Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy

International Neighbors

Be a Great Neighbor!

aka International Neighbors, INC.

Charlottesville, VA

Mission

Equipping refugees & SIVs with the skills and network needed to thrive- not just to survive- as new Americans.

Ruling Year

2015

Founder & Executive Director

Mrs. Kari Miller

Main Address

224 9th Street SW Suite A

Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA

Keywords

refugee, independence, inclusion, minority, disadvantaged, multicultural, PTSD

EIN

47-4084246

 Number

5118374031

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Immigrants' Rights (R21)

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Health Support Services (E60)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

International Neighbors addresses the problems faced by Charlottesville's local refugee community, particularly those stemming from a lack of language and living in isolation. International Neighbors also addresses the problem faced by natives in our local community, as they are unaware that almost 6% of our city is comprised of resettled refugee neighbors.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

1 2 3 4 8 10 16

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Brighter Beginnings

Health & Wellness

Community Connections

Skills for Success

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Community Connections

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people on the organization's email list

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Community Connections

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of testimonies offered

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Community Connections

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of media partnerships developed

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Community Connections

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

International Neighbors connects closely with refugees and SIVs (Special Immigrant Visa holders, who worked alongside U.S. military during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq) who have been invited by the federal government to begin new lives in Charlottesville, VA. IN is keenly aware of the struggles endured by our newest neighbors, some of whom have chosen suicide or returned to the dangers of their homeland after losing hope in our town. The mission of International Neighbors is to provide our refugee and SIV neighbors with a network of support services, people, and opportunities that fosters progress along their path to independence and productive citizenship. Networks are crucial to success for all human beings, and particularly for these vulnerable individuals who fled danger and persecution, and were forced to leave all prior networks behind.

International Neighbors strives to equip new Americans with tools and opportunities that would otherwise not be attainable. Through grants, private donations, and commitment from volunteers, we offer the following:
-Driving the Dream: the strategy for this program is to assist participants in achieving independent mobility, no longer depending on lengthy and unreliable public transportation. International Neighbors provides professional driving lessons, assists new neighbors in earning driver's licenses, and- when vehicles are donated- automobile ownership.
-Bilingual Buddies: We match a native speaker with an English language learner, for weekly lessons within the home of the learner. This is extremely important as most learners are isolated women at home with small children.
Also, formal English classes offered in town and cost prohibitive or dependent on public transportation, which is subpar.
-Family Friendships: We match a refugee/SIV family with a local family, to serve as friends who help along the path of independence. Often times a weekly visit turns into clarity regarding bills or other important documents that are confusing due to language. International Neighbors offers frequent outings with all Family Friends in conjunction with our community partners.
Kids in Camps/Extracurriculars: Refugee/SIV families work extremely hard, often at multiple jobs, in order to afford the high cost of rent in Charlottesville. They have no extra money to afford their children summer and after school activities that most American children enjoy. This strategy increases the participant's level of language, as well as creating bonds with fellow peers.

International Neighbors is an entirely volunteer led organization. The Board of Directors (eight individuals) is highly involved, as is our Village of Volunteers which consists of 253 people. We are all very hands on, working directly within neighborhoods and with community partners. Passion is what drives each of us, with the mission of social justice for our city's newest neighbors. International Neighbors has committees for each program area, with a Committee Chair that reports to the Board The Chair of each Committee sends weekly updates and is always available by phone. The support of our community has been amazing, with business and other organizations offering supports and partnerships.

Each program offered by International Neighbors has it's own indicators, such as a "no cavity check up" with our Super Smiles program. Much of our documentation is from personal testimony, by volunteers as well as from our clients. When a woman from Syria says, "I had no hope before International Neighbors and now I have so much," we know we are making progress. Another indicator is our growth, which has doubled each year in donations, volunteers, and clients.

International Neighbors has grown tremendously since our launch in 2015. Each year has seen at least double the amount of donations, volunteers, and clients. We have a steady waiting list of people who want to be involved or assisted by IN, but our limited capacity keeps us from being able to train or serve them. In less that three years we have:
-Acquired a Bus (grant funded)
-Acquired Rental Space (grant funded)
-Been Beneficiary of eight Special Events
-Received 12 Donated Vehicles, given to Neighbors
-Offered over 300 Hours of Professional Driving Lessons
-Assisted 49 Adults with Dental Care (as this is not Medicaid Covered)
-Introduced 73 Children to Dental Practice and frequent Dentist Visits
-Advocated to Landlords and Slumlords when neighbors lived in squalor
-Been featured on National Public Radio (https://www.npr.org/2018/03/09/577353905/90-days-to-start-a-new-life-for-refugees-in-the-u-s-what-happens-next)
-And so much more!
We have been Great Neighbors and provided opportunities for many more neighbors to be great as well.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: sms text surveys, electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, case management notes, community meetings/town halls, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: the people we serve, our board, our community partners.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: language barriers.
What significant change resulted from feedback
We implemented a food security program that supports a local farm able to grow food that is culturally appropriate to the clients we serve.

External Reviews

Affiliations & Memberships

Hello Neighbor Network 2019

Financials

International Neighbors

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/23/2020

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability Status
Person without a disability

Race & Ethnicity

Other,Other,Other

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 04/23/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
done
We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
done
We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
done
We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
done
We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.

Policies and processes

done
We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
done
We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
done
We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.