PLATINUM2024

Literacy Partners

New York, NY   |  www.literacypartners.org

Mission

Literacy Partners strengthens families through a two generation approach to education. With our free classes, community workshops, and educational media, low-income and immigrant parents and caregivers develop literacy and language skills they need to succeed in today’s world. Our research-based programs incorporate child development and parenting support to help parents and caregivers boost children’s early reading, social emotional growth, and school readiness. Designed to arm every parent and caregiver with the necessary tools to create success for themselves and a better future for the children in their care, Literacy Partners' programs break the cycle of poverty, improve job prospects, and close the achievement gap for children before they even begin school.

Ruling year info

1973

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Anthony Tassi

Main address

75 Maiden Lane Suite 1102

New York, NY 10038 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

51-0180665

NTEE code info

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our innovative approach is anchored around the power of storytelling. By arming parents with language skills and literacy tools they need to emotionally connect with their children and with one another, our students discover the universality of their struggles and the hope that they can achieve their educational and vocational goals.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

English for Parents

Group English classes for parents of young children

The 36-week program will help you improve your everyday English skills. The class also helps with parent-child bonding and helps parents read with their children more often. The program includes: classes with a highly-skilled teacher, one-on-one conversation practice with a native English-speaking partner, and practice using online tools.

Population(s) Served

One-on-one reading help for parents of young children and other adults

We focus on the basics of reading to help adults achieve their reading goals. We help parents feel more comfortable reading with their children. We also work with adults who don’t have children who want to improve their reading for other reasons. You can join a class that meets weekly online and work with a tutor one-on-one to improve your reading skills.

Population(s) Served
Adults

LEAP is an innovative program for young adults seeking to achieve their high school equivalency (HSE) degree. LEAP is a seminar series focusing on academic and parenting support, leadership and child development, and building a community for students to mentor and support each other. The goal is not just for students to achieve their degree, but to build life and parenting skills to help their whole family succeed.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Books of Their Own (BOTO) distributes 15 age-, gender-, and culturally-relevant new books to the children of our students each semester. Distribution of these books is accompanied by mentorship and coaching from our teachers on the importance of reading with your child. For most of our nearly 1,000 participants, these books represent a number of “firsts” -- the first time they’ve ever owned books and had a home library and the first time in which the characters and storylines reflect their own lives and experiences.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Workshops for Spanish-speaking parents

Spanish-language workshops help parents and caregivers support their child’s early learning. Parents watch video clips from Univision’s hit telenovela, La Fuerza de Creer, and discuss important issues related to parenting.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Caregivers, Parents, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes students in our ESOL and high school equivalency/LEAP, Basic Literacy classes, as well as our English conversation groups.

Program Quality

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

English for Parents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100 percent of students would recommend our program to a friend or family member.

Benefit to Children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

English for Parents

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

92 percent of students report that what they learned in our classes benefited their children, who demonstrated 68% more growth on early childhood development assessments compared to their peers.

Number of books distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Caregivers, Families

Related Program

Books of Their Own

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide our families with age- and culturally relevant books each year.

Number of youth who increased their weekly hours of homework/reading

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

English for Parents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

English for Parents students report a 76% increase in daily reading with their children.

Number of students showing improvement in test scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

English for Parents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020, 83% of students graduated to next level based based on pre- & post-testing results. Children of these students outperformed their peers on Head Start assessments of early lit by 21%.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Literacy Partners envisions a future in which all parents have the tools to achieve success for themselves and a better future for their children. We seek a world in which children grow up in families with access to the resources and support they need to not just survive but to actually thrive.

Our immediate goal is to ensure families' economic stability and to close the achievement gap for children from low-income immigrant children before they even begin school.

Extensive research shows that low-income New Yorkers who struggle to read, write, or speak in English face daunting barriers in advancing their family's economic security. Low literacy and limited English proficiency not only limit job prospects but make it harder to access health care, education, and other essential resources. Often, significant consequences of parental illiteracy are felt by the next generation: children whose parents cannot read to them, help them with their homework, or interact effectively with teachers and doctors face substantial educational delays.

Parental education plays a critical role in ending multi-generational illiteracy, poverty, and low educational attainment. Therefore, Literacy Partners provides intensive English language and literacy instruction for parents, combined with child-development information and support that helps our adult students promote their children's healthy development and school readiness.

