STUDENT GLOBAL AMBASSADOR PROGRAM

Growing Thinkers, Problem-Solvers & Leaders

aka SGAP Leaders   |   Rockville, MD   |  sgapleaders.org

Mission

Student Global Ambassador Program (SGAP Leaders) is a leadership program that empowers our underserved youth (ages 13-18) to take action on real-world problems by using STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) to solve sustainability and social justice challenges. Our in-person or virtual workshops, tours and speaker series provide a vehicle for students to develop college and career readiness skills. Students choose the themes for our program which ranges from climate change, teen suicide and mental wellness, to human trafficking (to name a few). In addition, our workshops challenge students from different schools, regions and countries to think critically around real issues that affect real lives; as a res

Notes from the nonprofit

We established our non-profit status in 2016. During the previous six years, we functioned as a community outreach organization focused on 7th -12th grade students. We received funding from TD Bank Charitable Foundation, Wells Fargo, Constellation Energy E2, FirstEnergy, and Picatinny Arsenal. We have impacted 4,500 students in 78 schools and school districts in MD, VA, NJ, NY and Washington DC.

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Director

Michele Joseph

Main address

15800 Crabbs Branch Way Suite 300

Rockville, MD 20855 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4118138

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Encouragement Project (nationally)

Teens submit letters, drawings, poems and short stories. SGAP Leaders vets, then shares with residents of local nursing homes and assisted living centers who have been isolated or negatively affected by the Pandemic. We have received over a1000 submissions for over 500 teens who have earned 20,000 hours of community service. We brokered relationships with 23 different nursing homes.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Multiracial people
Indigenous peoples
People of African descent
People of Asian descent

One-day engaging workshop where youth creatively grapple with wicked problems. Workshop allows students in mixed-school groups of (4-6) to experience the process of design thinking as a tool to resolve human-centered challenges. The process engages students’ creativity and curiosity as they adopt the design mindset, and connects students with an unique method of interpreting problems. Four workshops per academic year. (40 students per session).

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status

Two-year curriculum which encompasses the THINK DESIGN Workshop & Sustainability Challenge. Curriculum focuses on climate change - energy. Target 9th -10th graders.

Each session weaves in the theme of the 2030 sustainable development goals as defined by the United Nations. Student leaders selected the SGAP theme, develop the objectives, identify the audience and determine how best to convey their message to each group. They also design the day-of-activities and the expected outcome of the student experience. In the process, each student acquires team building skills, leadership skills, and keen presentation skills. Notwithstanding, they also have fun!
Each face to face session includes an interactive component which fosters leadership, team spirit, and community outreach.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

SOAR Incubator Graduate 2021

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We target students (ages 13-18) who reside in underserved communities or attend underserved schools. Our youth population comprises 45% Latinx, and 35% Black, and of our total youth population 60% are girls. Our leadership team and our staff reflect the communities which we serve: Staff and Advisors -75% Women of which 75% Latinx, 15% Mixed Race and 10% Asian; Board - 80% Latinx, 10% White, 10% Black; 90% of our Board of Directors comprise women of color.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our impact reporting is often delayed because we do not have the capacity to collect, summarize, and report the feedback to our funders, board members or our students. We secured a consulting firm (Hilltop Consulting) comprised of undergraduate students from Georgetown University to develop a dashboard and a method to capture the results of our survey in real time so that they can be easily imported into an impact report. In addition, our students shared that would prefer to have a speaker who would engage them actively and who represented an alumni from their school. We did both.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Students feel heard and respected when they see that their ideas and suggestions have been implemented.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

STUDENT GLOBAL AMBASSADOR PROGRAM
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

STUDENT GLOBAL AMBASSADOR PROGRAM

Board of directors
as of 11/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Cyndie Shadow

Campus President, Fortis College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/29/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.