PLATINUM2024

Human Trafficking Institute Inc.

Combating slavery at its source by empowering justice systems to stop traffickers

Dallas, TX   |  www.traffickinginstitute.org

Mission

The Human Trafficking Institute exists to decimate modern slavery at its source by empowering police and prosecutors to stop traffickers. Working inside criminal justice systems, HTI provides the embedded experts, world-class training, investigative resources, and evidence-based research necessary to free victims.

Ruling year info

2017

CEO

Victor Boutros

Main address

8035 East RL Thornton FWY Suite 235-1024

Dallas, TX 75228 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4573685

NTEE code info

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (I05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the most recent estimate from the International Labour Organization, there are approximately 24.9 million human trafficking victims in the world today. Traffickers force people into labor or sexual exploitation, seize their earnings, and pay them little or no wages. Even though every country in the world has laws against this form of exploitation, traffickers still manage to bring in $150 billion in annual profits–that’s more than Apple, Microsoft, and Berkshire Hathaway combined- helping make trafficking the fastest-growing criminal enterprise in the world. Traffickers rake in profits, operating under a sense of impunity due to limited criminal justice enforcement, all while exploiting some of the most vulnerable populations and facing no serious repercussions. Our model fills this gap to stop traffickers from exploiting potential victims in the first place.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Uganda Country Program

With an estimated refugee population of 1.4 million in Uganda, traffickers have taken advantage of the crisis situation. According to Platform for the Needy, Uganda has the largest youth population in the world; 60% of Uganda’s population are minors, and 15% of whom are orphans. According to the Trafficking in Persons Report, it is estimated that traffickers are currently exploiting 7,000 to 12,000 children through sex trafficking in Uganda. HTI works with the Justice Department to improve trafficking convictions in countries with sanctions due to their large numbers of human trafficking. We partner with countries serious about measurably improving human trafficking enforcement but lack access to the model or the specialized expertise to do so. We implement our model in coordination with our Partner Countries’ governments over an extended period of time until the model is self-sustaining and the justice system is fully equipped to stop traffickers.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Non-adult children
Families
Men and boys
Women and girls

Since 2017, HTI has partnered with the Belizean government to ensure investigators, prosecutors, and social service workers are prepared to move human trafficking cases through the court system efficiently. After HTI completed the federally funded Central American Regional Security Initiative (CARSI) 1.0 grant, Belize received a Tier 2 upgrade in the annual Trafficking in Persons Report (TIP) issued by the U.S. Department of State in July of 2022. The TIP upgrade from the Tier 3 Watch List took Belize off the United States sanctions list and has created an opportunity for the country to engage in globalization with the private sector allowing for a more stable economy and financial security for Belizeans. As HTI enters phase two of our proven 3-part model in Belize, we are collaborating with other government and non-government agencies to create sustainable, long-term solutions to trafficking in Belize.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Immigrants and migrants

In 2021, the US Human Trafficking Hotline received 50,123 tips and engaged with 13,277 victims or survivors of human trafficking.

HTI works with prosecutors and law enforcement nationwide to build specialized units of police and prosecutors. Alongside conducting capacity-building to equip them with the skills, tactics, and tools they need to be effective. The problem is, if we don’t also invest in efforts to stop the traffickers, we end up in an endless cycle of devastation where more traffickers exploit more victims who need more survivor care. HTI seeks to move upstream and not just deal with the tragic consequences of trafficking after-the-fact but stop it at its source: the trafficker. HTI has developed and implemented evidence-based specialized training for prosecutors, law enforcement, and front-line first responders, providing tools to conduct an investigation, while focusing on victim identification.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders
Domestic workers

Trafficking in persons (TIP) is prevalent across South Africa, and the country is a regional and global hub and destination for both domestic and foreign victims from Africa, Europe, and Asia, specifically Thailand and Indonesia. According to the Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC), trafficking in South Africa disproportionally affects women, and the majority of victims are adults in forced labor or sexual exploitation situations. Issues of widespread gender-based violence and cultural practices of child marriage often overlap with trafficking offenses but remain largely unrecognized as such. TIP in South Africa is also intertwined with organized criminal networks, government complicity, and corruption throughout the region, adding to the complexity of investigations and highlighting the need for greater focus on law enforcement capacity. HTI launched our program in South Africa in June 2023.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of individuals who have been arrested that are successfully prosecuted and 'appropriately' sentenced

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Human trafficking perpetrators convicted

Total number of arrests across clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Traffickers arrested thanks to the work of our Country Programs

Number of stakeholders/stakeholder groups identified

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Victims removed from exploitation

Human trafficking Trafficking In Person's Cases Filed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals applying skills learned through the organization's training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of Country, Judicial or Government Trained Personnel Trained

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Human trafficking is not a naturally occurring phenomenon. It is a choice made by traffickers. The core difficulty in combating trafficking is stopping traffickers in their tracks. While other interventions may reduce vulnerability to trafficking, traffickers need to be prevented from causing more harm. When traffickers are cut off from exploiting more people, those potential victims are no longer targets. Ending trafficking around the world may seem like a daunting task, but stopping an individual trafficker is doable.

