PLATINUM2023

FREE THE OPPRESSED

"LOVE EACH OTHER. UNITE AND WORK FOR FREEDOM, JUSTICE, AND PEACE. FORGIVE AND DON’T HATE EACH OTHER. PRAY WITH FAITH, ACT WITH COURAGE, NEVER SURRENDER."

aka FREE BURMA RANGERS   |   COLORADO SPRINGS, CO   |  www.freeburmarangers.org

Mission

Free the Oppressed (FTO) supports the work of the Free Burma Rangers (FBR), which is a multi-ethnic humanitarian service movement working to bring help, hope and love to people in the conflict zones of Burma, Iraq, and Sudan. Working in conjunction with local ethnic pro-democracy groups, FBR trains, supplies, and later coordinates with what become highly mobile multipurpose relief teams. After training these teams provide critical emergency medical care, shelter, food, clothing and human rights documentation in their home regions.

Ruling year info

2015

President

David Eubank

Main address

PO BOX 60972

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO 80960-0972 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4648581

NTEE code info

Other Public Safety, Disaster Preparedness, and Relief N.E.C. (M99)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Religion Related, Spiritual Development N.E.C. (X99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The situation in Burma is as complex as it is long. Over 60 years of civil war have left Burma one of the poorest countries in the world. During this time, successive military dictatorships killed thousands of their own people and displaced millions in resistance areas. The resulting power vacuum has created a situation ripe for drug cultivation, child soldiers, acts of possible genocide, and starvation. In 2021 the Burma military has taken over in a coup and arrested Aung San Suu Kyi and other leaders in the National League for Democracy. Hundreds of thousands of Burmans and ethnics in the cities have protested and started a Civil Disobedience Movement which the military is trying brutally to crush. Also the Burma Army has increased its attacks against the Karen, displacing thousands, and increased its attacks against the Kachin, Shan and Ta’ang in northern Burma while many remain displaced in Arakan State of western Burma. Also, in Bangladesh, over 1,000,000 Rohingya live in squalid

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Burma ministries

To bring help, hope and love to people in the conflict zone of Burma. Working in conjunction with local ethnic pro-democracy groups, FBR trains, supplies, and later coordinates with what become highly mobile multipurpose relief teams. After training these teams provide critical emergency medical care, shelter, food, clothing and human rights documentation in their home regions. We use a program called Good Life Club to bring hope to young children in the region.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

To bring help, hope and love to people in the Middle East oppressed by ISIS. Working in conjunction with local groups, FBR helps free those being held captive by ISIS . FBR also provides frontline food, water, medical treatment, and other supplies to those who have been freed. FBR provides medical training to the Iraqi Army, and also documents and reports on atrocities committed by ISIS. Note: this work has also expanded into Sudan and helped people oppressed by the Sudan Armed Forces.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Providing help, hope, and love to people in Thailand. We support two hostels in Thailand, provide medical treatment, patient care and other medical training. We also support two hostels, students, and short-term missionaries in Thailand.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Each year we host a Global Day of Prayer for Burma. We also publicize events that are occurring in Burma, Kurdistan, Iraq, Syria, and Sudan. We may not bring about big changes, we may not stop the attacks, we may not save the day, but the small things we do, if God is in them, are eternal.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

The Good Life Club program is the component of FBR that focuses on children’s needs in the conflict zones of Burma. The Good Life Club team is comprised of men and women of different ethnicities and faiths with a desire to help children, and they provide assistance to all people regardless of race, ethnicity or religion. They believe that good life is not just physical but emotional and spiritual as well, and is something God desires for all people everywhere. They try to meet the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of the different communities they visit.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

FBR’s Jungle School of Medicine Kawthoolei (JSMK) operates a 14 month training course for health care workers in Karen State, Burma. The school and hospital/clinic started operations in 2011 and over the past 5 years has graduated more then 80 health workers, known as medics throughout Karen State. Trained medics function within FBR teams providing relief health care, and many go on to work in Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) clinics. Students are selected for the course by leaders from each district, and following graduation a small number remain at the campus for additional training. By the end of one year of training, medics are capable of diagnosing and managing the most important illnesses they will encounter.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Economically disadvantaged people

Burma Vision aims to plan, procure, transport, and deliver the public health components related to the eyes and vision: vision screening, dispensing of spectacles, eye drops and collaborate to bring cataract and other eye surgery to the people of Burma.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

ECFA 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people helped with food, medicine, or shelter

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric measures all of our program recipients, mission trips, medical treatments, GLC children, etc.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The purpose of the Free Burma Rangers is to share the love of Jesus and to be His Ambassadors wherever we go. We want to bring help, hope and love to people in the conflict zones of Burma, Iraq, and Sudan. Working in conjunction with local ethnic pro-democracy groups, FBR trains, supplies, and later coordinates with what become highly mobile multipurpose relief teams. After training, these teams provide critical emergency medical care, shelter, food, clothing, and human rights documentation in their home regions.

In the midst of continuing oppression and uncertainty in their country, Rangers from Burma feel the call of God to go help people under attack in Kurdistan, Sudan and other places in the world. We see the power of God in this and, as in Burma, we go compelled by His love to give help, hope and love in Jesus’ name. In 2014 we went on our first mission to Sudan, and in 2015, we began missions to Kurdistan with our ethnic Burma teams, sharing the love of Jesus, providing medical training on the front lines, doing children’s programs in the IDP camps and getting the news out. We stand against oppressors, be they in Burma, Kurdistan, or Sudan, and we’re also praying for the oppressors—and asking God for love for them. No one is beyond redemption. A Burma soldier who once murdered villagers left the army, joined our teams, repented and was baptized. He is a new man in Christ and this is our prayer for all of us: that we are the people God created us to be. Psalm 77:19 says what I feel about how God leads us, “Your way was through the sea, your path through the great waters; yet your footprints were unseen.” We follow an invisible God who visibly changes us!

