Oklahoma City Family Justice Center, Inc., dba Palomar

Providing protection, hope and healing

aka Palomar   |   Oklahoma City, OK   |  palomarokc.org

Mission

Palomar provides protection, hope and healing. We envision an Oklahoma City that is free from violence, where safety and security is felt. Palomar integrates innovative services among collaborative providers to:Work together to interrupt the cycle of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, child abuse and elder abuse;Provide long-term support for victims and their children to heal from trauma;Hold offenders accountable;Act as a catalyst to create a community and culture that is free from violence; andEmpower survivors to thrive.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for supporting a better future for services to victims of family violence. The Family Justice Center model has been identified as a national best practice with outcomes including: increased effectiveness in service accessibility enhanced victim safety and increased offender accountability. The need in our community is great, and the future is full of possibilities. Thank you for dreaming big with us and your continued support.

Ruling year info

2015

CEO and founder

Kim Garrett

Main address

1140 N. Hudson

Oklahoma City, OK 73103 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-5502128

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Palomar, Oklahoma City’s Family Justice Center (OKCFJC), is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary service model where teams of professionals come together under one roof to provide coordinated services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, child abuse, elder abuse and human trafficking. The mission is to provide protection, hope and healing. According to the National Violence Against Women Survey (2011), the lifetime prevalence of rape, physical violence and/or stalking towards women by an intimate partner is greater in Oklahoma than in any other state. For the past twenty years, Oklahoma County has had more Intimate Partner Homicides than any other county in the state of Oklahoma, with the exception of Tulsa County in 2014. Further, the Domestic Violence Homicide in Oklahoma 2019 report revealed 21 fatalities in Oklahoma County, greater than any other county in the state. As the largest county in Oklahoma, Oklahoma City (OKC) contributes significantly to the state

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Camp Hope

Camp HOPE is the only evidence-based curriculum camping and mentoring initiative in the United States that focuses on traumatized children who have been exposed to domestic violence. The vision is to break the generational cycle of family violence by offering healing and hope. Camp HOPE provides an opportunity for extensive physical activity, as well as a time to address trauma exposure. Collectively, the combination of both and reduce rates of physical and mental health issues into adulthood.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Palomar is a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary service model where teams of professionals come together under one roof to provide coordinated services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, child abuse, elder abuse and human trafficking.

Population(s) Served
Families
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Alliance for Hope International 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Palomar

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We envision an Oklahoma City that is free from violence, where safety and security is felt. Palomar integrates innovative services among collaborative providers to:

• Work together to interrupt the cycle of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, child abuse and elder abuse;
• Provide long-term support for victims and their children to heal from trauma;
• Hold offenders accountable;
• Empower survivors to thrive.

OKCFJC is one of the most exciting, lifesaving initiatives in the history of Oklahoma City. Palomar: Oklahoma City’s Family Justice Center is the co-location of a multi-disciplinary team of professionals from 38 agencies who work together, under one roof, to provide coordinated services to victims of family violence and their children. OKCFJC brings together police officers, prosecutors, civil legal services, health care providers, community based advocates, social services and several other agencies to provide wrap around care for these hurting families, in one location. This approach has been identified as a best practice by the United States Department of Justice in reducing violence, increasing offender accountability and breaking generational cycles of violence.

Palomar has become the most comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary response for crime victims in Oklahoma City. Palomar has a tremendous goal: to unify all of the possible services a victim may need and make them easily accessible by housing them in one convenient location. In domestic violence, this coordinated response can make the difference between life and death for victims and their children. Integrating services is an innovative best practice approach to respond to our community’s needs and is in the best interest of victims. Further, agencies can save money and increase effectiveness of service delivery to victims and their children by locating services under one roof instead of expecting victims to travel from agency to agency to get needed services.

After years of thorough research, strategic planning, design, and development of the Family Justice Center model, the doors officially opened to clients on February 2, 2017. In the first month of being opened, Palomar served 78 clients who had 221 visits. By December of 2017, that number had grown to 167 clients per month with 592 visits. In 2021, despite the COVID-19 Pandemic, 4,340 unduplicated clients received life-saving and trauma-informed victim services at Palomar! Palomar had 13,761 client visits, demonstrating that despite a pandemic, clients continue to return multiple times for services.

We attribute this growth to ongoing improvements in community awareness of Palomar's presence and continued outreach efforts through social media, traditional media, and speaking engagements by Palomar staff members, board members, and VOICES committee members who advocate on behalf of victims and Palomar. Recent data shows that Palomar has helped clients from 95 zip codes across Oklahoma.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Oklahoma City Family Justice Center, Inc., dba Palomar
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Oklahoma City Family Justice Center, Inc., dba Palomar

Board of directors
as of 07/05/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tricia Everest

Palomar

Term: 2015 -

Tricia Everest

Frank Merrick

Robert Lewis

Drew Edmondson

Cathy Keating

Amy Gray

Cecilia Robinson-Woods

Kelly Forbes

Sam Curtis

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/28/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.