Boston Music Project

Playing with Purpose

aka Josiah Quincy Orchestra Program   |   Boston, MA   |  www.bostonmusicproject.org

Mission

The mission of Boston Music Project is to ensure the long-term social and musical success of our students, and to positively impact them, their families, and the community through quality music education and performance.

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Director

Mr. Christopher Schroeder

Main address

P. O. Box 180772

Boston, MA 02118 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Josiah Quincy Orchestra Program

EIN

47-4232704

NTEE code info

Music (A68)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Young people in Boston face a myriad of economic, social, technological, and environmental challenges which often affects their chances for long-term success. Our school system, and city, remains one of the most racially and socioeconomically segregated in the nation. Overcrowded classrooms, continued cuts in education, especially in the arts, have left too many young people without what they need to succeed. As part of a strategy to close these gaps in achievement and educational opportunity, BMP works alongside Boston Public Schools to bring our programming to students. Evidence shows that the arts, and the skills gained through the arts, are precursors to success in other aspects of a student’s life. Students who participate in the arts show both short-term and long-term benefits such as performing better in and staying in school; attending and thriving in college; obtaining a good job and career path; and staying politically and civically engaged.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Boston Music Project

The Boston Music Project (BMP) provides creative youth development programming to underserved youth ages four-19 in Boston, Massachusetts. Our mission is to ensure the long-term social and musical success of our students, and to positively impact our youth and their families through quality music education and performance. We have been in operation since 2011, and today, BMP annually serves over 230 students (Pre-K - 12th grade) and presents over 30 public/virtual performances around Boston. Additionally, we employ a diverse team of 26 teaching artists and seven collegiate teaching and administrative interns.

At BMP, youth don’t just learn how to play the viola, violin, cello, double bass, or piano, we seek to unleash a child's creative spirit, increase their self-confidence, and nurture their social-emotional growth. We are a recognized leader in Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) and special education programming and serve as a SEL and Wellness portfolio partner with Boston Public Schools.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
Social and economic status
Families
Caregivers

To further its mission of inclusivity, in 2017, BMP launched the Beethoven Ensemble for Children with Special Needs. Our goal has been to create a music program that meets the individual needs of the students while improving their musical and social-development opportunities.

The structure of the Beethoven Ensemble was carefully designed in consultation with individuals at our host school, the Josiah Quincy Elementary School (JQES). BMP worked with JQES music teacher, special education teachers, and Principal Soo Hoo to create this program. Classes are also capped with the number of students not exceeding 15 for Learning Disabled classes and 10 for Physically Handicapped classes. The Beethoven Ensemble curriculum and schedule ensure a sequential learning opportunity .

Our curriculum focuses on singing, rhythmic development, movement, and instrumental performance (hand bells and boomwhackers). Lessons on social-emotional skills are also incorporated, such as exercises on patience, kindness, and leadership. In addition to in class work, BMP uses performance opportunities to help children develop confidence and self-worth. Beethoven Ensemble students perform at all JQES in-school performances in December and June.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of entities served by expertise

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Social and economic status, Ethnic and racial groups, Health

Related Program

Beethoven Ensemble

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We work to serve 50-60 youth. Each special education class is taught separately, with the number of students not exceeding 15 for Learning Disabled classes and 10 for Physically Handicapped classes.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

BMP’s vision is to give every child an engaging and fun musical experience, performance opportunities to develop confidence and self-efficacy, high levels of musical proficiency, and a passion for learning that transcends all subjects. We aim to see youth develop the following:

Musical Proficiency: All youth take part in weekly music programming and community performances to master their instrument.

Social-Emotional Skills: Our curriculum is designed to help students develop the self-awareness, self-control, and interpersonal skills that are vital for school, work, and life success.

Civic Engagement: Our work within the community gives students context for how they can make a positive impact. Students begin to understand the importance of community engagement and the positive role that they can play in their communities.

Creative Self-Expression: In addition to instrumental music instruction, students take part in a series of creative projects to help them develop and amplify their own unique voice.

Since its founding, BMP has provided Boston youth a combination of high-quality music education and opportunities for social-emotional development. Currently, BMP offers before, during, and after school programming to 230 youth at four BPS sites.

Within our programs, students are organized by age and musical ability which allows us to challenge and support youth through all of their developmental stages. Musicians participate in different performances, lessons, orchestras, ensembles, and instrument sectionals to master their viola, violin, cello, double bass, or piano. Students engage in collaborative music-making activities and study advanced topics such as improvisation and composition. As a student progresses through our programs, they gain a foundation in digital music composition, recording and production, peer mentorship and civic leadership.

Our curriculum is specifically tailored to help youth advance their musical abilities as well as develop executive function skills and social-emotional skills necessary to succeed at school and in life. Our program’s intensity, breadth, and duration is greater than local competitors. Currently, our average student teacher ratio is one to six and students receive, on average, three-and-a-half hours of small group/private lessons per week. Moreover, while our final outputs are performance-based, our teaching practices are focused on youth’s social-emotional development. At BMP, youth find a consistent and safe place to be seen and heard and become more confident individuals with powerful voices.

BMP has served the Boston community for roughly 10 years. Born from the desire to bring daily, high-quality music education and SEL support to our city's most vulnerable youth, BMP initially began in partnership with Boston Public School (BPS) in 2011. In 2015, BMP acquired its official 501c3 nonprofit status, separating its budget and operations from BPS. As part of a strategy to close gaps in achievement and educational opportunity, BMP continues to work directly with BPS as a Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) and Wellness portfolio partner.

BMP has an exceptional team of faculty and staff with a diverse background of teaching and performance experiences. Each team member is committed to ensuring not just the musical development of students, but also their social/emotional growth and well-being. BMP hires teaching artists who are capable and eager to grow within their own practice. All teachers attend a pre-program orientation and professional development workshops throughout the year. This attentiveness to development and growth ensures that they have the tools to grow together as a team and learn from each other.

Our success and ambition has not gone unnoticed. In 2019, we received an official resolution from the City of Boston for our efforts to support BPS. BMP has also won national acclaim, receiving the “Best Community for Music Education” award from the National Association for Music Merchants in both 2019 and 2020.

Our success and ambition has not gone unnoticed. In 2019, we received an official resolution from the City of Boston for our efforts to support BPS. BMP has also won national acclaim, receiving the “Best Community for Music Education” award from the National Association for Music Merchants in both 2019 and 2020.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Boston Music Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Boston Music Project

Board of directors
as of 6/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Karen Euler

Michael Campbell

Community Volunteer

Cynthia Soo Hoo

Josiah Quincy Elementary School

Maren Peterson

Year Up

Graciela Briceno

The World Ensemble

Gwenn Fairall

Boston University

Beth Harper

Boston Children's Hospital

Andrew Schneller

Liberty Mutual Insurance

Christopher Schroeder

Boston Music Project

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data