We now have over 70 multi-ethnic, multi-faith relief teams and a wonderful staff of both locals and foreigners to support the following strategies:

Front Line Relief is one of the principle components of the actions performed by the Free Burma Rangers. FBR operates by equipping and empowering small teams with the skills and tools necessary to perform relief missions under any circumstances. The result of this decentralized strategy leads to more pinpointed aid adjusted to the needs of individual communities in some of the most rural areas of the countries in which FBR operates. In this regard, FBR’s unofficial guiding principle is: do not be led by comfort or fear, but be led by love.

FBR operates under any and all difficult conditions: in the jungles of Burma, deserts of Sudan or the mountains of Kurdistan. Ranger teams fill an aid gap where humanitarian relief is often needed most. Ranger teams are trained in a variety of different transportation methods and can carry items by foot, car, mule, or boat, depending on the mission.

Human Rights & Conflict Monitoring is a key part of the mission of the Free Burma Rangers. FBR’s network exists throughout Burma and has access to many areas that journalists or conflict monitors cannot normally reach. Through this network, FBR is able to obtain eye-witness testimony, video and photographic proof, and interviews on some of the most pressing news affecting Burma.

The Free Burma Rangers (FBR), in cooperation with local pro-democracy ethnic groups, conduct a combined training program on ethnic unity, leadership and relief activities hosted by the Karen National Union (KNU) in the Karen State of Burma for two months each year.

FBR’s Jungle School of Medicine of Kawthoolei (JSMK) trains rural medics and treats patients from villages in the surrounding mountains.

The Good Life Club program is the component of FBR that focuses on children’s needs in the conflict zones of Burma. The Good Life Club team is comprised of men and women of different ethnicities and faiths with a desire to help children, and they provide assistance to all people regardless of race, ethnicity or religion. They believe that good life is not just physical but emotional and spiritual as well, and is something God desires for all people everywhere. They try to meet the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of the different communities they visit.

One of the key components of ranger training is to promote a sense of ethnic unity. Burma is a highly divided country with over 135 distinct ethnic identities. In addition to this Burma is also highly divided via language and religious differences. While several conflicts currently exist within Myanmar, with causes due to many similar grievances; the ethnic organizations that are engaged in these conflicts are often not united. This has often played to the strength of the military of Myanmar, allowing them to make selective ceasefires with certain groups and engaging in conflict with oth

Each of our teams are comprised of the following:
Team Leader: Helps plan and coordinate missions. In charge of arranging mission security and relaying information to headquarters staff.
Medic: Takes care of all medical aspects of mission including: immediate patient care, patient referral, jungle medicine, and medical counseling.
Photographer: Takes photographs of mission activity, events and locations. Videographer: Takes video of mission activity, events and locations.
Good Life Club Counselor: Coordinates and conducts Good Life Club events in areas visited by FBR team. Is principally in charge of helping the psychological and spiritual situation of the areas visited by the Free Burma Rangers.

FBR’s Jungle School of Medicine of Kawthoolei (JSMK) trains rural medics and treats patients from villages in the surrounding mountains. Patients come for problems ranging from difficult pregnancies to persistent infections to landmine injuries. Some can be treated on the spot, others need longer-term follow-up, and a few require urgent evacuation to cities with modern surgical facilities. JSMK’s medics perform diagnostics and dispense treatment, while training students to take on increasing responsibilities in the provision of care.

We also have a dedicated Good Life Club team that is comprised of men and women of different ethnicities and faiths with a desire to help children, and they provide assistance to all people regardless of race, ethnicity or religion. They believe that good life is not just physical but emotional and spiritual as well, and is something God desires for all people everywhere. They try to meet the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of the different communities they visit.

In 2021, the Burma military took power in a coup, attacked its own people, and increased attacks on the ethnic people of Burma. The Burma Army is killing protesters in the cities and plains and killing and displacing thousands of ethnic people in the mountains. In spite of this, there is a feeling of solidarity, commitment, and hope amongst both the Burman and the ethnic people of Burma. The Burmese of the cities and plains have banded together to resist the tyranny in ways never seen before. The ethnic people in the mountains, chased from their homes, refuse to give up and continue loving and helping each other. Our FBR Ranger teams and other groups move amongst the ethnic people providing medical aid, food support, and being with them in love. The Burma military is more powerful than anyone here but we believe God is still more powerful and is giving us ways to help. There is a new humility and mutual respect among the Burmans and ethnic minorities. We were told by many Burmans: “We ask forgiveness that we did not care about or stand with the ethnic people who have been under attack all these years. We know now the suffering they face. We ask for forgiveness and are sorry. We are so thankful that, when we flee to their areas, they help us and risk their lives to save us. We all need to work together for freedom, and all people’s value and rights must be upheld. We are committed to that.” In Karen State, a leader who has helped many Burmans escape and find shelter told me, “We have to remember God’s grace and mercy. Without God’s mercy we Karen would not exist. And we do not deserve this, as we make many mistakes and sins. It is not just the dictators who do wrong, so do we. But we confess this and thank God for His forgiveness and grace. We may have to flee and suffer much but we will not lose even though the military is stronger. They are stronger than any of us, but not stronger than all of us and not stronger than God.” The ethnic people with us, as well as the Burmans, believe that the dictators cannot win. We know that behind the deadly attacks of the military and police against the people of Burma is a deep and formidable evil. This is first of all a spiritual battle. We pray against this evil in the powerful name of Jesus.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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FREE THE OPPRESSED

Board of directors
as of 09/27/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

David Eubank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/25/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.