Florida Urgent Rescue, Inc

We save animals from kill shelters and other urgent situations.

aka F.U.R.   |   JACKSONVILLE, FL   |  www.floridaurgentrescue.com

Mission

The mission of Florida Urgent Rescue (F.U.R.) is to save animals from kill shelters and other urgent situations. F.U.R. rescued 2,600 dogs and cats. We take on tough cases, including dogs who have gunshot wounds, embedded collars, cancer, broken bones and other major medical problems. We rescue seniors, pregnant mamas and mamas with litters. We focus on rural shelters with limited resources, and we try to help the animals who need the most help. Our FUR Urgent Transport Program has helped rescue hundreds of animals in emergencies, including 12 hurricanes and natural disasters, we we completed multiple rescue missions on the ground in Ukraine. — We spend more than 3 times as much on vet bills as we take in through adoption fees. — 97% of total expenses are spent on programs.

Ruling year info

2015

Founder & President

Mike Merrill

Main address

7643 Gate Parkway #104-27

JACKSONVILLE, FL 32256 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-5526491

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster Program

FUR pulls dogs and cats from kill shelters and other urgent situations and places
the animals in foster homes to give them a chance to decompress, get them veterinary care, and prepare them for adoption. While in foster care, we pay for all veterinary expenses, as well as other incidental expenses as required. We purchase food, collars, leashes, crates, and other items needed to assist the foster families to care for their foster animal. We also purchase flea and heartworm prevention for the duration of their stay in the foster home. Because the animals are living with a foster family, we know a lot more about their temperament and personality, and we can use this information to help find a perfect match with the adopter.

Population(s) Served

Florida Urgent Rescue screens adopters, including a written application and home check for prospective adopters. We also start every adoption with a one week sleepover, so the potential adopter knows everything there is to know about the animal before making the decision to finalize the adoption. The adoption fees we charge include: spay/neuter, vaccinations, microchip, and any specialty veterinary care required. We also hold regular adoption events. Adoption fees are one of our primary sources of income to help offset our veterinary and foster expenses.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Florida Urgent Rescue provides all veterinary services necessary to ensure the dog or cat is healthy when they are adopted. We pay for spay/neuter, vaccinations, and microchips. We also pay 100% of the heartworm treatment costs for heartworm positive dogs, and we pay for numerous specialty surgeries and procedures for sick and injured animals. For example, we rescued 5 dogs who were hit by cars, 3 dogs with gunshot wounds, and had 18 different specialty medical procedures (i.e. amputation, broken bones, FHO, etc.). We also rescued 5 senior dogs with special medical challenges. Veterinary services is our single biggest expense, but this investment allows us to save lives of urgent dogs or cats who otherwise wouldn't have a chance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

During hurricanes and natural disasters, a flood of stray dogs and cats come into shelters. Overcrowded shelters have no choice but to kill animals who were already there to make room for incoming strays. FUR coordinated relief efforts during Hurricanes Harvey and IRMA in 2017, Hurricanes Florence and Michael in 2018, and Hurricanes Barry and Dorian in 2019, Hurricane Laura in 2020 and Hurricane Ida in 2021. Many big shelters get help from large national organizations, but small rural shelters are often overlooked and forgotten. FUR coordinates the logistics, arranges vet care, and manages the transport for smaller shelters. FUR also conducts non-emergency transports to partners in shelters where there is greater demand and lower supply, thus relocating animals to shelters and rescues where they can be safely adopted.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Foster Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Florida Urgent Rescue (FUR) saved 1,856 animals in the first 7 years in operation, including 1,390 dogs and 454 cats.

Number of Major Medical, Special Needs and Cruelty Cases

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Veterinary Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Florida Urgent Rescue (FUR) rescues animals with major injuries who would have likely have been been considered "irredeemable" and killed if we hadn't rescued them.

Cost Per Life Saved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Florida Urgent Rescue spends less per life saved that most larger shelters. We have almost no overhead, and more than 97% of expenses are spent on programs.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals are to rescue animals from kill shelters and other urgent situations. Our primary focus is on helping rural shelters with limited resources. One shelter we support is outdoor kennels on the grounds of the prison. Another is behind the landfill. In many cases, the only way these animals get out alive is if a rescue group pulls them. In short, we try to help the animals who need the most help.

We focus on helping at risk animals who need the most help. While many rescues focus on a specific breed, we help any animal who needs our help, regardless of breed, size, age or medical condition.

We rescue dogs who were hit by cars, dogs with gunshot wounds, orthopedic injuries, and cancerous tumors. We rescue senior dogs, and pregnant dogs. We take in cruelty and major medical cases, with no idea what treatment or financial cost we'll have when we rescue them. We also trap and rehabilitate long term stray dogs, and we assist other rescues and private individuals trying to trap and recover missing dogs. 40% of the adult dogs we rescue are heartworm positive, and we pay for 100% of the heartworm treatment costs. Because we rescue sick and injured animals, our veterinary expenses account for a large percentage of our expenses, and we spent an average of $418 per life saved during our first 7 years of operation.

As a foster-based rescue, we don't have a shelter location. Instead, all of our animals are in foster homes living with families. As a result, we know a lot more about each animal, and we can do a better job matching the temperament of the dog or cat with the personality and lifestyle of the potential adopter.

Our fosters and volunteers take animals to vet appointment, adoption events, and meet and greets with potential adopters. We start every adoption with a one week sleepover, so the adopter knows everything there is to know about that animal before making the decision to finalize the adoption. If for any reason the adoption doesn't work out down the road, we always take the animal back.

Our fosters are spread out throughout Northeast Florida, so we have veterinary relationships with several vet clinics. We have negotiated rescue discounts with our participating veterinary partners, including free exams and discounted services.

Our senior managers have run startup businesses for many years, so we're taking advantage of their startup experience to keep operations efficient and effectively manage our resources.

When we launched Florida Urgent Rescue in Nov 2015, our goal was to rescue 40-50 animals a year. We far surpassed our original expectations, rescuing 2,609 dogs and cats in our first 7 years in operation. We've successfully established agreements with veterinary partners, including our heartworm treatment program; we've set up a network of foster homes for the animals we rescue; and we've established a volunteer base to assist us in transporting animals, conducting home checks, and participating in adoption events.

We've also expanded our FUR Urgent Transport program, helping to rescue animals in danger in natural disasters and other emergencies. In addition to rescuing animals in 10 hurricanes, we provided disaster relief after the Kentucky Tornado, again during the Eastern Kentucky Flooding. We also completed multiple rescue missions on the ground in Ukraine, rescuing animals in danger, reuniting refugees with their pets, and relocating refugee families wit pets.

In addition to saving more lives, we are implementing operational improvements to help manage our growth. We've hit the ground running, and we're ready to continue growing the organization to save more lives.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Florida Urgent Rescue, Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Florida Urgent Rescue, Inc

Board of directors
as of 11/12/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mike Merrill

Florida Urgent Rescue, Inc.

Term: 2021 - 2023

Mike Merrill

Kelly MacDade

Jana Andrews

Susan Merrill

Lawrence Moon

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data