PLATINUM2022

BULAMU HEALTHCARE INTERNATIONAL

We treat the sick and strengthen health systems for the poor

aka Bulamu Healthcare   |   Palo Alto, CA   |  www.bulamuhealthcare.org

Mission

To treat the sick and strengthen health systems serving Africans most in need

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Board Chair

Richard Chandler

President, CEO & Director

Richard Siegler

Main address

1933 Waverley Street

Palo Alto, CA 94301 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4196766

NTEE code info

Hospitals and Primary Medical Care Facilities (E20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The poor in Uganda depend on the existing government network of 3200 public health facilities for their care. While general healthcare is supposed to be free, 30-40% of prescriptions go unfilled due to stockouts of medicines. Patients are expected to pay cash for surgeries, which the poor cannot afford, leading to a backlog of chronic cases that have gone untreated for years (goiters, hernias, etc.) Due to shortages of hospital equipment and inexpensive surgical supplies, operating rooms are dark about 50% of the time, meaning that pregnant women with obstructed labor simply get turned away. The public system does not provide patients with written information about their diagnosis and treatment that they can take home and share with their families. Public facilities generally do not have computers or management information systems for tracking weekly/monthly performance data that would allow managers to take prompt corrective action when necessary to improve patient care.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

General Medicine: Clinical Support Team (CST) Program

Started in June 2020 in response to the pandemic, under this program we send 3-5 licensed Ugandan clinicians selected from our Core Team for 8 weeks to the 4 largest health centers in a local government district to upgrade the level of patient care. Our team brings vital signs equipment, patient treatment forms, PPE, medicines, and surgical supplies. They work side-by-side with local staff, training them on new skills and modelling a higher productivity culture. In 2021, our 10 CST teams provided free healthcare to 56,028 patients at 20 health facilities in 5 districts for a cost of $5.50 per patient.
Success Metrics: Increase in patients treated, cost per patient treated, level of patient satisfaction.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People with diseases and illnesses
Low-income people

We send an SI team of surgeons and support staff with the necessary equipment and supplies to a partner district Health Center IV and provide free surgeries to a backlog of 250-350 cases who have been left behind by the current system for lack of money. For severe cases that need referral to a specialty acute care facility, we cover their transportation and surgery costs under our Angel Program. In 2021, we held 8 SIs that treated 2,194 patients at a cost of $152 per case, while 33 Angel patients cost $453 per case.
Success Metrics: Number of surgeries performed, cost per case.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People with diseases and illnesses
Low-income people

This technology-based hospital/clinic management provides computers to our district partners and collects weekly/monthly data on 57 Key Performance Indicators, which can immediately be downloaded in the form of graphic management reports that allow managers to monitor performance on a real-time basis and take corrective action when necessary. The KPIs address patient care indicators, clinical practices, staff attendance, and clinician productivity. In 2021, the HCE program was installed in 8 partner districts operating 209 government-operated hospitals and clinics. By June 2022 we will be in 11 districts with a total of 315 hospitals and clinics.
Success Metrics: Patients treated, staff attendance (“payroll yield”), clinician productivity (“patient-equivalents treated per week”), staff training classes, public outreach events.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Low-income people
People of African descent

In 2021, we introduced a vertical focus on MCH, where we believe we can have a significant and cost-effective impact. Building on our established district partnerships, our CSTs first raised the MCH Standard of Care, bringing with them needed skills and supplies. The HCE program now includes these five MCH elements: (a) The Emergency Transport for women with obstructed labor to get an emergency C-section; (b) Essential Surgical Supplies, so that operating rooms are never shut down for lack of supplies; (c) MCH Patient Forms, which give mothers access to their own health data; (d) Surgical Equipment to make sure the operating rooms are functional and can perform C-sections; (e) Clinical Training on standard WHO curricula such as Helping Babies Breathe (HBB). In 2021, our MCH programs helped 6,061 patients give birth safely, including 505 C-sections.
Success Metrics: Number of natural deliveries, C-sections, maternal mortality, perinatal mortality, births with a skilled attendant.

Population(s) Served
Women
Girls
Children
Pregnant people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

USD

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our short-term goal is to improve healthcare for the poor in Uganda by mobilizing local licensed clinicians operating out of existing public facilities who demonstrate what is possible when the proper skills, support, and motivation are combined with an energized, high-productivity culture. Our longer-term goal is to improve healthcare for the poor more broadly by strengthening the public healthcare system in Uganda, and eventually throughout sub-Saharan Africa, through the adoption of a modern, fact-based management system that drives continuous improvement and ultimately gets incorporated into the government’s standard healthcare model.

Bulamu is pursuing six basic strategies to achieve its mission and goals:
(1) Establish formal partnerships (MOUs) with local government districts and build trust through a free exchange of services, whereby our Clinical Support Teams demonstrate improved clinical practices with measurable attendance and productivity benefits, while the district provides access to their managers, facilities, and patients.
(2) Through our Surgical Intensive and Angel Programs that provide free surgical care, clear the district’s backlog demand from chronic sufferers, demonstrating to district constituencies what is possible with the right organizational skills, equipment and supplies, and energized culture.
(3) Install the HCE management system to raise the standard of care across all partner district facilities, while also improving patient satisfaction, reducing staff absenteeism, increasing clinician productivity, and fostering a culture of accountability.
(4) Demonstrate to the Ministry of Health through Monitoring & Evaluation documentation that our innovative, cost-effective solutions, currently being introduced to 10% of all public facilities in Uganda, can be incorporated into their standard health unit operating model, extended nationally, and will positively impact patient care wherever it is introduced.
(5) Advocate policy change for fixing the government’s broken National Medical Stores distribution system, which delivers to health units only once every 2 months (for 90% of facilities with a fixed “kit” of medications and supplies set a year in advance,) by conducting a randomly controlled, IRB and MOH approved research project on stockouts of Essential Medicines & Health Supplies (UMHS) that will document and publicize nationally the egregious failures in the current system.
(6) Extend the HCE system to other African countries, showing that an integrated package of common sense, business-oriented solutions can be applied to the public healthcare sector using local personnel and systems and will deliver improved, more cost-effective healthcare for the poor.

We have five organizational strengths that we believe set us apart from other healthcare NGOs:
(1) A proven product line of innovative healthcare service delivery models, as described above, that have achieve remarkably cost-effective results across the 20 different government districts where our programs have been conducted since 2016.
(2) Our superb Ugandan team of 10 full-time staff and 80 part-time Core Team of licensed clinicians who operate with exceptional professionalism and dedication while implementing the steady flow of new programs that keep extending our patient impact.
(3) The Bulamu Health Center Excellence (HCE) Program, with its unique intellectual property (IP) in the form of the HCE-IT management system, PC installation software, data warehouse, suite of Tableau.com graphic reports, 126-page HCE Program Manual, and related processes and procedures.
(4) The Bulamu Healthcare International brand that has earned respect within the Ministry of Health and other government departments, across our network local government district partnerships, with our professional hospital referral relationships for severe cases, and among the poor in Uganda who flock to our events based on the word-of-mouth reputation that precedes us.
(5) Our governance structure, consisting of these key components:
a) US-based team of 3 corporate officers;
b)12-member Board of Directors composed of seasoned executives, physicians, and other professionals with relevant domain experience;
c) Bulamu Advisory Council with 24 members, all of whom have strong extensive experience with NGOs in Africa, including 17 doctors, 4 public health professionals, and 14 Africans.
Together, this leadership team has provided steady guidance throughout Bulamu’s consistent, upward trajectory since its founding in 2016.

• By June 2022 the HCE program will be installed in 11 districts with 315 hospitals and clinics treating 3.2 million patients per year.
• Since our founding in 2016, Bulamu has provided free medical care to a total of 275,511 patients and free surgeries to 10,161 patients.
• In 2021, 56,028 patients got treatment through Bulamu’s Clinical Support Teams, and 5,193 patients got treated or supported through our surgery programs.
• Bulamu has established strong relationships with senior officials in the Uganda MOH, who have provided written endorsements of our programs and are waiting to see if they can be successfully scaled to operate across their network of 3200 public health units.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Adults and children in Africa People with illnesses or health concerns Maternal and Child Health patients Clinicians and healthcare workers Health leaders

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

BULAMU HEALTHCARE INTERNATIONAL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

BULAMU HEALTHCARE INTERNATIONAL

Board of directors
as of 04/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Richard Chandler

Richard Chandler, MBA

Richard Siegler

John Schniedwind

Ronald Ariagno

Andrew Griffin

Robert King Jr

Volker Kuebler

Patrick Kyamanywa

Bonnie Ng

Elena Patterson

Christine Russel

Chuck Sheldon

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/03/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.