The Landing

No matter where you are, we will meet you on your journey.

Houston, TX   |  www.thelanding.org

Mission

Our mission is to serve survivors of human trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation with a trauma-informed approach fueled by the love of Christ.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Cara Parker

Main address

9894 Bissonnet Street Suite 605

Houston, TX 77036 USA

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Formerly known as

Sojourn Landing

EIN

47-4507618

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Department of Justice declared Houston one of the most intense jurisdictions for human trafficking in the nation. According to the Polaris Project, also known as The National Human Trafficking Hotline, Houston was the city with the most calls to the hotline over the course of 2007-2016. In 2016, the University of Texas released a research study estimating over 79,000 minor and youth victims of sex trafficking in the state of Texas alone. Although the number of estimated victims is extremely large, it is also estimated that less than 2% of victims are currently identified. Therefore, one of the main barriers in serving victims of human trafficking is the reality that victims are unidentified and underserved. Many victims are falling through the gaps because a vast majority of trauma-informed, specialized services are not directly accessible to victims.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Drop-In Center

The Landing operates a drop-in center, an evidence-based model which offers a nonjudgmental, safe space where victims of human trafficking and sexual exploitation can start the long-term restoration process, recover from trauma, and escape exploitation. Only one percent (1%) of victims are identified, which affects the treatment and services they receive from law enforcement, legal, health, and benefits systems. The drop-in center fills this critical gap in identifying victims of human trafficking. Survivors of human trafficking have been repeatedly traumatized, often over long periods of time, so being identified as a victim is critical because law enforcement, legal, health, and public benefits systems rely less on punishment and begin to offer more services to assist so victims can redirect their lives and heal from trauma. Drop-in services include: Essential Support Services, such as food, a place to rest/sleep, and access to clean clothes; Victim Identification through trust-based relationships and an effective, reliable validated screening tool for trafficking victimization; Case Management designed to help victims identify and achieve their goals by addressing the physical, psychological, and social needs to help escape trafficking and exploitation and move toward self-sufficiency and wellness; Individual Counseling, Support Groups, and Peer Support are available as each participant’s path to self-sufficiency and stability and need for formal and informal supports is unique, so case managers and counselors support are used in varying degrees based on individual preference.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Sex workers

The Landing’s Youth Advocacy program provides individualized holistic 24/7 crisis response and ongoing trust-based support to children and youth victims of human trafficking. Advocates respond 24/7 when youth are in crisis and walk alongside them throughout the recovery process. Advocates provide emotional support, assist youth in navigating community programs and services, and ensure that their voices are heard.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Victims and oppressed people
Sex workers

With the goal of increasing victim identification and connecting survivors with services, The Landing engages in various outreach efforts including street outreach, online outreach, court advocacy, community outreach, and local business outreach.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Sex workers

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Landing currently has 4 main goals that support our overall mission:

1) Increase Identification - The Landing focuses on increasing victim identification through various outreach and intervention techniques in order to connect with victims and provide the support they need.

2) Empower Survivors - Our desire is to empower survivors on their journey. We do this by working with each client to build an individualized action plan to accomplish personal goals. Case managers and survivors work together to develop small action steps and create safety plans to increase the chances of success.

3) Engage Communities - As an organization, The Landing cannot fight human trafficking alone. By engaging communities to join the fight, our goal of serving survivors is exponentially increased. We provide awareness presentations, attend events, conduct outreach to local businesses, and initiate partnerships with churches, law enforcement, service providers, and more! Together we can accomplish much more.

4) Influence Culture - We see human trafficking as a human rights violation, public health crisis, and issue of the heart. Our current culture often helps perpetuate the evil of trafficking, so we believe our culture needs to be positively influenced and changed. This is done through advocating for various laws that will help in the fight against trafficking, as well as helping expose the negative influences that currently exist. We see a need to help accurately educate much of our culture on the topic of human trafficking in order to help change perspectives on demand, victimization, and more.

Our strategies for accomplishing these goals are as follows:

1) Increase Identification - street outreach & intervention, online outreach, continued collaboration with law enforcement, continued and new partnerships with service providers who also serve our population, increased marketing to potential clients & the community as a whole

2) Empower Survivors - continued intensive case management, counseling, the Empowerment Program, the Mentorship Program, classes offered at the drop-in center

3) Engage Communities - awareness presentation to the community, events, partnerships with churches, service projects for volunteers and community groups to get involved, social media

4) Influence Culture - advocating for legislation that has an impact on the human trafficking field, educating professionals about human trafficking, initiating conversations with people in power about the topic and positively influencing perspectives

The Landing has been providing services through the drop-in center for five years on a nationally known hotspot or “track” for prostitution and human trafficking – the Bissonnet Corridor in Southwest Houston. The Landing has served over 700 survivors of human trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation. We believe our growth is due to an increase of outreach to potential victims, current clients spreading the word to other victims, and collaboration with outside organizations. Individuals have been referred to us through The City of Houston’s Anti-Trafficking Office, Ben Taub Hospital, Bee Busy, The Houston Police Department, The Harris County Sheriff’s Office, and The District Attorney’s Office.

We are confident that the drop-in center model is successful in identifying and serving victims. The strength of the quality and professional services we offer at the drop-in center lies in the experienced staff and strong partnerships. We have visited over 15 similar drop-in centers around the United States and even one in Australia to learn about their set up, best practices, and failures. This gave us varying perspectives on how to approach the drop-in center model. Our staff has attended numerous conferences and trainings to network with other anti-trafficking leaders to learn how to better serve victims, even though we believe each staff member is well-educated and experienced to effectively serve survivors.

The Landing opened the first and only drop-in center for survivors of human trafficking in Houston. In the past five years of operation, we have served over 700 survivors of human trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation.

In 2020 The Landing also launched a Youth Advocacy program to address the need for increased services for minor and youth victims of trafficking in Houston. We provide 24/7 crisis response to youth in crisis throughout Harris and the surrounding counties.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

The Landing
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Landing

Board of directors
as of 9/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Natasha Paradeshi

Deborah Gates

James Gates

Natasha Paradeshi

Christopher Kwan

Erin Johnson

Sarah Simmons

Irene Lawder

Jessica Ballew

Cara Parker

The Landing

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/30/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.