I-5 FREEDOM NETWORK

A Corporate Response to End Human Trafficking

San Clemente, CA   |  i5freedomnetwork.org

Mission

To mobilize entire communities to the fight to end human trafficking with informed action through training education and legislative advocacy

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Brenda Wells

Vice President

Todd Forester

Main address

160 Avenida Granada

San Clemente, CA 92672 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4898095

NTEE code info

Citizen Participation (W24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Human trafficking is the fastest-growing illicit industry in the globe and the US is one of the largest consumers of commercial sex worldwide and unwitting drivers of labor trafficking. The invisibility of the crime along with persistent misconceptions allows it to flourish and take hold in our communities. Awareness, education, and legislative advocacy are essential for addressing the reality through Informed Action. The i-5 Freedom Network, a training and advocacy-focused organization, seeks to disrupt and prevent labor and sex trafficking by mobilizing all members of the community to engage in the fight to end human trafficking. We do this through Community Awareness, Corporate Engagement, Hospitality Readiness Training, Legislative Advocacy, and Survivor Support

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Way2Work

Dale Carnegie-based professional and personal development seminars for survivors of human trafficking. These seminars are intended to build confidence through leadership, communication, conflict management, and presentation skills. Business etiquette and job interview skills are included and culminate in referrals for job interviews with our corporate partners

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Unemployed people

Differentiated training for staff to executives on how to identify and report human trafficking within zones of intersection and spheres of influence

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Victims and oppressed people, Domestic workers, Women and girls

Related Program

Way2Work

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of participants we had in our Way2Work program targeted towards human trafficking survivors and support providers.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal lay in our 5 pillars

Strategies include the development and deployment of the following resources and action

Our capabilities are found in our training expertise and organizational values

Success so far includes the following milestones
Our next steps look to be headed

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve survivors of human trafficking, businesses, and community members.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We implemented a laptop lending service to survivors so they can virtually attend our workshops during Covid if they do not have their own laptop. Developing our professional mentorship program, where volunteers can provide professional mentorship to survivors.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Community partners, when relevant,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has built trust between them and i5 programming, it has provided survivors with work opportunities, it has increased our collaborative opportunities with other organizations, and we have empowered survivors to have a say in how their feedback is used.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Feedback is often anonymous so we can't follow up with the individual,

Financials

I-5 FREEDOM NETWORK
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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I-5 FREEDOM NETWORK

Board of directors
as of 7/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Brenda Wells

JJ Wenrich

Jodie Wenrich

Johnnie Mattioli

Cheril Hendry

Mary Anne Marracq

Yvonne Bustamante

Whisper James

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/23/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/23/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.