PLATINUM2023

In Our Backyard

Linking Arms Across America in the Fight Against Human Trafficking

Bend, OR   |  www.InOurBackyard.org

Mission

Vision: All people are empowered to live in freedom Mission: Linking arms across America in the fight against human trafficking. In Our Backyard (IOB) focuses on ending the sex and labor trafficking of adults, and youths taking place right here in the United States. IOB works to educate the public, raising awareness and generating concern regarding this critical issue. The Organization also provides aid to victims, and provides a lead role in training public officials. Human Trafficking, in several forms, is proliferating right here in America's "backyard" As long as Human Trafficking occurs, IOB will be working toward the day when human enslavement no longer exists in the United States.

Notes from the nonprofit

TELLY AWARD - Silver Winner Every year, the Telly Awards showcase the best work created within television and across video, for all screens. The committee receives over 12,000 entries from around the world. Human Trafficking: A Lifeline was submitted under the General for Social Video category and was awarded the Silver Winner prize. Nita Belles, In Our Backyard Executive Direction explains, “When we first decided to work on this project, our goal was to shed light on the importance of the Freedom Stickers campaign. Not in our wildest dreams did we think we’d end up receiving this level of recognition. This is a testament to the importance of the work we do and a tremendous responsibility to continue speaking up for victims and survivors https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6I8nvMtRYo&feature=youtu.be

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Director

Cheryl Csiky

President and Founder

Nita Belles

Main address

1900 NE Divistion St Ste 107

Bend, OR 97701 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4996726

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Human trafficking is a crime and involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act. If the victim is under the age of 18, then any commercial sex act is considered human trafficking even if the minor believes they are doing it of their own volition. Human trafficking happens 365 days a year in every zip code in America. Human trafficking is a hidden crime as victims rarely come forward to seek help because of language barriers, fear of the traffickers, and/or fear of law enforcement. All traffickers ask is that we stay silent and they will continue to profit off the sale of innocent human beings. There are an estimated 27 million enslaved in the world today. Human trafficking is the second largest and fastest growing crime in the world. It is estimated that human trafficking generates many billions of dollars of profit each year. Drugs can only be sold once. Women, children and men can be sold over and over again for sex and labor

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Human Trafficking Awareness Training

IOB trains law enforcement officials, social service providers students, adults, and social service organizations about what human trafficking is, who is vulnerable, how to spot it and what can be done to help stop it.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Stickers are placed in public bathrooms in places where victims of human trafficking may be taken to use the facilities.
These stickers provide information about how a victim. can text a message to arrange to be recovered,

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of Freedom Stickers placed in public restrooms

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Freedom Stickers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of lessons taught

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Human Trafficking Awareness Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Freedom Stickers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In Our Backyard (IOB), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit links arms across our community and our nation in the fight against human trafficking.

Through more than a decade of dedication to this issue ‒ from rescue to restoration ‒ IOB has collaborated with top law enforcement, survivors, government officials, social service providers, and faith communities as the key to creating comprehensive, lasting change.

Focus areas include prevention of human trafficking through partnerships with local schools, victim outreach through Freedom Stickers placed in restroom stalls, and training to convenience stores, law enforcement, service providers and the general public. IOB raises awareness of human trafficking, brings justice to perpetrators by advising on legislation, connects survivors with services, and conducts anti-trafficking efforts surrounding large events like the Super Bowl. Our vision is a world where all people are empowered to live in freedom. For more information, please visit http://www.inourbackyard.org

Freedom Sticker: IOB places Freedom Stickers in public restrooms, providing a pathway to freedom for victims of human trafficking. Freedom Stickers contain a message of hope and the National Human Trafficking hotline - a non-governmental agency with local networks of victim-centered responders.

Anti-Trafficking at the Super Bow: In connection with our year-round anti-trafficking work, IOB conducts a 10-day operation to eradicate sex trafficking surrounding the Super Bowl through partnerships with top law enforcement, nonprofits and government agencies in host cities across America.

Convenience Stores Against Trafficking (CSAT): empowers the convenience store industry to take a stand against the atrocity of human trafficking in America. CSAT provides training, victim outreach, and public awareness of human trafficking to convenience store partners. As the eyes and ears of our nation's communities, convenience store employees can learn to spot human trafficking, safely report traffickers, and save lives. CSAT is a vital link in stopping human trafficking in America.

Students & Teachers Organizing Prevention of Human Trafficking (the STOP HT Project): Will implement an in-depth curriculum, teacher and counselor training, and parent support through middle and high schools in Central Oregon, as well as drop-in centers and juvenile justice. Our goal is to strengthen youth, and the community of parents, teachers and staff that support them, so that they are no longer vulnerable to traffickers.

Objectives include: (1) increasing understanding among youth, teachers, parents and service providers of human trafficking indicators and risk factors, and (2) improving resiliency against traffickers among youth by reducing risky behaviors, improving boundaries in relationships, and increasing willingness to seek help and save lives.

Legislative Advising
In Our Backyard continues to act as an advisor on human trafficking to government offices in Oregon and across the nation. While IOB does not engage in lobbying, we do provide expert testimony regarding the nature of human trafficking and how proposed legislation may impact it.

Survivor Advocacy
IOB implements a victim-centered, trauma-informed response and works with human trafficking survivors. IOB connects them with services including, but not limited to: housing, mental health counseling, health care, etc.

