United Way of Delaware, Inc.

Wilmington, DE   |  www.uwde.org

Mission

United Way of Delaware works to maximize the community's resources to improve the quality of life for all Delawareans. Specifically, United Way of Delaware works in collaboration with the community to: •Ensure that children are reading on grade level by third grade; •Help young people develop a path to college and career readiness; and, •Provide opportunities for individuals and families to achieve economic stability and financial empowerment.

Ruling year info

1948

Principal Officer

Ms. Michelle A. Taylor

Main address

625 N Orange St 3rd Fl

Wilmington, DE 19801 USA

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EIN

51-0073399

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (P12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (S12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Financial Stability and Empowerment Too many Delawareans are living at or near the poverty line, are pressured by dealing with traumatic living conditions, suffer employment instability or lack the education and/or vocational training necessary to stabilize their lives and achieve financial empowerment. Typically living paycheck-to-paycheck, these Delawareans often turn to payday lenders, high-interest credit cards and other financially dubious tools to pay everyday living expenses. This behavior sets up a cycle of indebtedness that can seem inescapable and that makes the idea of financial independence seem unachievable. In Delaware, African Americans are more than twice as likely as whites to live in poverty, and Hispanics are three times more likely to be poor. Urban areas experience higher rates of poverty. Poverty in Kent and Sussex Counties is higher than in New Castle County.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

United Way of Delaware Program

Through its fall annual campaign, United Way of Delaware reaches a statewide audience of thousands of individuals and more than 900 businesses to educate them about Delaware's health and human service needs. Each day, staff and volunteers of United Way of Delaware work to garner financial support for programs that address critical issues plaguing our community, such as infant mortality, child abuse and neglect, substance abuse, homelessness, mental illness, and many more. United Way of Delaware has established 16 standards of quality nonprofit management for its 59 full and 52 affiliate member agencies. Knowledgeable community volunteers and United Way of Delaware staff conduct annual reviews to ensure good stewardship of donated dollars. Through its Community Impact Fund, United Way of Delaware addresses a wide range of needs such as prenatal care, child abuse prevention, quality childcare, mentoring and tutoring programs for youth, employment for adults with disabilities, and programs for seniors, to name a few. Community Impact Fund investment decisions are backed by current, quality data such as the 2004 Delaware Community Needs Assessment, the first comprehensive assessment of its kind in the state since 1999. In collaboration with its partners from business, labor, government, human service agencies, and academia, vital demographic and problem incidence data was compiled and analyzed to identify critical issues as well as their severity. The needs assessment was created as a public document to be used for the greater good of the state of Delaware. In 2003, United Way of Delaware continued its progress toward full implementation of its Outcomes Initiative, which is focused on investing Community Impact funds in programs based on community need and demonstrated results of effectiveness, efficiency, and qualitative measurement. United Way of Delaware offers training and technical assistance to programs receiving Community Impact funding; in fact, the agency is the leading provider of human services outcome training in the state.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

UWDE’s 2024 Grade-Level Reading Goals Primary Goal
• 50% of students in Delaware’s promise communities will read on grade level by 4th Grade.

Supporting Goals
• Foster equity in our promise communities by working to ensure that appropriate levels of funding and other resources are delivered to these communities.
• Ensure that adults who directly impact students in our promise communities will have the knowledge and assets to enhance a child’s development.
• Partner with community-based organizations who share our agenda and deploy a multi-generational approach to literacy.

UWDE’s 2024 College and Career Success Goals
Primary Goal
• 75% of students from our promise communities within Delaware Pathways will matriculate into college or a career upon high school graduation.

Supporting Goals
• Foster equity in promise communities by working to ensure that appropriate levels of funding and other resources are delivered to these communities.
• Ensure that adults who directly impact students in our promise communities will have the knowledge and assets to enhance a child’s development.
• Partner with community-based organizations who share our agenda and believe in and support work-based learning.

UWDE’s 2024 Financial Stability and Empowerment Goals
Primary Goal
• 50% of the adults that engage UWDE’s financial empowerment resources will resolve their emergency and ameliorate the root cause(s) of their financial problems.

Supporting Goals
• Foster public policy that advances financial stability and empowerment.
• Ensure that resources are advanced and distributed equitably.
• Evolve UWDE’s focus to include financial acumen as the appropriate follow-up to financial empowerment

