Bradley Angle

Portland, OR   |  www.bradleyangle.org

Mission

Bradley Angle's mission is to serve all people affected by domestic violence. We place any person experiencing, or at risk of, domestic violence at the center of our services and provide support for safety, education, empowerment, healing, and hope.

Ruling year info

1976

Executive Director

Bri Condon

Main address

5432 N Albina Ave

Portland, OR 97217 USA

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EIN

51-0188664

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Hot Line, Crisis Intervention (F40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Services

The Bradley Angle emergency shelter is confidentially located and provides safe shelter, advocacy and support for adults and youth escaping domestic violence. With nine sleeping rooms, the shelter can serve approximately 20 people at any given time.  The average length of stay is 8-10 weeks.  Advocates assist participants in developing safety and action plans, find the resources necessary for them to find safe and permanent housing, and facilitate support groups and parenting assistance. Other services include case management and emergency food, clothing and personal items.

Population(s) Served
Adults

While the impact of domestic violence crosses all social, economic, and racial lines, there are concerns unique to communities of color and barriers to accessing traditional services. Some of these barriers include:

1) Cultural or religious beliefs that keep survivors from leaving the abusive relationship or involving outsiders
2) Strong loyalty ties to race, culture, and family
3) Distrust of law enforcement, the criminal justice system, and social service agencies
4) Lack of culturally and language specific services
5) Fear that their experiences may confirm unfair ethnic stereotypes
6) Legal and immigration status

For women of color, higher rates of poverty, poor education, limited job resources, language barriers, and fear of deportation increase their difficulty finding real help.

For African women, domestic violence can be a cultural norm, and impoverished African-American women are one of the highest risks groups for domestic violence. In March 2011, Oregon Department of Human Services reported that 21% of shelter residents and 12% of those seeking support services outside shelter are African-American. Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control recently reported 4 in 10 African-American women have been victims of physical violence or intimidation by an intimate partner in their lifetime.

Bradley Angle believes that culturally-specific services and culturally-specific support groups made up of others who share similar experiences, are vital to providing the highest probability of success in creating safety and achieving self-empowerment for domestic violence survivors.
Launched in 2007 as a drop-in center and referral hub, Healing Roots offers African immigrant and African American survivors culturally specific support. Services include drop-in hours, advocacy, emergency assistance, and weekly support groups with a congregate meal and childcare. We have a substantial number of community partners who work with us to maximize the resources available to Healing Roots participants and network with them regularly. We also provide community outreach and education about the prevalence and impact of domestic violence on the African immigrant and African American communities in Portland.

The Healing Roots program connects African and African American participants with empowering information and resources to rebuild their lives and dream a better future for themselves and their children. Healing Roots advocates are all women of color; and one speaks both Swahili, Somali, and Arabic.

Population(s) Served

Domestic violence generally evokes images of physical abuse. However, many of the survivors who turn to Bradley Angle for help and support also contend with the devastating effects of economic abuse. Economic abuse is one of the least recognized and least understood forms of abuse employed by an abusive spouse or partner. Economic abuse can include being denied access to bank accounts and credit cards, being prevented from working, ruining a partner’s credit, and other tactics that keep a victim economically dependent and socially isolated. This is significant since financial security (a source of income, employment stability) is the top predictor of whether or not a survivor of domestic violence can get free and stay free from abuse. Research shows that survivors with economic skills are more likely to leave abusive situations and sustain themselves and their families in the long-run.

The path to economic empowerment requires time. Many of the participants Bradley Angle works with have never had access to a checking account or the opportunity to establish their own credit. What’s more, it is common for an abuser to deliberately ruin the credit of the person they are abusing, create heavy debt in their name, and jeopardize their employment. Survivors must search for jobs, participate in job-readiness programs, research and identify affordable housing and childcare options, repair credit damaged by abusive partners, and, for those with children, deal with the day-to-day challenges of taking care of a family. It is not surprising that survivors of domestic violence need unique assistance to become financially secure. Bradley Angle recognized these dynamics when it launched the Economic Empowerment program in 2009. The program includes financial education and access to financial tools that help build a future of economic stability.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Law enforcement, government agencies, and the general population now acknowledge that domestic violence is a serious public health problem. The most commonly understood type of abuse involves partners of the opposite gender engaging in behavior that is both physically and mentally harmful, with the victim typically being the female. Less universally recognized is the occurrence of domestic violence among partners of the same sex.

Research tells us that domestic violence among same-sex couples occurs at similar rates as domestic violence among straight couples. Approximately 30% of queer couples experience domestic violence. Unfortunately, survivors in same-sex relationships often are not receiving the help they need. This is so for many reasons, including: the lack of legal recognition of same-sex relationships, the failure of law enforcement to identity and properly handle domestic violence cases involving LGBTQ survivors, and the lack of available resources for this community. While the dynamics of domestic violence are similar in straight and same-sex relationships, LGBTQ survivors have additional risks and barriers to seeking help. Their abusers can threaten “outing” them to work colleagues, family, and friends. They may be reluctant to report the abuse to legal authorities because doing so would force them to reveal their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Offering supportive services for sexual minorities has been an organizational priority since its inception. Bradley Angle was one of the first domestic violence agencies in the country to offer culturally specific programs for LGBTQ survivors and one of the first to make shelter available to survivors regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Bradley Angle is the only organization in Portland that specifically provides culturally-relevant services to LGBTQ survivors of domestic violence.

LGBTQ Program services include: safety planning, emergency shelter, housing assistance, two support groups that meet weekly in community settings, advocacy, and assistance with basic needs.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people

The Bradley Angle Resource Center is home to all of the agency's community based programs, including: Healing Roots, LGBTQ, and Economic Empowerment. The Resource Center staff also provide support groups and healthy relationship classes for survivors, emergency food, and crisis intervention.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Bradley Angle’s Housing Assistance Program provides housing and support for survivors of domestic violence. For many survivors, this is a crucial first step in rebuilding their lives. Our services include:

Help finding and keeping safe and stable housing options
Short- and medium-term rental assistance
Emotional support to help survivors build strong and healthy relationships
Ongoing advocacy and support to help survivors realize their longer-term goals—such as education or career aspirations
Bradley Angle works with a local network of domestic violence providers to ensure survivors get equitable access to housing resources. This coordinated approach is part of a nation-wide effort to tackle housing and homelessness known as Coordinated Access.

In Multnomah County, this process begins with a Safety and Stabilization Assessment (SSA). This assessment comprises a set of questions that help us understand your current situation and determine the most suitable housing option to meet your needs. The SSA takes about an hour to complete with an advocate and is best completed it in person.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, LGBTQ people, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Emergency Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

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Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Financials

Bradley Angle
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Bradley Angle

Board of directors
as of 9/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Angela Frazier

Sisters in Public Health

Term: 2023 - 2021

Sarena Mestas

CareOregon

Delilah Pepin

ZeroWall

Beth Miller

Cascadia Whole Healthcare

Nikki Thompson

Metropolitan Public Defender

Janice Jacobs

Albertina Kerr

Nichole Houston

TriMet

H Jackson

Jackson Shine Co

Zanele Mutepfa

Brand Zanele

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/02/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data