National Speaker & Trainer
IOB's Founder and E.D., Nita Belles is a leading anti-human trafficking experts in the movement. Belles trains and speaks nationally on many aspects of human trafficking and how to stop it. Topics include: Human Trafficking 101, To Super Bowl & Beyond, Law Enforcement/Parole & Probation, Emergency Room & Medical Staff, Colleges & Universities, Churches & Faith Based Organizations, Self Care & Secondary Trauma in Anti-Human Trafficking Work, Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children, Labor Trafficking and The Link between Pornography and Sex and Labor Trafficking.

Human Trafficking happens 365 days a year in every zip code in America. The only way to effectively combat this atrocity is to link arms across America.

We partner with local and national organizations, law enforcement, service providers, non-profits, government agencies, and community and faith-based organizations. IOB works closely with other organizations to collaborate on effective legislative efforts, anti-human trafficking operations, awareness events and programs. We are not interested in reinventing the wheel or duplicating efforts, but desire to work cooperatively across the movement to employ our strengths to create the best outcome.
Nita Belles, In Our Backyard (IOB) Founder and Executive Director, began her journey as a tireless crusader against human trafficking in 2006, when she witnessed the cruelty of this atrocity and was compelled to take action.

As a recognized national leader and expert in the anti-trafficking movement, Belles works tirelessly to link arms across America in the fight against human trafficking. Expanding upon her first book written in 2011, Belles authored what has been acclaimed as the primer on human trafficking: In Our Backyard: Human Trafficking in America and What We Can Do to Stop It (Baker Books 2015).

Because of her expertise, she is often called upon to advise on human trafficking legislation. In her years of dedication to this issue ‒ from rescue to restoration ‒ she has collaborated with top law enforcement, survivors, government officials, social service providers, and faith communities as the key to creating comprehensive, lasting change. After a career in business, Nita earned her Master's Degree in Theology with a Concentration in Women's Concerns.

After working to fight human trafficking for many years, In Our Backyard obtained 501c3 status in 2015. Since then, In Our Backyard has obtained grants, corporate sponsorships, and individual donations to ensure the sustainability of our work. In Our Backyard has also hired a small team of qualified and passionate staff to carry out its mission.
Our 2017 Accomplishments are:
Implemented a victim-centered response and worked directly with 34 human trafficking
survivors. IOB connected them with services including, but not limited to: housing, mental health counseling, health care, financial and legal aid, law enforcement support.

Distributed 78,000 Freedom Stickers to be placed in public restroom stalls in all 50 states (15 states were added in 2017). Advised on six pieces of human trafficking legislation. One bill that passed mandated the posting of Freedom Stickers in rest areas across Oregon.

Provided 62 trainings, prevention and awareness talks and educated 6,500 people on human trafficking.

Utilized 45 media opportunities (print, digital, radio and TV) to educate the public about the
realities of human trafficking. More copies of In Our Backyard: Human Trafficking In America And What We Can Do To Stop It, written by E.D. Nita Belles sold in 2017. This results in both raising awareness of human trafficking and funds for IOB as an organization. (All proceeds go to IOB).

Conducted our eighth operation surrounding the Super Bowl, which included distribution of 2,150 Missing Children's Books and 4,200 Freedom Stickers. Three of the 36 children featured in the Missing Children's Book were recovered. IOB also provided 104 viable leads to law enforcement who recovered many victims, arrested 11 traffickers and 100 sex buyers.

Launched our Convenience Stores Against Trafficking program in January 2017. Since then,
have partnered with 8,280 convenience stores locally and nationwide to provide Freedom
Stickers. The average convenience store serves 1,000 customers per day, which means CSAT currently has visibility with more than 8 million people daily. While we have no way of estimating the number of victims of human trafficking that pass through convenience stores, survivors have told IOB that they went to convenience stores at least daily.

Provided prevention education for 600 students in middle and high school in Central Oregon.
Redmond School District requires HT training from IOB in their middle and high school health classes and IOB has formed partnerships with other school districts to expand the program in 2018.

Raised more than $70,000 during our 2nd annual Fall Freedom Fest, including our generous matching donor.

Our focus for 2018 is the expansion of the STOP HT Project for prevention in Central Oregon schools and the expansion of Convenience Stores Against Trafficking program across the nation. We will also focus more on measuring and communicating our success toward stopping human trafficking in the coming years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

In Our Backyard
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

In Our Backyard

Board of directors
as of 01/17/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sherry Schwartz

In Our Backyard

Term: 2016 -

Gabriella Van Breda

World Impact Network

Dieter G. Struzyna

Advocates Law Group

Jeff Lenard

Vice President of Strategic Industry Initiatives, National Association of Convenience Stores (NACS)

Molly McDade

Sergeant for the MCSO jail system for Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office

Kristina Elliott

Oregon Judicial Department’s Juvenile and Family Courts Programs Division as the field manager for the Citizen Review Board program,

Haley Bower

Director of Marketing Wholesale Foods, Clipper Petroleum

Nita Belles

Nita is the Founder and President of IN OUR BACKYARD. She contributes greatly to the vision of fighting human trafficking. She is an author, public speaker and works with legislative bodies to assist in anti-human trafficking legislative work.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/17/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/17/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.