 23 high schools in sharing their perspectives on the youth mental health crisis. Results and recommendations from past AIM Ideas Lab cohorts are available on AIM's website at: https://aimymh.org/aim-ideas-lab/
- Youth Mental Health First Aid has trained over 800 parents, teachers, and staff from youth-serving organizations, resulting in increased understanding and support for youth who are struggling.
- AIM's annual Design Challenge provides middle and high school students with the opportunity to creatively express their experiences and perspectives on mental health. Art created by past Design Challenge winners is featured on AIM's website at: https://aimymh.org/design-challenge/

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

AIM Youth Mental Health
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AIM Youth Mental Health

Board of directors
as of 04/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

JD Susan Stilwell

Stilwell Inc.

Jessica Canning

Canning Properties Group

Dean Maynard

The Maynard Group

Paul Roshka, J.D.

Jennings Haug Cunningham

Hon. Stephanie Hulsey

California Superior Court of Monterey County

Lou Pambianco

Startup Sandbox

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/4/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/05/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.