Each trafficker stopped sends a message to other traffickers that their crime is not worth the risk, initiating a ripple effect of deterrence. We empower justice systems to stop individual traffickers so that other interventions, like poverty alleviation and victim services, can be more effective.

The Human Trafficking Institute combats trafficking at its source by empowering justice systems to stop traffickers. When justice systems have the tools and training to effectively stop traffickers, they protect the vulnerable and prevent potential victims from being trafficked in the first place.

We implement a proven 3-part model designed to decimate trafficking at its source by stopping traffickers and preventing them from exploiting more victims. Our model helps justice systems more effectively prosecute traffickers, allowing cases to run more smoothly through the pipeline from investigation to trial. Our programs provide prosecutors, law enforcement officers, and social workers with the tools and expertise to decimate trafficking in their home country.

Our model includes:

Specialized Teams
We help our Partner Countries build specialized anti-trafficking teams of police, prosecutors, and victim specialists. We train these teams on specialized investigative and prosecutorial techniques to arrest and charge suspected traffickers. We work with our Partner Countries to fast-track trafficking cases through the courts to prevent excessive backlogs.


Targeted Trainings
Members of the specialized anti-trafficking teams complete a robust training program, comprised of our intensive Human Trafficking Academy and targeted trainings, designed to improve investigative techniques centered on victim needs. Our experts, law enforcement specialists, and victim service professionals provide hands-on training and real-time guidance as they investigate and prosecute cases in the field. Each training program is crafted with input from agencies that handle trafficking cases so as to properly address each Partner Country’s needs and challenges.


Embedded Experts
In cooperation with our Partner Countries, we place enforcement experts inside prosecutors’ offices and police departments. These experts are accomplished prosecutors and law enforcement officers with extensive experience working on human trafficking cases in the United States and abroad. Our experts help support prosecutors and investigators as they pursue trafficking cases, from the identification of victims to the end of a trial. They work side by side with the specialized teams to build skills, solve trafficking case-related challenges, and provide accountability to prevent corruption long after we are gone.

HTI’s approach for decimating human trafficking is based on a model successfully piloted by our co-founders during their tenure at the U.S. Department of Justice. The pilot increased the number of traffickers charged in 6 target districts by 114% and convicted more traffickers than all of the other 88 federal districts combined in just two years. Our programs now bring this model and other best practices for combating human trafficking to our Partner Countries that are serious about measurably improving their trafficking response. Prosecuting human trafficking cases requires intensive training from experienced experts to develop specialized skills and mastery of core knowledge. We embed our experts within the justice systems of our Partner Countries to provide hands on support and intensive training so prosecutors and investigators can effectively combat trafficking. We implement our programs in coordination with our Partner Countries’ governments over an extended period of time until the prevalence of trafficking drops, the model is self-sustaining, and the justice system is fully equipped to stop traffickers for the long run.

HTI’s programming team includes former federal prosecutors from the U.S. Justice Department’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit, the former heads of the U.S. Department of State Diplomatic Security Service’s anti-trafficking work and Homeland Security’s Victim Services, as well as experienced practitioners who have worked within government agencies in Latin America, Australia, and East Africa. HTI’s team is comprised of professionals with significant subject matter expertise in prosecution-focused human trafficking programs and collaborates closely across our global teams and with government partners to share knowledge and bolster justice system responses to trafficking around the world.

HTI currently partners with the governments of Uganda, South Africa, and Belize to enhance their anti-trafficking efforts.

HTIs team on the ground in Uganda includes experienced lawyers who provide daily technical assistance to prosecutors handling human trafficking cases, a victim assistance expert to connect survivors with proper care and rehabilitation support, and a case coordination expert that tracks human trafficking case data and fosters shared learning to help inform and improve the response to human trafficking. In addition to providing daily guidance, training, and resources, the team supported Ugandas Criminal Investigations Directorate in successfully establishing a specialized anti-trafficking unit of 250 officers that is dedicated to solely handling trafficking cases.

Likewise, in partnership with HTI, the Government of Belize designated a specialized judge to handle all TIP cases and established a specialized Anti-Trafficking in Persons Police Unit (ATIPS). HTIs team on the ground includes subject matter experts in law enforcement, victim assistance, and interagency coordination who provide mentoring, training, and tools to support the collaborative justice system response to trafficking.

In addition to capacity-building efforts in our Partner Countries, The HumanTrafficking Institute engages in research, advocacy, and Thought Leadership in the United States to help inform and improve our own justice system response to trafficking. HTI Thought Leadership team publishes data-based scholarship and develops practical resources for those investigating and prosecuting human trafficking with the goal of becoming a credible, leading source for scholars and empowering the next generation of anti-trafficking leaders. Their focus is domestic, and they provide tools and resources across the United States to help decimate trafficking.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Human Trafficking Institute Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Human Trafficking Institute Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/14/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Eric Ha

International Justice Mission

Term: 2020 -

Lenny Moon

FlyCoin

Joe Armes

SW Industrials, Inc.

Stewart Bertron

Bertron LLC

Victor Boutros

Human Trafficking Institute

Caroline Stevens

MPK Equity Partners

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/26/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Middle Eastern/North African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/14/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.