Womens Transitional Living Center, Inc.

aka WTLC   |   Fullerton, CA   |  www.wtlc.org

Mission

WTLC’s mission is to help individuals and families escape the depths of domestic violence and exploitation. Since 1976, our guiding principal has been to end the cycle of violence and exploitation through comprehensive services grounded in evidence-based practices. With a strengths-based, survivor-driven and trauma-informed approach, survivors create healthier and safer lives. WTLC’s programs are flexible and responsive to each survivor’s unique needs. In this way, survivors from a range of backgrounds and experiences receive tailored support addressing personal barriers to long-term stability. Domestic violence and human trafficking are major public health crises, and community support and engagement is integral in WTLC’s work to create a world without violence.

Ruling year info

1976

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Mark Lee

Main address

P.O. Box 916

Fullerton, CA 92836 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

51-0201813

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One in three women and one in four men have experienced physical violence by an intimate partner, as reported by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Additionally, according to the Human Trafficking Hotline, 10,949 cases of trafficking were reported in the United States 2018 and, of these, 1,656 originated in California. WTLC strives to end the cycle of violence and exploitation both in the individual lives of the survivors who reach out to us for help, and in our community at large. This involves providing flexible, responsive shelter and recovery services to the individuals and families in our programs, while also providing education and awareness services throughout Orange County to help encourage a shared commitment to safety. We truly believe that together our community can create a safer and stronger society for all its members.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

24-Hour Bilingual Helpline

Through our 24/7 bilingual hotline (877-531-5522) and text line ([email protected]), all survivors of domestic violence and human trafficking can speak with trained advocates who provide crisis assistance and information about shelters, legal advocacy, health care centers and counseling.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Provides a range of shelter options with supportive services to meet the priorities of the survivor. Emergency motel stays, immediate shelter, and longer term housing ensure survivors can focus on their recovery without the stress of housing instability. Survivors of domestic violence and human trafficking often leave their situations of violence with very limited income, support networks, and resources. Bridge Housing ensures survivors have a safe, comfortable, and supportive space from which survivors can find recovery. This year we have also introduced our Key Housing Program, which uses a Housing First model to help survivors find safe, stable, long-term housing for themselves and their families. In response to the increasing need for affordable housing in OC and the low housing inventory rates, WTLC is the first to create and launch an innovate housing program that pairs OC homeowners with survivors in need of housing, leveraging the empty space for both parties' benefit.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Homeless people

All supportive services are mobile, bringing them to the homes and communities of survivors, or available at WTLC's Center facility. These services include the provision of basic needs, such as on-site medical care and screening, food, clothing, and toiletries; career development, wherein WTLC offers resume assistance, interview techniques, working wardrobe, work experience programs, and job placement; clinical/support groups, wherein WTLC provides a variety of educational, process , and empowerment groups, including parenting, budgeting, communication, conflict resolution, art therapy, and self-esteem building; counseling/therapeutic services, wherein our highly trained counselors provide a range of trauma-informed services to children and adults in an individual, family, or groups setting; housing assistance, wherein WTLC offers assistance with move-in, rent, furniture, and basic household items; and resource and referral assistance.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

WTLC provides educational workshops to businesses, schools, organizations and the community at large, teaching tools to reduce and prevent violence in personal lives and the community; offers support groups throughout Orange County to survivors to discuss reducing harm and building health relationship with their families, communities and in their personal relationships; and WTLC Advocates work with local law enforcement following up on reports where police assistance was requested to address a domestic concern, to offer support and referrals to services to reduce or eliminate harm. This program also helps raise awareness in our community of less well-known situations of violence and exploitation, as well as the resources available to survivors of these situations. Specialists work in the community to build knowledge about topics such as human trafficking and elder abuse, increasing the number of entry points for services and improving access for survivors of these often hidden abuses.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

WTLC is BIA certified, with 7 trained staff and provides free legal advocacy and support on issues such as divorce, immigration relief, T-VISA, U-VISA, legal separation, child support, custody, criminal records, visitation and restraining orders. Survivors are assisted with paperwork, court proceedings, and are provided with legal referrals for cases needing legal representation. Survivors of domestic violence and human trafficking often have a range of legal needs, and WTLC’s Legal Advocates ensure participants are able to navigate the court system with confidence.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Board of Immigration Appeals - Accreditation 2016

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

OC Partnership 2008

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Bridge Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

WTLC's Bridge Housing Program includes a range of shelter and housing options, from emergency motel stays and immediate shelter to transitional housing and long-term housing placements.

Number of clients assisted with legal needs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Legal Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

WTLC's Legal Advocacy team helps survivors of domestic violence and human trafficking address legal needs in areas such as divorce, child custody, restraining orders, and immigration.

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Supportive Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

WTLC's Clinical Advocacy provides individual, family, and group counseling services to survivors and their children. Groups can include PTSD, Substance Misuse/Addiction, and Therapeutic Art.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Provide a trauma-informed, transformative experience for all participants;
2. Strengthen opportunities for participants to reach their goals;
3. Develop and engage effective ways to measure and evaluate the work of WTLC;
4. Communicate the impact of WTLC to the broader community;
5. Recruit and retain high quality, diverse staff and board of directors; and
6. Expand and strengthen WTLC’s operational and financial capacity.

