Southern Reins Center for Equine Therapy

Changing lives . . . one ride at a time.

aka Southern Reins   |   Collierville, TN   |  www.southernreins.org

Mission

The mission of Southern Reins Center for Equine Therapy is to serve individuals with physical, cognitive and emotional disabilities and hardship by providing equine-assisted activities and therapies to empower, inspire, nurture and succeed.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Jill Haag

Main address

916 Billy Bryant Road

Collierville, TN 38017 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4647784

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Other Services (D60)

Equestrian, Riding (N69)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In the greater Memphis area, there are 322,690 residents with disabilities age 5-64 who have the opportunity to benefit from equine-assisted activities and therapies offered by Southern Reins Center for Equine Therapy. Our nonprofit program serves children and adults with disabilities and hardship, including Down syndrome, autism, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, amputation, mental and physical disabilities, attention deficit disorder, and more. The therapeutic and recreational programs we provide focus on access and inclusion, foster compassion and caring, and encourage goal achievement and personal growth.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adaptive Horseback Riding

Offered to children and adults, age 6 and up.  The program benefits participants with physical, emotional, cognitive and social disabilities; or a combination of these challenges. Benefits of adaptive riding include improvement in joint mobility, balance and coordination, relaxation of spasticity, increased muscle tone, self-confidence through enhanced self-image, improved learning, concentration, spatial awareness, and motivation to set and achieve goals.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

The term Hippotherapy refers to how occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology professionals use evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning in the purposeful manipulation of equine movement to engage sensory, neuromotor, and cognitive systems to achieve functional outcomes. In conjunction with the affordances of the equine environment and other treatment strategies, Hippotherapy is part of a patient's integrated plan of care.Occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology professionals have incorporated Hippotherapy in practice in the United States since the 1970s. The American Hippotherapy Association, Inc. (AHA, Inc.) was formed in 1992 to provide a forum for education, communication, and research among therapy professionals interested in the use of Hippotherapy in treatment. AHA, Inc. created a conceptual framework in 1997 to (a) provide therapists with a theoretical basis for the utilization of Hippotherapy for improved function, (b) promote effective clinical problem-solving, and (c) generate hypotheses for scientific research.The therapist selects a horse/equine movement to match the specific needs of the patient. During treatment, the therapist continually monitors patient’s adaptive response and modifies equine movement to provide an appropriate challenge working towards functional goals. The outcome measure for the patient is a change in functional performance and/or a change in a functional impairment across environments. Standard documentation reflects progress of treatment within the patient’s plan of care and follows the guidelines of the therapist’s profession.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Southern Reins is honored to support the PATH, Intl. Equine Services for Heroes Program. The goal of the program is to improve the quality of life for military men and women, as well as first responders, who have been injured in service to our country. Therapeutic riding and equine assisted activities offers physical and emotional healing, with a focus on building confidence, self-awareness, improved communication, trust, and decreased anxiety and stress. Participants may be referred by a physician or therapist, current or past participant, family member, Alpha Omega Veterans Services, Department of Veteran’s Affairs, emergency services, or other service organization. Men and women diagnosed with traumatic brain injury, PTSD, amputation, physical injury or combat trauma often find positive change and tremendous benefit from their involvement with equine therapy. Horses are powerful and forgiving, social and inquisitive, and they are highly attuned to their environment. They provide a unique self-reflective experience that can provide healing in countless ways.Southern Reins’ Equine Services for Heroes offers therapeutic horseback riding and horsemanship programs. Our therapeutic riding sessions are offered for 6-week sessions and include grooming and tacking, ground work, and a riding lesson each week. Our horsemanship program is offered for those who do not wish to ride. The program includes grooming, horse care, horsemanship and ground work. Participants are also invited to support the operation of our facility as a volunteer.  These programs are offered throughout the year to support those who have given so much defending our freedom.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Unemployed people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

PATH Intl. Member Center 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Adaptive Horseback Riding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We are honored to have developed community partnerships with fellow non-profit organizations. By sharing resources, we are able to greatly multiply the positive effects that all of these programs prov

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our programs are designed to focus on the ability of each individual, providing opportunities to to enhance life skills and reach short and long-term goals. *2020 totals reflect impact of COVID-19

Number of veterans with PTSD served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

PATH Intl. Equine Services for Heroes

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Because of shelter in place initiatives implemented by our veteran services partners, participation decreased in 2020 due to COVID-19.

