SILVER2023

MISSION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

aka MEDA   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.medasf.org

Mission

Rooted in San Francisco’s Mission District, MEDA is advancing a national equity movement by building Latino prosperity, community ownership and civic power. We envision generations of Latino families choosing where to call home, thriving economically, succeeding in learning opportunities, and leading policy and social change toward a more equitable society.

Ruling year info

1976

Executive Director

Luis Granados

Main address

2301 Mission Street STE 301

San Francisco, CA 94110 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

51-0187791

NTEE code info

Economic Development (S30)

Financial Counseling, Money Management (P51)

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

San Francisco's Mission District has always been a supportive place for low-income and immigrant Latinos. It's now one of the most unaffordable neighborhoods in the country. In fact, 8,000 Latinos have been forced from their homes in the last decade---that's over 25 percent of this community. The active evictions of low-income households and rising housing prices has resulted in higher income households replacing lower income households in the neighborhood. MEDA is using 40+ years of experience to keep Latinos and working families in the Mission District and help them thrive. MEDA creates opportunity for habitually under resourced families throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. MEDA is also committed to maintaining the cultural identity and enhancing the resources of the Mission District, as we help every student achieve and every family succeed as the lead agency of the Mission Promise Neighborhood.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing Opportunities Program

Sustaining families through affordable housing and homeownership opportunities, MEDA’s Housing Opportunities program provides one-on-one coaching sessions and group workshop curriculum in English and Spanish. Homeowners also learn how to protect themselves from predatory lenders and coaches conduct loan document reviews. MEDA is a HUD-Approved Housing Counseling agency and a member of the local collaborative known as HomeownershipSF, which strongly advocates for affordable housing.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Microenterprise development including workshops and one-on-one TA, access to capital. We also provide a retail business incubator and a technology training program for entrepreneurs. All services are bilingual English-Spanish.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Organizing through MEDA's membership program and policy advocacy for issue that are relevant to our constituency.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Immigrants and migrants

Free tax preparation for low and moderate income individuals

Population(s) Served
Adults
Immigrants and migrants
Economically disadvantaged people

Financial education and counseling to help families build credit, reduce debt and increase savings in the pursuit of long term goals and asset building.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Since 2014, with the creation of our Community Real Estate (CRE) program, MEDA has made strides in stabilizing LMI Latino families, seniors and transitional age youth, by securing over 1,400 affordable housing units in our pipeline and 100,000 square feet of affordable commercial space for local small businesses and community-serving nonprofits, including preserving close to 200 units through our Small Sites program.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

In 2015 the organization launched Fondo Adelante, its own community lending arm. This microlending enterprise takes an equitable approach to the borrower-lender relationship, focusing on providing fair and affordable loan options for individuals who are often deemed high-risk by other financial institutions. Fondo Adelante received CDFI status in 2017 and provided over $5M in low-interest loans to small business owners in the last year alone.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults

Provides job coaching, employment readiness, job placements, and retention support. The initiative includes three programs: Mission Digital, Mission Admins, and Mission Techies. All of these programs are serving San Francisco residents, specifically targeting Latinos and other community members of color. With Mission Digital focused on basic digital literacy, Mission Admins focused on intermediate digital literacy, and Mission Techies focused on advanced digital literacy and informational technology services, we are actively upskilling community members at all levels.

Population(s) Served

Started in 2013, MPN is a cradle-to-career continuum of wraparound services to strengthen families and students. Based on the theory that economic stability for families will lead to improved outcomes in school, MPN’s two-generation approach serves families at nine K-12 schools, three early learning centers and 11 family child care providers — connecting families to services, supporting students and guardians in schools, and using Results-Based Accountability to define and measure outcomes. MPN used its infrastructure and community trust to respond quickly and comprehensively to the COVID-related needs of low-income neighborhood families. Families were connected to: food; housing assistance’ employment assistance; technology support; mental health resources, and financial support. This work was done in partnership with community agencies, and in alignment with city and school district priorities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Council of La Raza (NCLR) - Affiliate 2012

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients placed in full time jobs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Workforce Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of low-income units in market-rate neighborhood

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Real Estate

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who received free tax prep services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

VITA Site Free Tax Prep

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have built our strategic plan around 5 key results or conditions of well-being for the community we serve:
Result 1 - Families are financially thriving
Result 2- Families have affordable and stable housing
Result 3 - Children and youth succeed in school
Result 4: San Francisco's Latino residents are decisions-makers in the institutions and political systems that affect their lives
Result 5 - The Mission is a strong and supportive community for Latino residents, businesses and institutions.

To achieve our mission, we revised our core values, which dictate how we behave on an ongoing basis: community-focused, collaborative, adaptive leadership, impact drive, and fairness and equity.

Adaptive leaders and collaboration with CBO's and City officials.

We are working on creating family economic success in a neighborhood experiencing rapid gentrification. While we are making inroads, there is still much work to be done, for which we are seeking funding.

Financials

MISSION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MISSION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Board of directors
as of 02/01/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rafael Yaquian

Goldfarb and Lipman LLP

Jabari Herbert

Managing Member, The Herbert Enterprises Group

Kevin Stein

Deputy Director, California Reinvestment Coalition

Whitney Jones

Director of Housing Development, Chinatown CDC

M. Teresa Garcia

Family Resource Center Program Associate, First 5 San Francisco

Rafael Yaquian-Illescas

Attorney, Goldfarb-Lipman

Ed Cabrera

Regional Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Region 9

Marco Chavarin

Vice President, Community Development at Citi

Ysabel Duron

Founder/President, Latino Cancer Institute

Rebecca Patino

Managing Director, First Republic Bank

Dr. Carina Marquez

Infectious diseases physician and researcher and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/27/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/31/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.