Faces & Voices of Recovery

Advocate. Act. Advance

Washington, DC   |  http://www.facesandvoicesofrecovery.org

Mission

Changing the way addiction and recovery are understood and embraced through advocacy, education and leadership.

Ruling year info

2004

Chief Executive Officer

Patty McCarthy

Main address

10 G Street Suite 600

Washington, DC 20002 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

51-0516206

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Management & Technical Assistance (S02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Faces & Voices of Recovery is the nation's leading recovery advocacy organization promoting policies that are grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights. Our supporters are individuals who believe that by eliminating stigma and discrimination and removing barriers to recovery more Americans will lead healthy lives in long-term recovery. Together we advance policies that reduce discrimination, and seek solutions that promote access to the treatment and recovery support services necessary to live a life in recovery. We work to ensure that Federal and State policies reflect the hope and resilience found in communities of recovery working to help others through a comprehensive approach to solving the addiction crisis in America.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Association of Recovery Community Organizations (ARCO)

The Association of Recovery Community Organizations (ARCO) at Faces & Voices of Recovery unites and supports the growing network of local, regional and statewide recovery community organizations (RCOs).

ARCO links RCOs and their leaders with local and national allies and provides training and technical assistance to groups. ARCO helps build the unified voice of the organized recovery community and fulfill our commitment to supporting the development of new groups and strengthening existing ones.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Substance abusers

The mission of the National Recovery Institute is to increase the knowledge, capacity, and accountability of recovery support providers throughout the United States and territories.

The National Recovery Institute is Faces & Voices of Recovery's primary vehicle for delivering training, technical assistance, evaluation, research, translation, and capacity building products and services to support individuals, organizations and states on topics related to recovery support services and policy development.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Substance abusers

The Recovery Data Platform (RDP) is a cloud-based software solution developed in part by Faces and Voices of Recovery and Recovery Trek. The platform aids RCO’s and Peer Service Providers with the tools and assessments needed to effectively implement peer recovery coaching programs. Through the use of robust reporting and scheduling tools, RDP provides your organization better outcomes data and service management tools.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Substance abusers

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

OUR GOALS

Laws and policies enable recovery, health, wellness and civic engagement for people affected by alcohol and other drugs.

Communities are organized and mobilized to address policies, practices and perceptions for people affected by alcohol and other drugs.

Individuals, families and communities affected by alcohol and other drugs have universal access to quality, effective care and supports to achieve recovery, health, wellness and civic engagement.

WHAT WE DO

Mobilize and organize to raise the profile of the organized recovery community and help more people find recovery by demonstrating that over 23 million Americans from all walks of life have found recovery and promote widespread understanding that long-term recovery is a reality and a process that takes time and support.

Build the capacity of recovery community organizations to thrive and participate in local, state and national policy arenas, deliver peer recovery support services; and mobilize the local recovery community.

Address public policy to reduce the discrimination that keeps people from seeking recovery or moving on to better lives once they achieve it and support recovery-oriented policies and programs.

We work to hard to support individuals in long-term recovery from drug and alcohol addiction and their family members, friends and allies in a variety of ways, including, capacity building in support of the national recovery movement, fighting the stigma of addiction, creating groundbreaking recovery messaging trainings and more. We educate about the issues of discrimination and prejudice against people in need of treatment and people in recovery, which are barriers that require a clear, concise and coordinated advocacy approach. We offer educational webinars and messaging training and tools that offer advanced guidance on the federal legislative process and how to work with legislators and staff to advance policy priorities. We provide the addiction treatment and recovering community with practical information and tools to enhance their capacity to engage in effective stigma reduction efforts.

Since 2004, we have trained tens of thousands of individuals in the Our Stories Have Power recovery messaging training. In 2012, we launched the Association of Recovery Community Organizations (ARCO) which unites and supports the growing network of over 100 local, regional and statewide recovery community organizations (RCOs). in 2017, we launched the Recovery Data Platform (RDP) to advance our goal of demonstrating the effectiveness of recovery support services as part of our recovery research agenda. In 2018, we launched the National Recovery Institute (NRI) to increase the capacity and effectiveness of recovery support providers nationwide.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve people in recovery from substance use disorders, their families, friends and allies. The addiction recovery community is always the foundation of our work. We also work with a range of non-government organizations, state and local governments and independent recovery community organizations by providing training, consultation, technical assistance, and bringing the voice of people with lived experience to policy discussions. We educate the public and policymakers about addiction and substance use disorders in an effort to eliminate stigma and prevent discrimination.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently changed our annual recovery leadership summit from an on-site event to a virtual event due to the feedback we have received from the community we serve. People with substance use disorders are at much higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19 and we made the decision to protect the health and safety of those we serve. We also have conducted extensive DEI forums and workgroups and launched a DEI committee to assure our work remains a priority and is reflected throughout our organization structure and programs.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The feedback we receive is shared with our committees which are all led by people in recovery form substance use disorders. We incorporate the voice of lived experience throughout our organization by maintaining a majority of staff and board members as people in recovery.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Faces & Voices of Recovery
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Faces & Voices of Recovery

Board of directors
as of 9/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

David Mineta

Momentum for Mental Health

Term: 2021 - 2023

David Mineta

Momentum for Mental Health

Kateri Coyhis

White Bison

Philander Moore

Texas Health and Human Services

Lawrence Medina

Rio Grande Alcoholism Treatment Program

Elizabeth Edwards

Singer, Songwriter, Recovery Advocate

Shelly Weizman

O’Neill Institute for National and GlobalHealth Law at Georgetown University Law Center

Ruby Takushi

Recovery Café Seattle

Chan Kemper

Legislative Analysis Public Policy Association (LAPPA)

Matt Boggs

Ryker Douglas

Laurie Johnson-Wade

Lost Dreams Awakening Recovery Community Organization (RCO)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/13/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data