Number of staff members certified in subject area training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Adaptive Horseback Riding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers are the cornerstone of our program. The dedication of time and talent of our volunteer corp contributes beyond measure to the success of each of our participants.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Adaptive Horseback Riding

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Volunteer service hours include direct program support, barn help, equine care, special events, special projects and unpaid internships. *2020 Volunteer Hours reflect a decline due to COVID-19

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our program activities include adaptive horseback riding, Occupational Therapy incorporating Hippotherapy, Making Strides Recreation Therapy Program, Silver Stirrups Program, horsemanship and barn lessons through our Unbridled Horsemanship Program, equine-assisted psychotherapy, and PATH Intl. Equine Services for Heroes. We offer sessions throughout the year, and all activities are conducted by PATH, Intl. certified riding instructors, AHA certified therapists, and mental health professionals.

Our goal is to encourage participants to break through boundaries and develop their life skills through improvements in strength and physical ability, communication, and enhanced sensory processing and cognitive retention. The positive change we see in and out of the arena drives our passion to celebrate the ABILITY of each of our participants. Working with our horses, children and adults are able to turn struggle into success as they improve physical function, develop confidence, and achieve short and long-term goals that significantly contributes to their physical, social and emotional well-being.

Southern Reins is dedicated to maximizing our organizational impact and ensuring future sustainability through strategic partnerships, educational outreach, collaboration, and direct client outreach. We are honored to have developed community partnerships with Youth Villages, The Baddour Center, SRVS, Trezevant Manor, InDev Memphis, Alpha Omega Veteran Services, and the Memphis VA Medical Center. By sharing resources, we are able to greatly multiply the positive effects that all of these programs provide to the people we serve. 

To ensure the sustainability of our organization, we have implemented our 2019-2023 Strategic Plan to identify, evaluate, and implement processes to refine our program operations, ensure short and long-term financial stability, invest in human capital, and assess our capacity and infrastructure.

Southern Reins has experienced tremendous growth in a short amount of time.  Through the vision and leadership of our Board of Directors and senior staff, we have been able to expand our programming to serve a growing number of participants by implementing necessary infrastructure for expansion, while ensuring financial stability. At the core of all of our initiatives is our unwavering focus on the value of services we provide. The skills and expertise of our credentialed professionals provides an exceptional learning environment for our participants, and the services we offer to people with disabilities are unique, goal-oriented, and therapeutic that contributes to pivotal change for the individuals we serve.

Southern Reins actively recruits from within to provide additional leadership and job growth opportunities.  Many new instructors and instructors in training have been selected from existing staff and volunteers as ideal candidates.  Our horses and ponies also play a critical in our mission delivery.  Each horse serves an average of 10 participants a week; therefore, as we grow we are consistently monitoring our equine herd to ensure we have adequate horsepower to meet the demand.  Lastly, our volunteer corp is an essential component to our success. Southern Reins has trained more than 900 individuals as volunteers, and relies on the time, talent, and treasure of approximately 350 active volunteers to support our participants. We consistently look for new partnership opportunities to serve as many people with disabilities and hardship as can benefit through the programs we offer.  We will be expanding our mental health and equine-assisted learning programs in the near future with key partnerships that are in development to serve children with emotional and physical trauma, as well as group treatment centers.

Our program began in the fall of 2015 with 12 participants, and in 6 years we have experienced significant growth as we currently serve a roster of 250 children and adults throughout the year. A primary focus area in our Strategic Plan is the implementation of our strategic growth matrix that evaluates current capacity and projects future needs to ensure we have adequate infrastructure and resources for growth. A key initiative we are pursuing over the next 12-24 months is the development of outcome measures specific to skill progression by our participants. This data will provide documented evidence to validate the physical, social, and emotional benefits of our program.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

Southern Reins Center for Equine Therapy
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Southern Reins Center for Equine Therapy

Board of directors
as of 5/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

\ Courtney Smith

none

Term: 2020 - 2022

Courtney Smith

Kim Jordan

Charles Burkett

First Horizon Foundation

Lee Alexander

International Paper

Cliff Hunt

Standard Construction Company

Jill Haag

Executive Director/Southern Reins

Kevin Kimery

Kimery Wealth Management

Lance Moll

FedEx Freight

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/19/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.