Literacy Partners provides:
• English for Parents classes
• English discussion groups
• Adult basic literacy program
• Parenting workshops for young adults seeking to achieve their high school equivalency degree
• Learning Together workshops for parents to help them improve their children's early literacy development
• Educational media in both English and Spanish accompanied by facilitated workshops and toolkits

The centerpiece of our work is the delivery of intensive English language and literacy instruction for parents. We provide a rigorous curriculum that integrates English language, numeracy, and digital literacy with the parenting skills our students need to pass on their learning to their children. Our teachers work to boost students' confidence in using these new skills to achieve goals in the key domains of their lives: parenting, work, health care, finances, and communication with their children's schools.

Our classes are taught by full-time professional educators who are extensively trained in adult literacy, English language instruction, and child development. Unlike typical literacy classes, our classes meet 10 to 12 hours a week over a 36-week academic year. We provide a higher- and a lower-level class for parents to accommodate various literacy levels and language abilities. Lessons focus on written and verbal English language skills, in combination with projects that emphasize family conversation and reading. Our teachers continually coach their students to apply the literacy and language skills learned in the classroom to their lives outside of class and help them gain the confidence they need to navigate New York City's subways, schools, banks, and health care system.

Teachers also coach parents to obtain library cards, email accounts, government identification, and health insurance and teach them to use the internet so that they can access the full range of information needed to succeed as parents, workers, and community members.

Our classes are situated within Head Start preschool locations, which serve high-need, under-served families. Parents drop off their children at Head Start preschool and then just walk down the hall to attend our morning classes. For parents with children who are too young for Head Start, we offer supervised reading and play time for toddlers while our classes are being held.

Based on extensive research showing that having books available at home significantly boosts children's early reading and future academic success, Literacy Partners provides a library of at least 15 age- and culturally appropriate books, yearly, to each of our students' children.

Literacy Partners teachers, who carry out the fundamental work of our organization, are master's-prepared full-time instructors with expertise in English for speakers of other languages, adult education, and early child development.

A committed corps of volunteers augments the work of our teachers by providing one-to-one tutoring support to our adult students.

Our CEO, Anthony Tassi, came to Literacy Partners from the New York City Mayor's Office of Adult Education, where he worked to strengthen and coordinate the city's adult literacy programs under the Bloomberg Administration. He was previously a health policy advisor for the City of New York, where he came to understand that improving basic literacy of the population would have a considerable impact on health indicators. Anthony is responsible for having redirected the mission of Literacy Partners toward education for low-income immigrant parents to improve the economic stability of two generations. He is the co-creator of the Emmy Award–winning We Speak NYC video series to help immigrants learn English.

In addition, Literacy Partners' staff features two program directors with extensive experience in adult literacy and data, to ensure that the organization uses the data we receive from our own assessments and those of our Head Start partners to ensure that programs are continually adjusted based on solid, scientific information.

Literacy Partners relies heavily on data to help us continually evaluate and refine our program. Results to date show that our dual-generation approach is working:

• 94% of our parent-students make measurable academic progress each year, and two-thirds advance to the next academic level. Their confidence in using English to solve problems in everyday contexts, from reading traffic signs to communicating with their children's doctors, increases substantially.
• 99% of students say that our classes helped improve their English, and 100% would recommend the class.
• They transfer the benefits to their children immediately: 72% of parents in our English classes increased the frequency with which they read to their children - a key predictor of children's language development and school readiness. 97% of parents say their child benefited directly from what they learned.
• Most compelling, the children of Literacy Partners students, who tend to start preschool well behind their classmates on most measures, advance at a quicker pace than their peers, making an average of 67% more progress, from the beginning to the end of the year, on early-childhood assessments than than their Head Start peers. Children of our students outperformed their peers on Head Start assessments of early literacy by 21%.

Our classes go beyond the traditional definition of literacy education, helping parents acquire the skills they need to thrive in New York City, whether navigating the health care system, finances, the school system, transportation, or job searches.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Literacy Partners
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Literacy Partners

Board of directors
as of 03/21/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Courtney Kapes Lewis

Journalist and Political Consultant

Term: 2023 - 2027

Peter Brown

BLJ Worldwide

Alina Cho

CBS Sunday Morning

Leslie R. Klotz

ASPCA

Lawrence A. Jacobs

Mintz & Gold

Ianthe Dugan

Journalist

Neal Goff

Egremont Associates

Mark Gurevich

Maverick Capital

W. Ross Honey

Octave Group

Courtney Lewis

Marshall Wace North America, LP

Cynthia McFadden

NBC News

Sabastian V. Niles

Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz

Paul Parikh

Signet Jewelers

Jordan Pavlin

Alfred A. Knopf

Hope Pingree

Cover New York

Mark Subias

United Talent Agency

Todd Larsen

LexisNexis

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data