The Women's Bakery

Social Enterprise, based on a loaf of bread.

aka The Women's Bakery   |   Denver, CO   |  www.womensbakery.com

Mission

The Women's Bakery (TWB) is a social enterprise that gainfully employs women and provides access to nutritious, affordable breads in East Africa. We socially and economically empower women, improve community access to nutrition, and spark economic growth - all through local business.

Ruling year info

2015

Founder | CEO

Ms. Markey Culver

Main address

1031 33rd Street Suite 243

Denver, CO 80205 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Rwanda Women's Bakery

EIN

47-4333365

NTEE code info

Single Organization Support (W11)

Vocational Technical (B30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Globally, women lack access to education, sustainable/gainful employment, and opportunities for improved heath. 57% of Rwanda's adult females never had the option of going to school. The majority of Rwanda's adult females are not paid for their work. 40% of Rwanda's children are chronically malnourished. Typically, at the start of TWB training, not even 1% of women trainees have a regular income, and of their income reported, average just $13/month. Trainees average 6 years of formal education and only 45% have health insurance. After TWB’s training program, women earn a certificate of vocational education, earn sustainable gainful income, and 100% hold health insurance plans for themselves and their families. Through their participation as a strong woman baking bread, women are employed in their communities, run bakeries that support their communities, source ingredients from their communities, and sell nutritious affordable breads to their communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Whole Woman Programming

By first providing comprehensive business education and vocational training, The Women’s Bakery (TWB) trains women to launch and profitably manage nutrition-centric bakeries in their communities. Our mission serves to empower women, improve community access to nutrition, and spark economic growth – all through local business creation.

TWB’s specially tailored training program is 200 hours of theoretical and practical education modules. Trainings are delivered in the local language and bakery infrastructure is built during training. These bakeries are built in urban, peri-urban and/or rural communities and designed to meet local demand with local supply. Ingredients for our breads are sourced from each bakery’s community, thereby sparking and sustaining local economies.

All of our bakeries are given the tools and management support to become operationally profitable in 18-24 months. Our bakeries specialize in producing / selling highly nutritious breads that are affordably priced to grant lower-income families purchasing power.

Since 2015, we've launched four bakeries in East Africa, and trained three more.

Our Whole Woman Programming expands programming for strong women baking bread beyond initial training. Our programming derives directly from the women themselves, and we do our best to meet their evolving needs. Since 2015, we have added monthly mental health counseling and health insurance for every woman and her family. In 2019, we offered gender equity training for bakers and their spouses, and built on-site daycare for working mothers.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average change in income of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Whole Woman Programming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Whole Woman Programming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Whole Woman Programming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average wage of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Whole Woman Programming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients receiving health care benefits as part of wage package

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Whole Woman Programming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

TWB’s vision is to advance women’s autonomy, improve community health, and generate socio-economic opportunity. Through education, TWB imparts irrevocable skills that are capacity building and income generating.

TWB seeks to create a business model that challenges how the world views philanthropy and development. This model is at the forefront of international development; instead of inputting resources without training or informed research, community growth can be enhanced by investing in local businesses which benefit the community directly.

Our vision is big. We want to become the #1 women-powered bakery branch / franchise network in East Africa. We presently own three bakeries in Rwanda and one franchise bakery in Uganda, and the quantitative and qualitative data that shows our programs are working.

TWB's model is a “simple" solution to complex problems. Inputs for bread are available almost anywhere - local ovens, by-hand methods, and local ingredients can be uniquely combined to bake bread. What is lacking is innovation and business acumen.
TWB's model is a comprehensive training & business creation program. It is a women-centric, three-phased vocational program that begins with basic pedagogy, hones business acumen, & culminates w bakery operations. It equips undereducated women with skills to manage bakeries in their communities.

Through vocational business education, TWB equips women with skills necessary to launch & profitably manage bakeries. TWB's specially tailored training module is 200+ hours of theoretical & practical education. Women learn to source local ingredients to produce & sell nutritious, affordable breads in their communities - meeting local demand with local supply. Trainings are delivered in the local language & bakery infrastructure is built during training. TWB Bakery Operations Managers (BOMs) provide full-time operational support for 12 months after bakery launch.

Our competitive advantage over other training/job readiness programs is two-fold: 1) The TWB model creates immediate employment opportunities - graduates gain not only relevant skills, but also job opportunities; 2) The TWB model allow a system for community development - by sourcing, selling, and employing locally, each bakery supports and sustains local economic and social development.

TWB's Senior Management Team is made up of hardworking, gritty, and passionate women working to educate and empower women. The Senior Management team includes TWB's Founder and CEO, Markey Culver; Development Director, Madeleine Binsfrahm; Reba Yount, Director of Business Management; and Liz Atwood, Development and Communications Associate. The core team of founders has over 15 collective years of experience working in East Africa, working specifically in social enterprises, nutrition programming, education, and women's leadership development. The Core Management team also has extensive skills in foreign language, project development and management, grant and proposal writing, operations management, financial planning, marketing and performance metrics.

CEO Markey is an MBA graduate of Olin's Business School at Washington University. She is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer from Rwanda. Markey directs the entire leadership and management team in the U.S. and Rwanda. She oversees fundraising, operations, manages personnel, implements strategic partnerships in the US and abroad, and manages business development initiatives. TWB currently maintains a full-time staff of 51 people, majority based in Rwanda. Our Rwandan team executes incredible delivery of our training and business oversight programs. We also support growing part-time, volunteer, and intern members on our team.

57% of Rwanda's adult females never had the option of going to school. The majority of Rwanda's adult females are not paid for their work. 40% of Rwanda's children are chronically malnourished. The average woman in a TWB training is 31 years old and has 3.9 children. 40% of these women rely on farming as a primary source of income and 50% live in female-led homes. Pre-training, 78.6% of these women reported living on less than $200 annually.

Since 2015, TWB has graduated 80 women and has launched 6 bakeries in 2 countries. 1 bakery creates 6-10 jobs and all women double their pre-training immediately upon employment. At our newly launched bakeries, women earn, on average, $1,200 annually. This is a 600-800% income increase. With increased income, women can (and are twice as likely to) invest in their family’s education, health insurance, & improved nutrition. All women (100%) working at our TWB bakeries have received a (soon-to-be nationally accredited) vocational education certificate and hold family health insurance plans. What’s more, TWB hires select women from our bakeries as visiting trainers at our new bakery trainings – our TWB bakery women are training future TWB bakery women.

Collectively, our network of 3 bakeries in Rwanda employs 51 total staff, 47 of which comprise the Rwandan bakery and management team. 450+ elementary school children have access to nutritious bread every school day. 1 piece of TWB bread has 7g of protein – 39% of a child’s daily need. Breads are extremely affordable and sell for $0.12. And 3,500 people in Rwanda consume protein and nutrient packed bread daily. That’s over 1,200,000 units of nutritional bread consumed annually.

TWB’s model is globally relevant: access to vocational training & sustainable, gainful employment for women can be applied anywhere. Bakeries alone may not be innovative, but our process is.

Financials

The Women's Bakery
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Women's Bakery

Board of directors
as of 4/29/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Markey Culver

The Women's Bakery

Term: 2015 -

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No