Grade-Level Reading Goals: UWDE launched Get Delaware Reading, a multi-year, multi-generational, year-round and holistic partnership aimed at ensuring that an increasing number of Delaware children are reading on grade level when they enter fourth grade. Other supporting initiatives include our Help Me Grow, My Very Own Library, Make Summer Smarter, and Delaware Afterschool Network. UWDE will aggressively pursue the goals of Get Delaware Reading, a dual-generational approach of engaging children and their caregivers in year-round, evidence-based activities that drive significant gains in reading scores. UWDE will align its work with existing best practices and will move with determination to: •Expand the Help Me Grow initiative to screen for developmental milestones; •Adopt Nemours’ Bright Start! Reading curriculum; •Aggressively expand My Very Own Library; •Engage with Parents As Teachers, Read Assist Delaware and others to amplify their work; •Expand Make Summer Smarter to prevent summer learning loss; •Adopt family engagement strategies that include home visits to counsel parents regarding employment opportunities, financial management skills, and other intervention strategies. College and Career Success Goals: UWDE engages young people in initiatives that foster learned behaviors and developmental skills essential to success in the workplace. We successfully launched Step On It!, our signature middle school program, we collaborate with the State of Delaware and others regarding Pathways To Prosperity which provides young people career training and mentoring experiences. We collaborate with the City of Wilmington and others to implement a Summer Youth Employment Program that places young people in real-world work situations. In executing its College and Career Success strategy, UWDE will work to ensure that Pathway students in our promise communities graduate from high school with the certification necessary to move straight into the job market, and/or to take on the challenges of college. This will include focused conversations regarding apprenticeships, credentialing, post-secondary education, and military service. Early work experiences play a critical role in healthy youth development. Through summer jobs, young people explore career options, discover personal interests and strengths, learn about work culture, build professional networks, develop skills and earn a paycheck. Focusing its work in our promise communities, UWDE will pursue a laser-focus to develop grassroots strategies that identify and engage a growing number of young people and, especially middle school students, in initiatives that prepare them for college and/or a career success. We will collaborate with community-based organizations to help youth develop the learned behaviors, developmental assets and developmental skills that will serve them in achieving lifelong success. Financial Stability & Empowerment Goals: UWDE partnered with the State of Delaware to build & expan

United Way remains the “mission of choice" for everyday people—and many of America’s largest corporations—who want to support stronger communities and help those in need. United Way was ranked #1 of America’s Favorite Charities in the Chronicle of Philanthropy list, and the NonProfit Times’ ranks United Way #1 in public support in the NPT 2019 Top 100 study! After nearly 75 years of service to Delaware, UWDE is among the most trusted and respected nonprofit organizations in the state. We have been entrusted with both the opportunity and the responsibility to serve with a level of leadership necessary to improve the quality of life for all Delawareans. Moving forward, our work is rooted in this five-year strategic plan approved and support by a diverse group of top corporate leaders from various sectors. We are confident that our vision, mission, values and strategic direction will keep us focused on addressing the most pressing needs in our communities. Our commitment is to advancing this work as a statewide leader that embraces the spirit of collective impact and that acts with urgency.

Philanthropy and Engagement - A generally healthy economy should support modest revenue growth for UWDE over the five years of Living United 2024. UWDE maintains a healthy base of nearly 22,000 donors and more than 4,200 volunteers. We must continue to grow revenue and engagement commensurate with the challenges we will face over the next five years. We believe there are a number of untapped markets that will support this growth.

Our Customer Experience-UWDE is committed to continually refining its donor experience, with the goal of providing every donor with a “world-class donor experience.” UWDE will be: •Properly resourced with the data and services donors expect •Prompt and responsive • Appropriate by tailoring our services for each individual •Personable, engaging, and polite • Meticulous by keep first-class donor records •Prepared to meet donors where they are, which may mean covering off hours •Open and honest • Cheerful and helpful.

Brand Development and Brand Awareness-UWDE has made important advances in addressing brand issues adding a monthly newsletter, an aggressive social media strategy, and a recently refreshed website. Our continued presence in the community through our participation in a wide range of community activities also contributes positively to the public’s understanding of UWDE. We must broaden and deepen these efforts over the course of the plan period. We will more frequently and deliberately share compelling stories of our work in all media and by •Establishing, through research, a baseline understanding of the degree to which donors and potential donors in our marketplace •Are aware of the UWDE brand •Understand the UWDE business model •Have a positive/negative impression of UWDE •Planting a “data flag” in the ground at the launch of Living United 2024 as a reference point to determine how effectively our strategy influences public opinion over the five-year plan period •Updating and refining UWDE’s Case for Support •Developing consistent messaging and branded materials for all audiences •Engaging new audiences with compelling social media content •Executing a comprehensive media relations plan •Constantly refreshing and updating UWDE’s website.

Financials

United Way of Delaware, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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United Way of Delaware, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 6/1/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

John D'Agostino

Santora Group

Term: 2018 - 2020

Edmund Green

KPMG

Gary Stockbridge

Delmarva Power Region, Pepco Holdings, Inc.

George Guido

Cullari Group

Rodger Levenson

WSFS Bank

Pat Troy-Brooks

No Affiliation

Lynn Miller

AAA Mid-Atlantic

Kevin Fitzgerald

Caesar Rodney School District

John D'Agostino

Santora Group

Mark Brainard

Delaware Technical Community College

Vincent Farrell

CitiBank

LaVerne Harmon

Wilmington University

John Panichella

Solenis

Wayne Smith

Delaware Healthcare Association

Ravi Subbaraya

No Affiliation

Terri Hartwell-Easter

T. H. Easter Consulting

Michele Schiavoni

Delaware Prosperity Partnership

Catherine Hogan

JP Morgan Chase

Betsy Amoroso

Mannington Mills

Dusty Blakey

Colonial School District

Karen Browne

Christiana Care Health System

Robert Clark

Wesley College

Jamie Clarke

A. I. duPont Hospital for Children

Liz David

W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.

Jeanmarie Desmond

DowDuPont

Dorrell Green

Red Clay Consolidated School District

Mary Hickok

Wilmington Trust

Gregory Morris

Louis Redding City County Building

Cheryl Russo

PNC Bank

Alvenia Scarborough

Chemours

Kathleen Shelton

FMC Corporation, Stine Research Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/17/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability