PLATINUM2024

Rose Brooks Center, Inc.

Rose Brooks Is Here

Kansas City, MO   |  www.rosebrooks.org

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Mission

The mission of Rose Brooks Center is to break the cycle of domestic violence so that adults, children, and their pets can live free of abuse.

Notes from the nonprofit

Rose Brooks Center envisions a world free of violence. We will serve as a leader of innovative comprehensive family violence services, sharing our legacy of hope through advocacy, education, and empowerment.

Ruling year info

1979

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Lisa Fleming

Main address

PO Box 8619

Kansas City, MO 64114 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

51-0231573

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

45 Years Of Safety… Rose Brooks Is Here. Rose Brooks Center is about saving lives. Each year, Rose Brooks Center reaches over 14,000 individuals and pets. While hundreds of individuals find safety in emergency shelter, thousands more are served outside of shelter each year. We accomplish this through groundbreaking programs and services, built over the past 40+ years. The mission of Rose Brooks Center is to break the cycle of domestic violence so that individuals and families can live free of abuse. We serve as a leader of innovative comprehensive family violence services, sharing our legacy of hope through advocacy, education, and empowerment. Rose Brooks Center aims to keep families safe, create a safer community, and end the cycle. We are committed to providing services and systems change advocacy guided by principles of survivor-centered advocacy, universal design for accessibility, and diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

24-Hour Crisis Line, Emergency Shelter, & Children's Program

Community members contacting the 24-Hour Crisis Line will receive support, information on community resources and how to access community resources, and develop a plan for safety. We will respond to an average of 80 victims per month who are identified by law enforcement as being at high risk for lethality. Our Emergency Shelter is a safe sanctuary where adults and children are welcomed, wrapped in support, and given time to heal. PAWS pet shelter is available for families escaping abuse with their pet. The Children’s Program provides connection with counselors and other professionals and methods for children to express themselves to heal from their abuse. An on-site health clinic is available to provide care and connection to needed health services.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

In the safety of local hospitals and clinics, the Bridge Program serves adult and child patients who are experiencing domestic violence. The goal is to bridge the gap between medical services and domestic violence services in order to offer victims of domestic violence a life without abuse. 
Services are provided 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.Advocates provide a compassionate and confidential connection to support, including shelter, legal services, counseling, and help in planning for safety.Medical staff receive continuous training from the Bridge Program staff on how to recognize and help patients who are experiencing domestic violence.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Support services help empower adult and child survivors of domestic violence to reclaim their lives through what can be a long and complex healing process. Substance Abuse Counseling assists clients in navigating the recovery process. This is accomplished within the Rose Brooks Center treatment program, and also in more intensive treatment programs outside of shelter.   Court Advocacy provides help to domestic violence survivors seeking relief and safety through complex court systems who may be overwhelmed and confused by the process.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Children/teens dealing with violence at home, in personal relationships, or in the community can receive support/counseling throughout the school year. Peer support groups, individual counseling, and educational presentations provide students the tools needed to make positive life choices and develop healthy relationships. Pre-school to high school students receive guidance on safety planning, anger control, healthy relationships, violence and substance abuse prevention, and building a positive sense of self.School personnel are offered training and consultation on how they can help students break the cycle of violence in their communities.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Finding affordable housing and gaining economic self-sufficiency is key to breaking the cycle of domestic violence. Housing Program participants receive housing assistance, advocacy, counseling, support groups, and home ownership education for up to two years. The Economic Advocacy Program provides participants with the knowledge and skills to achieve financial wellness and gainful employment.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accredidation 2022

Awards

4-Star Charity (10+ years) 2024

Charity Navigator

Healthiest Employers® Kansas City- Honoree 2024

Kansas City Business Journal; Blue Cross & Blue Shield

Community Champion (Project SAFE) 2022

Kansas City Public School (KCPS)

2nd-Highest Silver Status (Workplace Wellness) 2016

Healthy KC- KC Chamber of Commerce

Model Program-Trauma & Mental Health "Promising Practices and Model Programs" 2015

National Center on Domestic Violence

Profiled in 20th Anniversary VAWA Report; Personal invitation to be part of celebration 2014

Violence Against Women Act; US Vice President

National Celebrating Solutions Award (Bridge Program) 2014

Mary Byron Project

Technical Assistance Provider for OVW Disability Grant- model site 2013

Vera Institute of Justice

Outstanding Leadership in Violence Prevention 2012

Futures without Violence

Designated as Domestic Violence shelter site to tour for international visitors 2006

U.S. State Department

Oprah's Angel Network Award 2004

Oprah

Best Practice Award (Transitional Housing) 2003

Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

24-Hour Crisis Line, Emergency Shelter, & Children's Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals served in Emergency Shelter & Housing Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Families

Related Program

24-Hour Crisis Line, Emergency Shelter, & Children's Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This section correlates with Safe Nights Provided. Prior to 2018: Individuals served only included those staying in Emergency Shelter

Number of individuals served in Bridge Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Bridge Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020/21 Hospital numbers served decreased due to Covid, and our inability to see clients in Hospital due to restricted access.

Number of individuals served in Project SAFE

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Project SAFE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020-2021 School Year impacted by COVID.

Number of sessions including Economic Empowerment & Employment Advocacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families

Related Program

Housing and Economic Advocacy Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 & after: Housing clients and bed nights moved to "Safe Nights" and "Individuals Served in Shelter/Housing" Sections; 2019 & prior: Housing clients and bed nights included in totals.

Number of pets served in PAWS Place

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

24-Hour Crisis Line, Emergency Shelter, & Children's Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of safe nights for pets: *2022: 2,474 *2021: 2,952; *2020: 2,169; *2019: 4,155

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

24-Hour Crisis Line, Emergency Shelter, & Children's Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Safe nights represent emergency shelter and housing stays. COVID restrictions and renovations made to improve shelter environment decreased capacity in 2020 and after.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Rose Brooks Center envisions a world free of violence. We serve as a leader of innovative, comprehensive family violence services, sharing our legacy of hope through advocacy, education, and empowerment. We believe that violence can be eliminated if we commit to change. Rose Brooks Center has served the Kansas City community for over 40 years, and works daily to rebuild, reclaim, and save lives threatened by domestic violence. Rose Brooks Center offers a full continuum of services to increase victim safety and to heal and rebuild the lives of those impacted by domestic violence. Each of our programs and collaborative efforts furthers our commitment to our mission whether it is through supporting a survivor of domestic violence in crisis, or through partnering with the police department to better respond to survivors in need when they call for help, or through teaching our children and future leaders the skills to lead violence-free lives.

Rose Brooks Center is committed to a strategic, goal-oriented management approach. All decisions affecting programs and operations are tied to the organization's strategic plan, which is reviewed by the board of directors on a quarterly basis. To create a unified philosophy and approach throughout the organization, every staff member has a copy of Rose Brooks Center's Strategic Plan, which is used as a tool in annual employee performance evaluations. As a result, we are proud to say that we achieve our goals and objectives in a timely manner, and continue to move forward in the field of domestic violence prevention and intervention.

Rose Brooks Center is committed to serving the Kansas City community. Before construction on our facility in 2000, we served 5,985 survivors and their families annually. Today, our organization has grown significantly and we provide services to over 14,000 individuals annually. We are recognized and respected for best practices and responsiveness to survivors of domestic violence both throughout the community as well as on a national basis. In fact, Rose Brooks Center is recognized as a four-star charity by Charity Navigator, a certified charity with the Better Business Bureau, and received accreditation from the Council on Accreditation. As our programs and facilities expand, Rose Brooks Center makes it a priority to remain a strong fiduciary agent, making the most of the resources generously contributed to our organization.

Rose Brooks Center's 2021-2024 strategic plan was developed through listening sessions with every agency department. The activity list was organized into major themes, and goals were developed around the following categories: Client Service Excellence; Learning and Growth; Efficient Internal Processes; and Financial Stability. Progress is analyzed and reported quarterly to the Board of Directors to track the stages of progress (Planning, Implementation, and Completed). Annually, a review of the strategic plan process and achievements are reported to staff at an existing All-Staff meeting. Any staff member is invited to join recurring committees that align with the work and activities outlined in the Strategic Plan (i.e. Performance Quality Improvement Committee, Wellness Committee). Additionally, Rose Brooks Center operates with a service philosophy, derived from our mission-driven commitment to end the cycle of domestic violence, that ALL survivors deserve the right to access shelter and support services in an environment that is both safe and welcoming, and facilitates cultural responsiveness and inclusivity. In order to ensure our ongoing commitment, an active Diversity Connections committee is tasked with development and implementation of the agency's Equity and Inclusion Plan. A two-part training is required of all new staff at all levels of the agency to ensure equal access to services (ie. cultural competency, equal language access, accessible to survivors with disabilities, and trauma-informed), and at least three learning activities are required to be completed annually thereafter for each staff member; this is monitored annually through the employee performance evaluations. Rose Brooks Center understands the fight to end domestic violence is far from over. As we serve Kansas City moving forward, we keep a focus on our Strategic Plan and Equity and Inclusion Plan, and continuously evaluate our practices to better serve and adapt to our growing community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Rose Brooks Center, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rose Brooks Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/17/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Amy Kozup

American Century Investments

Term: 2023 - 2024


Board co-chair

Mark Garrett

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City

Term: 2023 - 2024

Amy Kozup

American Century

Kelly Porter

Porter Teleo

Annie Burcham

Children's Mercy Hospital

Peter Sowden

Atwood & Palmer, Inc.

Jennifer Bacon

Community Volunteer

Jane Dickinson-Kress

Academy Bank

Michelle Emanuel-Johnson

SS & C

Diana Keating

Community Volunteer

Tina Caudill

Coalfire

Shannon Griggs Failes

Research Psychiatric/ HCA-Research Medical Center

Kristin Edie

Hallmark

Colleen Hayes

Enterprise Bank & Trust

Mark Garrett

Blue Cross Blue Shield of KC

Naaem Babri

T-Mobile

Maggie Degen

Decha Pharmaceuticals, PLC

Glenda Grant

Oracle Cerner

Tim Hernandez

Kansas City Missouri Police Department

Shaun Stoker

KPMG, LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/29/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/19/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.