1. Provide a trauma-informed, transformative experience for all participants
a. Assess our service experience across all programs to identify areas to improve trauma-informed care
b. Conduct a feasibility study to determine if WTLC should move towards the direction of becoming a “Trauma-Care Center”
c. Research and implement upcoming best practices in providing services to survivors
2. Strengthen opportunities for participants to achieve their goals
a. Conduct a needs assessment/ gap analysis to determine which services and strategic partnerships are needed
b. Complete planned renovation and other projects that would increase bed space, meeting rooms, and other program needs
c. Expand “tele-services’ for survivors and their families
d. Create an online/digital presence to inform, educate, and outreach appropriate resources to netizens
e. Implement a “care coordination” strategy to ensure that survivors have access to and utilize our comprehensive services
3. Develop and engage effective ways to measure and evaluate the work of WTLC
a. Assess current programs to identify and measure process and outcome goals
b. Analyze data and implement programmatic changes to achieve targeted results
4. Communicate the impact of WTLC to the broader community
a. Embrace marketing communications as a core function that supports long-term advancement
b. Assess stakeholders’ awareness of the organization’s brand identity
c. Foster organization-wide community engagement efforts that develop a deep and meaningful WTLC presence throughout the community
d. Provide regular media releases, assuring that WTLC is appropriately identified in all media and correspondence
5. Recruit and retain high quality, diverse staff and board of directors
a. Incorporate diversity, equity, and inclusion in crafting organizational culture and policies
b. Streamline new hire onboarding process
c. Offer various training opportunities for staff for professional growth
d. Implement an organization-wide compensation and benefits guideline that is aligned with current market trends
e. Create a Board Recruitment Plan that identifies gaps in skills, connections, and backgrounds
6. Expand and strengthen WTLC’s operational and financial capacity
a. Align appropriate resources to create capacity and build staffing infrastructure to meet the goals of the annual fundraising plan
b. Define an overall organizational goal for revenue from earned income and fundraising activities
c. Assess and develop an earned-income model to realize revenue targets

WTLC’s status as the oldest domestic violence shelter in Orange County speaks to our organization’s ability to adapt to meet the changing needs of survivors in our community. We were founded in 1976 as an emergency shelter for women and children fleeing domestic violence, and have since developed into a multi-service organization dedicated to responding to a range of violence and exploitation, including DV, Human Trafficking, Teen Dating Violence, and Elder Abuse.

As of 2017, all of WTLC’s services are mobile, now available to survivors whether or not they choose to participate in an emergency shelter program. This means that Advocates can meet with participants at one of WTLC’s facilities, or off-site in a community space that the participant chooses. This mobility allows Advocates to reach survivors for whom travel might be difficult, or who feel more comfortable receiving services in their own home.

WTLC is also dedicated to supporting a strong, coordinated community response to situations of violence. Because of this, we maintain active partnerships with other local organizations to ensure those in our programs have access to the best resources as they navigate their recoveries—this includes housing service providers, other domestic violence and human trafficking service providers, legal agencies, health care providers, law enforcement, and more. These partnerships allow us to ensure that every survivor who comes through our programs has a network of support throughout their time with us.

Finally, WTLC works to continually receive and incorporate feedback into our programs, always working to improve our services and develop our programs. This feedback comes from a range of sources: most importantly, from the survivors in our programs through ongoing satisfaction surveys and focus groups; but also from WTLC staff and leadership, our Board of Directors, and members of the community.

In recent years, we have made strides in overcoming barriers to services for survivors in our community. We launched our pets program in 2017, through which the pets of survivors are sheltered alongside their owners in our housing programs. We are the first and only DV service provider in OC to offer this service. We have additionally made all services mobile, available not only to residents of Bridge Housing, but also those living in the community.

In 2019, WTLC launched our Sensory Room, which utilizes sound, color, touch, and light to reach survivors and children for whom traditional talk therapy can be overwhelming. We are currently the only DV agency in the county with this service, and we are excited to partner with Cal State Fullerton this year to research the effectiveness of this service on survivors of trauma. We are also continuing to implement holistic classes designed to promote health and well-being through classes such as yoga and meditation, and soon gardening and self-defense.

We have implemented trauma-informed design into all aspects of our facilities, working to ensure our spaces are calming, welcoming, and comfortable for all who come through our doors. To assess the effectiveness and accessibility of our programs, we held our first survivor focus group, during which current and past participants in our various programs came together to discuss their experiences with us. In order to refine our programs and provide a culturally diverse culture, WTLC participated in the Cultural Responsiveness Organizational Survey and the Trauma-Informed Care survey to establish a baseline, assess our progress, and identify areas for growth.

We are proud of the developments we have made in recent years, but know that there is still much work to be done. We are working on a needs survey to help further our understanding of where survivors are experiencing gaps in services—both internally at WTLC and out in the community. This survey will help us develop our ability to provide support to survivors in all areas of their recoveries.

We are also excited to launch a capital campaign in 2020 to help expand our transitional housing for survivors in need of longer-term support. This campaign will convert one of our properties into living space for survivors and their children, creating a safe, comfortable, and welcoming environment for residents to base their recoveries.

A part of our strategic plan is to expand our services to reach people who have caused harm, in the goal of creating society-wide change that prevents future violence. This process will involve increasing counseling services and developing community education programming to reach members of our community. These efforts will require a shift in mindset, challenging the accepted narrative that people who cause harm are incapable of change and growth. WTLC staff will be trained on restorative justice, to better understand how we can help create change in our community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Womens Transitional Living Center, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Womens Transitional Living Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Mark Jablonski

St. Jude Medical Center

Term: 2019 -

Paul Prichard

Pacific Western Bank

Robert Cummins

The Complete Package

Suzy Lins

C21Discovery

Renee Aumiller

RDMCo

Mark Jablonski

St. Jude Medical Center

Chris Masilon

Anaheim PD

Dr. Robert Turner

USC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/2/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/03/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.